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Ratification
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Red Herring
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Rule of Law
Red Herring
A red herring is irrelevant information used in a debate or argument to confuse the issue at hand.  A red herring could be a response that doesn't address the original issue, instead diverting the argument onto another topic. For example, a driver who was speeding might argue that he or she shouldn’t get a ticket because there are worse crimes being committed that should occupy the police. The argument is a red herring, a classic logical {fallacy} – the fact that worse crimes occur isn’t relevant to the fact that the driver was speeding.