A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Securities and Exchange Commission
Security Mom
Self Incrimination
Senate
Separation of Church and State
Separation of Powers
Session
Settlement
Sheriff
Signing Statements
Single Member District
Slavery
Soccer Mom
Social Democracy
Solar Energy
Solicitor
Solicitor General
Sovereign Immunity
Speaker of the House
Special Interest
Special Prosecutor
Standard of Proof
Stare Decisis
State
State Court
State of the Union Speech
States Rights
Statute
Stem Cells
Stocks
Strategic Petroleum Reserve
Straw Man
Straw Poll or Straw Vote
Strict Scrutiny
Subsidy
Subversive
Summary Opinion
Supply Side Economics
Supremacy Clause
Supreme Court
Swing Voters
States Rights
The 10th Amendment was included in the Bill of Rights to further define the balance of power between the federal government and the states. The amendment says that the federal government has only those powers specifically granted by the U.S. Constitution. These powers include the power to declare war, to collect taxes, to regulate interstate business activities and others that are listed in the articles. Any power not listed is left to the states or the people. Although the 10th Amendment does not specify what these “powers” may be, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that laws affecting family relations (such as marriage, divorce, and adoption), commerce that occurs within a state’s own borders, and local law enforcement activities, are among those specifically reserved to the states or the people.