A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Ratification
Rational Basis Test
Reapportionment
Recess
Recess Appointments
Recession
Recorder of Deeds
Recreation Commissioner
Red Herring
Redistricting
Referendum
Register of Wills
Religious Test
Renewable Energy
Reparations
Representative
Republic
Republican Form of Government
Republicanism
Resolution
Respondent
Review
Rhetoric
Rider
Right Against SelfIncrimination
Right to an Attorney
Right to Be Informed of the Charges Against You
Right to Bear Arms
Right to Jury Trial
Right to Petition the Government
Right to Privacy
Right to Public Trial
Right to Speedy Trial
Right to Travel
Rights or Individual Rights
Roll Call Vote
Rule of Law
Reapportionment
Every ten years, after each census is taken, the House of Representatives is reapportioned to make Congressional districts contain as mathematically equal a number of residents as possible. Originally, the House expanded in size to reflect population growth, but in 1929, the number of seats was fixed at 435. Thus reapportionment has required some states to gain seats and some to lose them. Each state must have at least one representative.


Donald Ritchie, Our Constitution (Oxford University Press)