A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Pardon
Parliamentary Procedure
Parliamentary System
Participation
Partisan
Patent
Permanent Resident
Petitioner
Plaintiff
Pluralism
Plurality Opinion
Police Chief or Police Commissioner
Political Party
Poll Tax
Popular Sovereignty
PorkBarrel Spending
Pragmatic
Preamble
Precedent
President
Presidential System
Presidents Room
Primary Source
Privileges and Immunities
Procedural Justice
Progressive
Prohibition
Prohibition Against Cruel and Unusual Punishment
Prosecutor
Protection Against Double Jeopardy
Prothonotary
Public Financing
Protection Against Double Jeopardy
This portion of the Fifth Amendment protects individuals from being “twice put in jeopardy of life or limb”—that is, in danger of being punished more than once for the same criminal act. The U.S. Supreme Court has interpreted the double jeopardy clause to protect against a second prosecution for the same offense after acquittal or conviction and against multiple punishments for the same crime.

Like other provisions in the Bill of Rights that affect criminal prosecutions, the double jeopardy clause is rooted in the idea that the government should not have unlimited power to prosecute and punish criminal suspects. Rather, the government gets only one chance to make its case.



www.justicelearning.org, The United States Constitution, what it says, what it means, A Hip Pocket Guide (Oxford University Press)