A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Fallacy
Federal Court
Federal Election Campaign Act
Federal Election Commission
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Federal Reserve
Federal Reserve Chairman
Federalism
Felony
Filibuster
Fire Commissioner
Fiscal Policy
Fiscal Year
Flexible Fuel Vehicle
Food and Drug Administration
Foreclose
Foreign Policy
Fossil Fuels
Framers of the Constitution or Founding Fathers
Franking
Free Exercise Clause
Free Trade
Freedom of Assembly
Freedom of Association
Freedom of Religion
Freedom of Speech
Freedom of the Press
Front Runner
Fugitive
Fugitives from Labor Provision
Full Faith and Credit
Futures Market
Futures Market
Filibuster

A filibuster is an effort on the part of legislators to delay or block action on a bill. A filibuster traditionally required a legislator to extend debate by speaking for hours on end, but other tactics can be used to prevent a vote on proposed legislation. A legislator, for instance, can offer procedural motions, ask for a quorum call or demand a time-consuming roll call vote. Filibusters aren’t permitted in the U.S. House of Representatives. In the Senate, a filibuster can be ended by using a measure called “{cloture},” which requires a three-fifths majority vote. Former South Carolina Sen. J. Strom Thurmond holds the record for the longest filibuster: He spoke for 24 hours and 18 minutes against a limited civil rights bill in 1957.