Speak Outs
Speak Out
Should smartphone users have a ‘Privacy Bill of Rights’?

April 17, 2012

By John Vettese, Student Voices staff writer

A recent sketch on Saturday Night Live featured recurring character The Devil, joking about how he invented the Internet with “Weekend Update” host Seth Meyers.

“Parts of it anyway,” The Devil said. “Have you ever said yes to one of those Terms of Service Agreements without reading it?”

For legal experts and some politicians, it’s less of a laughing matter.

When you download an app onto your smartphone, you have to agree to its privacy policy. Oftentimes, it is spread across 20 or 30 pages and filled with heavy legal language that would take you days to decipher.

“For most of us, it's really challenging to read this stuff and make sense out of it,” said San Francisco attorney Kurt Opsahl in an interview with the San Jose Mercury News. “Some of them are so lengthy that if you spent a day surfing the Web collecting all the terms and policies affecting you, it would take you more than a whole other day to read them all. It's not physically possible.”

When all someone wants to do is play Words With Friends with their friends, or listen to music on Spotify, they might forgo the actual reading and skip right to the agreeing.

Problem is, the devil is often in the details. Many of those apps make money on advertising, and they want their ads to be as effective as possible, getting out to as many people as possible, and getting to people who might be interested in what they’re selling. So with some of those privacy policies, you’re actually giving the app access to your personal information – such as your contacts list, your age and gender, your religion, your political leanings –things that it can use to more specifically direct its advertisements to you and your friends.

Critics say the app-makers hope you won’t bother reading through the legal language and will just agree to the policy, without realizing what exactly you agreed to. They have said these privacy policies are actually major invasions of privacy.

While the Bill of Rights does not include a specific “right to privacy,” the Supreme Court has recognized a “zone of privacy” created by created by the Third Amendment (privacy of one’s home) and Fourth Amendment (privacy of one’s property and person). But it’s less clear how that privacy extends to your personal information on the Internet and mobile networks, even if you use your own property and your home to access them. And when you agree to waive your rights, the companies are in the clear – even if your consent was given unknowingly, through underhanded means.

Many advocates, like San Francisco’s Electronic Frontier Foundation, are calling for a “Privacy Bill of Rights” for mobile phone users that requires these agreements to be “human-readable.” In other words, written in language that can be understood by somebody without a law degree.

Another option that California Attorney General Kamala Harris is calling for is a required feature in mobile apps that would launch a pop-up warning every time the app is about to do something with your personal information.

What do you think?

Should smartphone users have a “Privacy Bill of Rights”? Should they be forced to make their Terms of Service agreements “human-readable” so users know what they’re agreeing to? What do you think about Attorney General Harris’ plan for pop-ups warning you when apps would use your personal information? Have you ever read a privacy policy? If so, did you find it understandable? Join the discussion!
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Comments
1/11/2013
Sidney Montana
Chris
Mr. Faulhaber Sidney High School
I think that all of the agreements should be easy to read and not 20- 30 pages long so that people would actually read them and know what they are signing.

12/13/2012
montgmery tx
johnson scar
M, MHS
we should have privacy on our smartphone because our lifes mostly go in that phone. tech is getting to smart for us.

12/10/2012
CA
Yovana
MHS
Agreements should be made that are reader friendly. I think it is a good idea to have a warning that lets you know which apps use your personal information.

12/9/2012
Montgomery/Texas
Dakota
Metzger/Montgomery High School
I think that smartphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights" because, what is in their phone should not so easily be available to others. Also, app makers should make their Terms of Service agreements more "human-readable" so they are easily understood and the average person would know what they are downloading. Attorney General Kamal Harris had a great plan about making pop-up warnings in apps when they are about to use your personal information. If we are aware of our information being shared then we can feel more safe about the apps that we download. I personally never read the privacy policy because it is way to long and contains a bunch of things that i could not understand. It would be great to be able to understand the Terms of Service, so that I would know my personal business is all over the world being spread around.

10/30/2012
Sidney, MT
Marcos
Mr. Faulhaber
Yes, smarphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights". The trems of service agreements are long and time consuming to read. the terms and agreement needs to be shorter and easier to understand by everyone not just the ones with law degrees or studing legal terms.

10/24/2012
Watertown/MA
Elayna
Mr. Rimas/Watertown High School
This is sort of a complicated issue because of different people's definitions of 'human-readable'. I think that this is definitely a worthwhile cause, and I'm fully in favor of it, but it would be easy for companies to find loopholes and argue that some things are 'human-readable' when in actuality they aren't. It's difficult for the law to determine what people are capable of understanding with concrete standards. However, the pop-up idea, warning the user when their information is going to be used, is much easier for the law to be able to agree on. Using a pop-up to warn users of their personal information being used, and possibly requiring consent for that information to be used, may not deter people from letting their information to be used, but it would ensure that people at least somewhat understand what that information is being used for, and they don't have the excuse of the information being illegible to anyone without a law degree.

9/17/2012
Irving/Texas
Priyank
Austin/ JESA
I think as technology becomes more advanced, we should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights." But at the same time, whenever we sign a phone contract or download an app on our smartphone, we have to agree to terms and conditions, i'm sure there's something in those terms and conditions that address our privacy. Except, most of us don't read a single word, we just hit accept and move on. To avoid conflicts with privacy, they should make it so anyone can understand. Maybe have the privacy conditions in big bold letters, instead of tiny fine print font where nobody bothers to read it. Whenever I see those tiny words, and see how many pages the terms and agreements are, I just skip it. I've never bothered to read it.

9/7/2012
Sidney, MT
Brandon M.
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that they should be forced to make a summarized version of their Terms of Service agreements so that everyone may understand them. Not everyone has the opportunities or priviledge like most people do to go to school or grow up in a proper environment. Using your smart phone and downloading apps should not involve having to have the comprehension level such as that of a college student. It should be simple and to the point and only maybe a few paragraphs long. That way people know what they are agreeing to and can still figure it out even if they don't have the fortune to have the education that they want or need.

8/30/2012
Rudyard, MT
Kassidy
Mrs. Campbell-North Star High School
When I download a new app on my phone and the privacy agreement pops up I almost always hit accept because I don't understand 95% of what they say in it. I'm sure that I'm not the only person that does that. Now knowing that accepting that puts your personal information at stake, I believe they should have to put a blunt agreement that everyone will understand. That way there are no surprises, you know what you are accepting to and if there is something that you don't approve of you will know it because you will be able to understand what you are accepting. So I do believe Smart Phones should have to make all the agreements much more understandable to keep our information safe.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/ California
Lorena N.
Ms.Bailey/Dr.Olga Mohan High School
I think this whole idea is stupid. Why are we focusing on people that are too lazy to read a phone app. contract when there are more crucial issues out in the world.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/ CA
Ibeth & Bells
Ms.bailey
We think that there should be a summary of all the different app terms. It would be easier for us to understand so we won't get messed up. But for them to be shorter because then people don't end up reading them completely beacuse of how long they are. We really do agree there shoukd be a change in the terms that way it would be easier for us and we wouldn't have any problems.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Justin J.
Mrs. Bailey/DOMHS
Smartphones have been stripped of the title "phone" due to the fact that people nowadays use their phones for everything except the calling feature. People play games, browse the internet and listen to music. Many times, to use these features, you must download an application. And many times, these applications have terms of agreements. I believe that they should reduce the length of the contract to only important parts while warning them about the consequences of releasing your information.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/California
isabel m.
ms.Bailey
in this article i agree that they should have a bill of rights to know what they should do and so it wouldnt be unconstitutional. i also feel that the states should put this in pkace so that the people can follow with this to make thingd constitutional

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/California
Kevin
Mrs. Bailey/DOMHS
The state should have the power to regulate the controversy over smart phones. There shouldn't be an amendment because it doesnt make sense to make an issue over a phone. My honest opinion is that there shouldnt be argueing over an idea like this and spend some time and care for the real issues in California, such as poverty.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles, CA
Paula
Mrs. Bailey
Many times, when downloading an app, many people do not read the terms of service and go straight to agreeing. This is a reason that many people get robbed in many ways. The terms of service are really long and I do not understand what I am reading. This is the reason sometimes I do not download apps because I feel as if I need to learn more about it. These terms of services should be shorter and to the point, but in a clear manner that everyone can understand because then people can understand and feel comfortable on knowing what they are agreeing to. I feel that Attorney General Harris’ plan with the pop ups is a great idea because then people will be able to know if the app wants to use your personal information and for what it will be used. I have tried to read a privacy policy but the more I kept reading, the harder it was to understand. This was because it uses so many words to describe one detail, so I try to figure out what it actually means and then I still have to keep that in mind while I read the rest of the terms. This is why I agree that there should be a “Privacy Bill of Rights” but not only for smartphones, but for everything that you have to agree to the terms of service.

8/22/2012
Bell/California
Carlos
Bailey/DOMHS
The thing with this is that most people don't even read the terms and just agree (obviously) because let's face it, those terms are really long. I won't deny that I myself have done this countless times. For now, I agree that there should be a privacy bill of rights to help, or protect in this case, all the people that refuse to read the terms of agreements and are completely unaware of what is being agreed. Either people need to start reading the privacy policy section, atleast, or they need somthing to ensure they are safe.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles
David
Dr. Olga Mohan High School
I believe that such a thing is not nesasary because while, yes they do take your information they just use it to advertice to you in a better way but if you ignore them then they dont work it wont matter even if they took that info

8/22/2012
Los Angeles
Eric
Ms. Bailey
I think smartphone users should have their own bill of right because the terms and conditions that I would agree to would take me hours to read and maybe even days to disect. It uses such intelectual diction that most people eve with a degree may not fully understand. However, companies have the right to look at who I call, who my friends are, and who I text? By doing so, I am now putting my friend's reputation on the line. Companies have no reason to need contact my friends because I am the one who's buying the app, not my friends. I believe smartphone users should have their own bill of right because by accepting these terms and conditions, we are allowing compaines to access much more information than needed.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/California
Sergio A.
Mrs.Bailey/Dr.Olga Mohan High School
I believe users should have a privacy bill of rights because it will keep our personal information from being stolen. They should also make the terms and agreements easier for people to understand so people would actually take their time to read the terms.Sometimes reading the those policy are confusing for me and I just agree without reading them.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Leslie
Ms.Bailey/Dr.Olga Mohan High School
I don't believe that smartphones users should have a "privacy bill of rights"because its not important as the immigration policy that is happening in Arizona or the restrictions of Gay marriages in some states. I understand that what the companies are doing is wrong because they are not respecting our privacy. Instead of creating a document that will take years to be passed a simple amendment or a law should be place. Along with terms that could be easily read to see if the terms is an invasion of privacy.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/California
Karina
Mrs.Bailey/Dr. Olga Mohan High School
I think that smartphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights." People should be able to have "human-readable" Terms of Service agreements because people should be able to understand what they are giving themselves into and not blindly accept something that is going to invade their privacy. I have never personally read the Terms of Service because there is a lot of text and a lot of technological words that are difficult sometimes to understand. I think it would be a great idea that Attorney General Harris brought up the idea of pop-up warnings for apps that have access to personal information so people could get a warning before accepting the terms of conditions.

8/22/2012
Los Angeles/California
Eunice
Mrs.Bailey/DOMHS
I believe that smartphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights" because everyone should be able to know when their personal information is being used. Most people don't read and understand everything that is said in the terms of service agreements. Terms of service agreements should be written in less technical terms so that every individual who reads it can comprehend it. It is not right to make privacy policies difficult to understand. Every individual has the right to know when and for what their personal information is being used.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Robert
Ms.Bailey/DOMHS
I believe that smartphone users should have a 'Privacy Bill of Rights' because it is a violation of a person's right of privacy to get their contacts and their personal information just so that they can advertise their company and apps to more people. A person's right to privacy should include privacy when downloading smartphone apps too. It should be the person's right to give their information to the companies if they choose so not the companies finding out the person's information without them even knowing it -__-.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/California
eduardo ch.
Mrs.Bailey/ Dr. Olga Mohan High School
I believe that smartphones or any type of device should be given a privacy bill of rights. This is due to the fact that the consumers are not prepared to understand the language used in the terms of service. There is also the fact that the producers know this and use it for their advantage. I have only read a few privacy policies and to say they are difficult to understand would be an understatement. Though Harris' plan of pop-ups is smart their is still the fact that they wish to fish out ones own private information and that's still not okay.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles, CA
Cesar
Ms.Bailey
I believe smartphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights." Many smartphone users agree to the terms of service without knowing what the certain company is able to do if you use thier app. Things such as "personal information" can be released without any violation of the law or to privacy because one has agreed to their terms of service. One had been expected to read it, but many users dont read because the language is to difficult to understand. I think companies should make the terms of service more "human-readable" so everyone can understand what they're agreeing to.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Eduardo S.
Mrs.Bailey
I agree with the idea that there should be a change to the terms and agreements. It should be done in a way that it can be understood by a person without a law degree. Since this does not fall under the enumerated powers then the states should be able to regulate this, if it can not be made into an amendment.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Mario
Ms.Bailey/DOMHS
I agree that all smartphones should have a 'Privacy Bill of Rights' because some app makers are violating our privacy. Instead of making the Terms and Conditions extensively long, they should rewrite the whole thing to make it "human-readable." This will save a lot of us time, and we will be informed about what we are agreeing to. I think that Attorney General Harris' plan for pop-ups is a great idea because it is not right for app makers to use our personal information. They shouldn't be allowed to access any personal information. It is a violation of privacy. There was one time when I tried reading the Terms and Conditions, but the language in which it was written was too complicated to understand. Not even the dictionary that I used to decipher the language in which the Terms and Conditions were written was much of help. It was practically useless.Therefore, I believe that app makers should make the Terms and Conditions "human-readable" and that there should be a 'Privacy Bill of Rights.'

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/ California
Jaquayl C.
Ms. Bailey/ Dr.Olga Mohan HighSchool
I believe that the privacy of of personal cellphones is truly needed. Everyone should have the right to say that they want to give out personal information such as telephone numbers & etc. or not. However, if the privacy bill of rights it should be where teens could understand and know whats going on with their personal information.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/ CA
Christopher V.
Mrs. Bailey/ Dr. Olga Mohan High School
I'm pretty sure we all skipped and ignored that privacy policy. I've only read it once and it was sort of a pain to read, lots of paragraphs, very detailed, but some what non-understandable. These writings are intentionally written, but i doubt the owner would care about how much we have to read. In my opinion we should not have a Privacy Bill of Rights because that is a little too extreme. The Terms of Services should be "toned" down and easier to read for the average user. If this Terms of Service was simpler to possibly read, the pop-up warnings could be abolished and the the talk of a Privacy Bill of Rights would not have started. With that said people would actually read the Terms of Services and understand what is being discussed in the document before agreeing to anything.

8/21/2012
los angeles
edgardo
dr. olga mohan hs
i believe we should because we give our personal information in our mobile device and the contracts are too long for people to agree to the terms they are giving most people do not even take the time to read or understand it

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Ronald
Bailey/DOMHS
I am pretty sure there has not been a single app in which I have read the privacy policy. Most of the time it is just because I want to get to the game. The one time I tried reading it there was so much law jargon that I quickly lost interest. I believe that much of the wording is placed to make the app user want to skip the reading and ignore a few of the details. This often leads to corporations taking advantage of people and them exposing "clients" to media that appeals to them. To avoid this,a "privacy Bill of Rights" would be most suited. This way, people are able to know what the app will be doing with their private informaton and be able to make a choice. Attorney General Harris' plan is also good. That way people will know when and why an app would use thir information.

8/21/2012
Los Angeles/CA
Noemi
Mrs. Bailey/DOMHS
The terms shall be shorten up and be more clear for people to understand. Most just click "accept" with out knowing what they just accepted.

5/30/2012
IRVING/TX
Dalena
Bradley/Nimitz
Let's face it, we all can admit that there have been a point in our lives where we've skipped and ignored the privacy policy. These writings are purposely made lengthy because if the owner actually cared for others to read it, the owners would do their best to make it as succinct as possible. Smartphones users shouldn't have a privacy Bill of Rights simply because that sounds a little too much. However, the Terms of Service should be understanding enough for users. If the Terms of Service was more "human-readable," we wouldn't need pop-up warnings or a Privacy Bill of Rights -- and maybe we'd actually have a higher amount of users reading the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

5/29/2012
Irving/TX
Jordan
Bradley/Nimitz
I absolutely agree with the idea of a ''Privacy Bill Of Rights''.Millions of people just want to get an app as fast as they can that they don't read all the terms and conditions.Sometimes we just believe that everyone is trustworthy that we just click ''ok''.The app companies should list of their terms in easy,readable words to those that don't study law.

5/29/2012
Irving/Texas
Melissa
Bradley/Nimitz
I think that it is a smart idea for smart phones to have their terms of service agreements easy enough for everyone to understand. I am sure that most of the people who have smart phones agree to all the terms without even reading them. The way that they are written is designed for us as the consumers to be overwhelmed with the contract and blindly agree to it. I guess you can say that there is people who are just lazy and don't bother to read them just because they don't want to, but there is other people who do want to know what they're agreeing to, but they don't understand. If people knew what they were really agreeing to, I know they would be outraged and demand that they have their rights protected. I think that it is wrong that companies do that. Not everyone knows all the legal vocabulary and of course that means that not everyone is going to know what the terms are talking about. There just needs to be a change and people need to be able to know about what they are about to agree on.

5/28/2012
Irving/Tx
Lucy
Bradley / Nimitz
Smartphone users, like me who's lazy to read the fine print and tend to skip right to “agree” or “okay”, should have a “privacy bill of rights” because it would help us be assured that we are not going to be victims of anything and feel safe about what we are downloading without having to figure out what 20-30 pages of terms truly mean. The terms & services should be short, simple, and to the point to help save time while at the same time actually catching the attention of the user. I, myself, know that if I see a novel typed out for me to read, I wouldn't bother reading it at all...But if the text was a a few lines long, I wouldn't have any trouble giving a few minutes up to read and understand what it is asking of me for permission. Pop up warnings wouldn't really stop the whole issue to be honest....It's just like pop up ads / update scans, I never take the time to look at them and X out as soon as I see something pop up without even taking the time to look into it. No one likes to get scammed. I'm sure the U.S. Supreme Court doesn't either, so shouldn't they be on our side and go through with providing us all a “privacy bill of rights”? I sure think they should! Technology is evolving continuous so we as individuals should too – First, by listening and following through with society's demands.

5/24/2012
Irving/Texas
Yasmin
Bradley/Nimitz
Smartphones should have a “Privacy Bill of Rights.” Instead of having a really lengthy and difficult to understand Terms and Services agreement, it should be a short and concise agreement. No one that I know, including me, will ever take the time to read a 20 to 30 page agreement, that is not even understandable unless you're a lawyer, when maybe the app will only be used once or twice. Having these long agreement terms are really unfair because they are not “human-readable,” like it was said on the Speak Out. And I do agree with Attorney General Kamala Harris' plan for the pop-up warning, a warning for when an app will use our personal information, yes, we should definitely be warned.

5/15/2012
Irving TX
Elizabeth R
Bradley/ Nimitz
It is only right that smart phone users have a “privacy Bill of Rights.” I do not want to download an app knowing that I am giving my information out to random people. I have personally experienced downloading an app and not being able to understand anything that the terms of service agreements are saying. This causes me to go right ahead and agree without even reading it. A person that is willing to download an app of some kind deserves to be able to read exactly what they are agreeing to. Attorney General Harris' plan for pop-ups warnings is a great Idea. Of course a person does not want anyone going through their private things at all, but if a person has to agree to that in order to use the certain app then a person at least deserves to know when their things are being accessed.

5/11/2012
Porterville, CA
John
Smith/Monache
Everybody should have the right to keep private any information they want to keep private. You should not be swindled into agreeing to give up you personal information without any reasonable form of contesting this. The legal system we put up with today seems to continuously extort our laziness and our inability to fight back effectively. There should be some way to protect consumers from these legal aberrations and to protect their privacy. There should be some form of "Privacy Bill of Rights."

5/10/2012
Porterville, CA
Andres
Mr.Smith/Monache
Smartphone users should have a privacy bill of rights. Companies who require you to agree to they terms of services should be forced to make it readable. People tend to get lost as soon as they start to read it so they just skip the reading part and go directly to the agree. I think that the Attorney General Harris’ idea of pop-up warnings when the app is trying to use my personal information is a great idea. That will help users understand better what they have agreed to. I have tried reading the privacy policy before and found my self thinking over and over what have I just read.

5/10/2012
porterville,ca
salinna
smith/ monache
i think that they should make the privacy bill of rights readable. Since no one really has the time or effort to read them. All they do is agree and go on there way. Though they might not since the consumer finally knowing the consequeses of what there agreeing to may effect the company. Even myself dont understand those agreement. Thus we didnt all go to laq school so they should make it readable.

5/9/2012
Irving/TX
Cathy
Bradley/Nimitz
I fully agree and encourage smartphone users to have a “Privacy Bill of Rights”. In reality, no one is going to sit there and read all the terms and conditions that pops up before downloading games like “Words With Friends.” We are lazy, we just want the game downloaded and get everything over with. In the back of our minds we know that there might be some hidden word usages or information that we wouldn't really agree with if it was in “human-readable” terms, but when a bunch of words pop up it'll be the last thing to cross our mind. We've heard of stories where people get fined or punished for agreeing with the terms but in the end it ended up backfiring them. Only 16.9% of Texans held college degrees in 2000. I don't think we have improved that much, so of course we'd have to some form of human-readable agreements. Apps and app creators are making their terms and agreements complicated on purpose so they can subliminally put things into context so we don't know what we're agreeing to. Attorney General Harris' plan for pop-up warnings is genius. How hard would get that up and working? Probably not very hard. I never read the privacy policies because I already know what I'm getting myself into if I start reading.

5/8/2012
Irving, Texas
Fatima S
Bradley/Nimitz
I think that a smart phone user should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights." I think that privacy policies that are easily readable and straight forward would benefit everyone. Instead of making them long, elaborate, and complicated...why not opt for something simple, easy, and understandable. If people actually took the time to read all of what a Privacy policy said it would take like an hour of everyone's day. With school, work, and social events who really has an hour to throw away? Pop ups that warn us of what information is being used is a great idea. That way we know what we are getting ourselves into before we decide to click the accept button. I have tried to read a privacy policy before, but I've given up on it because the language is just too straightforward and monotone. Maybe if they made it a bit exciting and shorter, I would take the time to read it.

5/6/2012
Irving/Texas
Michael Ugwulebo
Bradley/Nimitz
I believe that Smart phone users have a “privacy Bill of Rights”. You would not like someone to read or see your text or know who you are testing. Because is personal. I think the should not be forced to make their Terms of service agreements “human -readable” so users know what they're are agreeing to. When you download an app onto your smart phone, you have to agree to its privacy policy. Oftentimes, it is spread across 20 or 30 pages and filled with heavy legal language that would take you days to decipher. I think that Attorney General Harris plan the pop-ups warning will be a great idea, because people will have the choice of downloading the app, and knowing what is happening .Yes I have read a privacy policy., and was not understandable.

5/6/2012
Porterville Ca
Anthony
Smith/MOnache High School
Yes, i believe that Smartphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights." The right written should also be readable by most Americans because many of the "Bill of Rights" are not understandable by many people trying to read them. I think all laws and forms of American laws should be translated into a more understanding form for every average person.

5/3/2012
Irving/Texas
Mayra
Bradley/Nimitz
I believe that there should a “Privacy Bill of Rights” for smartphones. Making the Terms and Service agreement so long and using difficult words which many people do not understand should be changed. That agreement to meant to be read by the people, and if they make it long and difficult, it is unfair. I think it would be a good idea for the pop up notice, because then people will have the choice of downloading the app, and knowing what is happening. I have tried reading one, but most of the time I was trying to look up every word that I did not understand which was most of them.

5/3/2012
Irving/Texas
Taylor G
Bradley/Nimitz
Privacy agreements are and have been problematic for years. Even before smartphones, these contracts have been in use. The problem now it seems, is that personal information is being posted. In 1991, you could have installed a game of Starcraft and have to agree to the terms of use online and offline. However, unlike Starcraft, smartphones have personal information on it which can be considered an invasion of privacy if breached. Even now with games like World of Warcraft or Call of Duty, an online contract must be agreed to before playing online, however; there is no threat if you do not read it because there is no private information companies can breach. This has been the thought of people who blindly agree to these contracts 11 years ago and today. Companies have recently added many ads, brought in by 3rd parties, and this is somewhat where the problem has been created. The 3rd parties want information, and information is given, all of it or some of it. No one really knows how much information is being given. Is name and birth given, or is how long your mouse goes over a product given and how long you have been on the site? It has been discovered companies have been given vasts information such as where a user's mouse has been and for how long. A recent story about Target said that they can discover if a female user is pregnant by the products she searches for and information like how long her mouse stays over an item. Target then put baby products in the ads. Third party advertisers do the same. Google sends its information to third parties too. Have you noticed that if you are a cyclist, that you will find ads sponsored by Google on Gamestop's site and the same cycling ads on a clothing website you've never been to? These companies get away with this because no one has been bothered by it or have written complaints to sites like Youtube who post ads that are seemingly getting longer and longer.

5/3/2012
Irving, Tx
Jocelyn E.
Bradley/Nimitz
I think that as a smart phone user, we should have a privacy bill of rights. Privacy policies are like a big trick. Of course we want to download the app, so they trick us by making this big long agreement in which they get what they want because we are to lazy to read, and can't understand half of anyway. I think that if they don't want to make the agreement "human-readable", then they should at least use the pop ups to warn us when our information is being used and what is being used. I haven't tried to read a privacy policy because honestly that is alot to read and I am not about to waste time reading a million pages full of lawyer talk.

5/2/2012
Irving, TX
Allison
Nimtiz/Bradley
Smartphone service providers are not under any obligation to make privacy policies any more legible, much in the same way as we are not clamoring for lease agreements or other contracts to be put in simple terms. However, privacy policies should never contain any provisions that infringe upon people's rights to privacy. This raises the argument: Whose job is it to make sure privacy policies found on the internet and in the app store are not infringing on our rights to privacy? Those people who say it is the consumer's responsibility may advocate simplifying privacy policies. However, I believe there should be some kind of regulation to rid the market of unconstitutional or just plain ridiculous privacy policies.

5/1/2012
Irving, Texas
Kevin Sanchez
Bradley/Nimitz
Companies shouldn't have to make their terms of agreements "human-readable". To me, for the most part, they are already readable. Most people aren't going to read the terms even if they were just a page long. There should be one universal privacy policy and whatever companies want to add on to it is what users should have to read. The whole pop-up warning that Attorney General Kamala Harris is dumb in my opinion. It would frustrate users and cause the companies to lose customers.

4/30/2012
Irving/ Tx
Randie
Bradley/ Nimitz
I think that smartphone users should have a “Privacy Bill of Rights”. Because I have a smartphone and I did not know that the companies could get into my personal information. Yes, the Terms of Service agreements “human-readable” so that the users know what they are agreeing to. I think that Attorney General Harris’ plan for pop-ups warning when apps use your personal information is a REALLY good idea. I have never read a privacy policy, because they are really time consuming trying to read the whole thing. And it is really hard to understand all that the company is saying.

4/30/2012
Irving/TX
Carolina
Bradley/Nimitz
For the protections of the ones privacy smart phones should include a privacy bill of right. Even if the many users will ignore the rights there is still a small amount of people that will read all thru the contract to just be safe. If they made the Terms of service agreement “human readable” most users are use to just agreeing to the text above and moving to their new app; so their would be no point of making app makers do that. But regarding Attorney General Harris' plan the pop up warning would be more effective with the users making them aware of the personal information going out to the company. I have read the couple of lines of the policy and most of the time I quit reading of it. The wording of the privacy policy is like in another language plus the context is very boring.

4/30/2012
Benson/AZ
Darrel
sorensom/Benson
I think that they all phone companys should have a privacy policy so that anything that is said or done with the phone can and should not be seen or talk about by anyone but the owner of the phone and the other person cause it is between them and no one else they have the right to keep it between them.

4/30/2012
benson az
dakota w
soreson benson high
it should becaue it is a would let us be able to keep all of are things private and hidded from everyone.

4/29/2012
Irving, TX
Lilly H
Bradley/Nimitz
Technology is advancing by leaps and bounds, and it's becoming more and more important that we address our rights in this growing area. That's why even though it sounds really out there, a privacy bill of rights should be created for smartphone users. Privacy is already implied in the constitution, but giving privacy a structure through a bill of rights is reasonable if not necessary given the circumstances. Terms of Service agreements should definitely be “human-readable” too. We don't have all the time in the world to read them much less understand what they entail. Also, considering the fact that the majority of users are not lawyers, that's more reason for companies to have succinct, human-readable agreements that are easier to understand. I for one have tried to read a privacy policy. It wasn't particularly hard to understand, but it was so lengthy that I just checked the box and moved on with my life. I knew I could have been missing some important information, but it was really hard to muster up the responsibility to read it all. Attorney General Harris' plan for pop ups isn't new or revolutionary either. Practically all facebook apps use your personal information and even tell you in a small dialogue box. Even so, I don't think pop up warnings are effective. They come up often, making us more inclined to just dismiss them. I know I do anyway.

4/29/2012
Irving/TX
Carly T
Bradley/Nimitz
As the mobile networks expands to the point of encompassing the lives and personal information of millions of Americans, the Supreme Court should be allowed to lay out guidelines and rules for the businessmen involved with the ever-growing programs, just as laws have been made for entrepreneurs of material goods. People still have rights when they purchase a phone. A “Rrivacy Bill of Rights” would be a wonderful way to ensure that every time a person downloads an app they aren't going to become a victim of a trade conspiracy. Terms and Services need to be clear and understandable for the general public; otherwise, companies are creating a false or misleading advertisement which is illegal based on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the First Amendment. The pop-up warnings wouldn't stop the issue of deceitful smartphone app designers, and many people would probably foolishly ignore the warning. While I have skimmed through privacy policies before, I've found them too wordy and too complicated to go into even a paragraph of thorough reading. It is definitely time for the US Supreme Court to lay down the law for those profiting off of phone apps.

4/27/2012
Irving,TX
Richard
Bradley/Nimitz
Smartphones should have a “Privacy Bill of Rights”. These companies should write their terms of service agreements in a language that users can understand. The plan for the pop-up warnings sound perfect. These warnings would keep users alert of what their apps are trying to do. I have never read a terms of service agreement that was longer than a page. There are either too many words that I don't understand or the writing/typing is too small.

4/27/2012
Irving/Texas
Marvin
Ms. Bradley/Nimitz High School
To sign a contract and not read it's contains is the most ridiculous thing an individual can do...but it happens every day! I'll admit, I have downloaded a couple of things from websites that have a disclaimer and have never read it. Not because I don't understand what "rights" i'm giving away (though sometimes that is the case) but because I want the app, I want the enjoyment ASAP! I don't want to sit around and read some boring stuff. So, for the protection of the people, there should be a "Privacy Bill of Rights" that can be introduced to project an individual and his or her personal information.

4/27/2012
Irving/Texas
Aubrey G.
Bradley/Nimitz
Smartphone users should have a "Privacy Bill of Rights." The terms of service agreements should be human readable, whether they are read or not. The pop up warning might work, but only if the warning went off when something extremely suspicious was going on. If the pop up goes off for everything then the pop ups will likely be disabled. I have read a privacy policy, I know about all the dangers of not know what you're agreeing too, but it was to difficult to understand and from that point on I basically gave up. Another reason I have given up on reading privacy policies is that they are extremely long; I think that the terms of service agreement should have to be short and simple and it should make every term/condition clear.

4/26/2012
Benson, Arizona
Evan D!
Benson High School
Yes, Terms of Service agreements should be forced to be "human-readable" or just show 10 bullets of the main ideas. Because in modern times almost everything you buy/get online has one. Even when you try to read them they are filled with unnecessary information to make them longer so know one will read it and you'll miss out on hidden fees and exceptions to policies.

4/23/2012
Benson/AZ
Darrel
Sorencen/ Benson
I think that they should be putting the policy into term that all people can understand and they should also have to make it as short as they can without leaving anything out that has to be there by law. This way people wont be agreeing to just let their information out without know what they are doing cause they don't want to read the terms.

4/23/2012
Benson, AZ
Jeannie
Mr. Sorenson/Benson High School
I think smartphone users should have the "Privacy Bill of Rights" because we don't know who's behind closed doors accessing our personal information. I like the idea of having a pop up tell me when someone is digging into my background, because it gives me the freedom to say "No, I don't want someone I don't know to know those things about me."

4/19/2012
benson az
ryan
sorenson benson
yes there shoult be because b they are affecting us so much.

4/19/2012
Benson, Arizona
Josh Martin
Sorenson/Benson High School
Yep. it has become so easy to take advantage of people that way. There should be something written some where a set of rules that cannot be breached. things that have to be done and guaranteeing stuff for everybody. Thank you chace for taking the words right out of my mouth. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

4/19/2012
Benson
Chace
Mr. Sorensen
Yep. it has become so easy to take advantage of people that way. There should be something written some where a set of rules that cannot be breached. things that have to be done and guaranteeing stuff for everybody.

4/18/2012
Benson/AZ
Victoria
Mr. Sorenson/BHS
I believe the smartphone should have a privacy bill of rights, you would'nt want someone to read your text messages and know who your texting or where you live.. its personal. The terms of agreements should be where someone can understand them say your a 13 yr old on your iphone and a pop up comes up your not gonna read something thats 20 pgs long if its narrowed down to 2 paragraphs then people wont mind to read it, also if you make the words understandable people can read it. Idont even really agree that people should be able to access your personal info through your phone, its wrong. But General Harris' idea was somewhat better to try and let you know. Privacy policys are always difficult to understand and most of the time you become un interested in what its saying because you done know

4/18/2012
Benson, AZ
Tori M
Sorensen/Benson High School
I think that they should force to make the Terms of Service agreements should be "human-readble" because most people don't read what they say in the terms. I know for a fact that when I get apps or anything I don't read what they say!

4/18/2012
Benson
Edythe
Mr.Sorensen
No because honestly i dont read the aggrement i just agree without reading it and it would be a waste a time when we want a free app and its something specific we were looking for then we will get it regardless of what the terms do say and we'll except. So na i guess ha

4/18/2012
benson/ Arizona
jonathon sooter
merv sorenson
i believe that we should have the right to privacy even on our mobile devices because we should consent to giving out that information. plus people shouldn't swindle people by having long and complicated contracts that people with out law degrees wouldn't even understand what is being said in the first place.

4/18/2012
AZ
Rayleahna
Sorenson
I believe this article is just making a big deal out of nothing. If I'm going to download an app I simply read the comments that other users say about how it works. This is "human-readable". No one ever reads terms of service agreements.

4/18/2012
benson az
colton
mr sorenson
i think the terms should be easier and shorter to read if this happend some people may find out the true intentions of some of these apps and not play them. a privacy bill of rights is a good idea, but it must be within certian limits.

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