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Is “I (heart) Boobies” protected speech?

October 30, 2013

By Jeremy Quattlebaum, Student Voices staff writer

In August, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided a case that pitted students against the school administration over a thin band of silicone with the phrase “I (heart) boobies.” The wristband was promotional material for the Keep A Breast Foundation, which raises awareness of breast cancer and aims to reduce the stigma attached to the life-threatening illness.

Two middle school students in Easton, Pa., wore the wristbands to school, even though they had been banned. The school said the wristbands were “distracting and demeaning.” The students were suspended and banned from taking part in extracurricular activities.

The American Civil Liberties Union helped the girls file a lawsuit against the school, contending their First Amendment rights had been violated.

The First Amendment “protects schools as a space where students are free to discuss important issues like breast cancer and talk about their bodies in positive terms,” Reggie Shuford, ACLU of Pennsylvania’s executive director, said in a statement.

In a landmark case on student free speech rights, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), the U.S. Supreme Court said symbolic political speech was protected as long as it was not disruptive to the educational process. Students had worn black armbands to school to protest the Vietnam War.

In another student free speech case, Bethel v. Fraser (1986), the Supreme Court ruled that “vulgar, lewd, profane, or plainly offensive speech” was not protected by the First Amendment.

The Supreme Court again sided with the school in the 2007 when it ruled in Morse v. Frederick that a student banner reading “BONG HiTS 4 JESUS” was not political speech and went against the school’s educational mission to teach drug abstinence.

In the recent wristband case, the school said the word “boobies” was demeaning, nonpolitical and vulgar. It argued that the wristbands “conveyed a sexual double entendre that could be harmful and confusing to students of different physical and sexual developmental levels.”

School officials argued that allowing the wristbands opened the door for students to wear offensive and sexualized clothing that would fall under the protection of showing support for cancer patients, even though the slogans could be interpreted as vulgar and therefore not protected speech under Fraser.

The 3rd Circuit Court ruled 9 -5 in favor of the students. In a 74-page opinion, Judge D. Brooks Smith wrote: “As a ‘leading youth focused global breast cancer organization,’ the Keep A Breast Foundation tries to educate thirteen- to thirty-year-old women about breast cancer… And because it believes that young women’s ‘negative body image[s]’ seriously inhibit their awareness of breast cancer, the Foundation’s products often ‘seek to reduce the stigma by speaking to young people in a voice they can relate to.’”

Smith went on to write that while Fraser does allow schools to censor speech that is lewd, it cannot restrict ambiguously lewd speech that is commenting on a social or political issue. With this in mind, the court found that the phrase “I (Heart) boobies” was in fact commenting on a social and political issue, and educating other students in a way that pink ribbons cannot.

The court also rejected the school’s argument that allowing the bracelets would lead to a slippery slope. Smith wrote: “Like all slippery-slope arguments, the School District‘s point can be inverted with equal logical force. If schools can categorically regulate terms like boobies even when the message comments on a social or political issue, schools could eliminate all student speech touching on sex or merely having the potential to offend.”

The Easton Area School District voted to file an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court.

Update: March 10, 2014. The U.S. Supreme Court declines to hear the school district's appeal, meaning the appeals court's ruling in favor of the students stands. 

What do you think?

Do you agree with the court’s ruling that “I (heart) boobies” is protected political speech? Do mildly suggestive messages with political connotations have a place in school? If you were a judge, how would you rule, using decisions in Morse, Bethel and Tinker as precedents? Join the discussion and let us know what you think!
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Comments
2/6/2018
Sidney/Montana
Carson
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that the court’s ruling in favor of the students was the correct decision. The school is not able to regulate messages that are a social or political issue. The I love boobies bracelets falls under this category and is therefore not able to regulate by the school. This makes it different from the Morse v Frederick case as there was no political or social message. The bracelet case is Similar to the Tinker v Des Moines case and the ruling should be the same.

2/5/2018
Sidney/MT
Kyle
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I agree with the court’s ruling to allow the students to wear the wristbands. The bands sport an important message, even if it is using slang to deliver the message. These bracelets didn’t seem to interfere with any students’ education; that is until the school forced the girls to drop their extracurriculars for wearing them. I feel that the bracelets directly relate to the Tinker v Des Moines case, as they are silent, promote a strong message, and are overall not distracting.

2/5/2018
Sidney/Montana
Myka
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I agree with the courts that the "I heart boobies" bracelets are protected political speech. The objective of these bracelets is to spread the support of breast cancer awareness, not to portray sexual references. These supporting objects have a place in school. They do not distract educational purposes, or cause violence. If I were a judge, I would use decisions in Morse, Bethel, and Tinker as precedents to help decide the case.

2/5/2018
Sidney/MT
Breanna
Mr. Faulhaber
I do agree with the court’s ruling that “I (heart) boobies” is protected political speech. Pennsylvania’s executive director, Reggie Shuford said, “The First Amendment protects schools as a space where students are free to discuss important issues like breast cancer and talk about their bodies in positive terms.” Under Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School, symbolic political speech was found to be protected as long as it was not disruptive to the educational process. Although the message may be mildly suggestive, a bracelet cannot cause more disruption to the school’s educational mission than a toot. The bracelets are used to raise breast cancer awareness and reduce the stigma attached to the life-threatening illness. In this case, the bracelets do have a place in school. If I were a judge, I would rule with the students with consideration to the decisions in Morse, Bethel and Tinker as precedents.

2/5/2018
Sidney/MT
Tierney
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I agree with the court’s ruling, “I (heart) boobies” is protected political speech. Wearing these bracelets is very similar to the court case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, where the bracelets, similar to the black armbands, represent symbolic speech. In this case, the students are showing their support for breast cancer victims and aiming to raise awareness, which I think should be allowed. Also, the students wearing these bracelets do not substantially or materially interfere with the work of the school or interfere with the rights of other students, therefore there should be no restrictions to this form of political speech. The bracelets are educating students about breast cancer and the wide-spread issue arisen out of it today, not posing a threat or preventing students from learning. While I don’t think mildly suggestive messages with political connotations have a place in school, this case does not fit into that category. These bracelets are used to educate students and show support for breast cancer victims. The word “boobies” is not on the bracelet to “convey a sexual double entendre” or to cause harm, but rather to get the message across to students about this issue and that it is okay to talk about it. Had I been the judge in this case, I would have made the same ruling as the court did. As I mentioned previously, the bracelets are similar to the symbolic speech shown with the black armbands in Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, therefore students should have the right to wear these in school under the First Amendment.

9/22/2017
Sidney Montana
Tia
Mr Faulhaber/Sidney high
I feel like it should be protected speech cause it is for a good cause

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Lauren
Mr Faulhaber/Sidney High
to be honest with this topic I don't necessarily have a problem with wristbands with things like this because i think its a great way to receive donations for your cause. but again it comes to the issue of if schools have the right to ban anything that they believe falls within the guidelines. so within this whole issue i don't agree with the school of banning these bracelets considering the background of them, but i also believe the school had the right to ban what they thought was inappropriate and or distracting because i do remember seeing these in my school and as people were not taking them in the way they should have been and were being distracted an discussing inappropriate behavior.

9/18/2017
sidney/montana
leonard
Faulhaber/sidney high school
You cannot stop students from wearing I hart boobies because if it is distracting or offence look away don’t give them a chances to make more people join them. Also it is for the awareness of Brest cancer and it shows how the sport the awareness of Brest cancer

9/18/2017
Sidney MT
Kade
Mr. Faulhaber
The bands are for raising awareness for breast cancer so I feel like the court made the right ruling on this case.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Motana
isak
Mr.Faulhaber
I think that the student of any school should be allow the wear these bracelets because they are for breast cancer awareness and the school should be supporting this. I feel that the counts are also rights in this problem

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Patrick Prince
Mr. Faulhaber/SHS
I think that the Supreme Court was right on what they desided. It better to wear pink than it is to wear the bracelet that says I heart boobies.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Torey
Mr. Faulhaber
I agree with the court’s ruling because the bracelets are raising awareness for breast cancer. The bracelets are not taking away from education, rather they are educating the students on the issue of breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
Chase
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I do agree with the court’s ruling. Yes, these messages have a place in school, it is great that they are around and making breast cancer more aware. If I was judge, I would rule the same way, the students have a right to wear the wristbands.

9/18/2017
Sidney Montana
Kyle D.
Mr. Faulhaber
There is a meaning behind the “I heart BOOBIES”, it is for raising awareness of breast cancer and to try to raise money for those affected by it. It isn’t for love of breasts. It is for helping those who want to survive breast cancer, and potentially save lives in the process. I feel that when people try to ban wearing clothing with this logo, that they don’t care enough to think about the cause. There is more behind this than what you read, and I agree with the decision made by the court.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Mt
Alec
Mr. Faulhaber/SidneyHS
I agree with the court's decision. These bracelets are in support of breast cancer awareness, which is a good cause, and should be protected. However, I think that middle schoolers only wear them to be funny and get away with having the word boobies on them. Obviously the kids are not going to donate to help breast cancer awareness at all. I don't think they should wear them, but they have the right to wear them.

9/18/2017
Sidney High School
Kolby
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe the students should be able to wear the bracelets. The bracelets are not distracting to their education. Also, the bracelets are supporting the fight against breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Joe
Mr. Faulhaber / Sidney High School
I agree with the court's decision. Even though the wristbands had a mildly suggestive phrase, I think it was only to make it more memorable. They also did not disrupt any teaching, and they were for a good cause.

9/18/2017
Sidney MT
Cody Davis
Mr.faulhaber/SHS
I stand with the courts decision because it is an expression of free speech even though its in a school environment and has restrictions i still believe that you should be able to express how you feel about a certain situation

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Jarod
Mr.Faulhaber
I agree with the courts that it is a protected political speech, Breast cancer is a real thing its one of the most common cancers in women. little kids need to realize that cancer isn't a joke lots of people die from it. Even is Sidney Montana the schools allowed the bands and that's saying something. So ya I can see where the schools point of view is coming from but there greatly over exaggerating the situation so by all means let the youngsters spread the word because word travels faster in youth then in adulthood. and by the time you get to adulthood it may be to late.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Mt
Max
Mr. Faulhaber/SHS
I believe that the bracelets where supporting a good cause. It is also not that distracting. Most of the time you don't even notice the wristband people are wearing or what they say on them.

9/18/2017
Sidney Mt
Sawyor
Mr. Faulhaber
I agree with the court for declining the school districts appeal. The wrist bands are for raising awareness. The school doesn't have to make it out to be something bad.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Randy
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I think the Supreme Court got this right because the wristbands were just on to raise awareness about breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
Tesa Wieferich
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
The Supreme Court should not ban the "I heart boobies" slogan because we all know the meaning behind this. This slogan is representing breast cancer awareness. If we were to ban this in schools that would mean to limit our rights on free speech or as we call it the FIRST AMENDMENT. This should not even be an issue in schools because everyone around those wearing the wristbands knows what it means. The bracelets do not interfere with the students education and does not uphold lewd or vulgar speech. This issue is very similar to the "Tinker V. Des Moines" court case where students wore the black armbands to protest the Vietnam War. It is their right to wear the armbands and it is their right to wear the wristbands as well. Both of these cases stand for something political or social, and in this case to refer to a very important cause like breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney MT
Waylon
Mr. Faulhaber
I agree with the court as it pertains to protected political speech. In my opinion political messages have a place in school regardless of the topic. To say a message that may be offensive for someone to learn about can not be talked about in a school classroom is ridiculous because it is all about getting ready for the real world and you will hear things that offend you. As a judge I would keep the decision because the bracelets are not a disrupting school or class time.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Jordan
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that students should be able to wear the wristbands if they wish to represent the meaning behind them. The wristbands represent support for the research and treatment for people with breast cancer (well they're supposed to anyways).

9/18/2017
Sidney
Ally
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
The court definitely made the right ruling in this case. I have had family members with cancer so this one really hits home for me. I wore those bracelets and just because the words "Boobies" on them doesn't mean they are for something sexual.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Mt
Chase
Mr. Faulhaber Sidney High School
I very much agree with the court's ruling. The bracelet is in no way offensive with its meaning. If we have a government class, then that means that political connotations are already in school because we are already leaning about politics. It should not change if it should have a place or not just because it has a different meaning or a different objective in teaching.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Mt
Morgan Folstad
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
The "I heart boobies" bracelet should be protected by the first amendment. It is symbolic speech showing the support of breast cancer, not sexual remarks. Therefore, since these bracelets are supporting a top killer in the United States, they should be allowed in schools.

9/18/2017
Sidney
Lauryn
Mr. Faulhaver
I agree with the ruling that the court made. Although the terminology used to show the support of breast cancer awareness was somewhat immature, it was aimed at getting the younger (more immature) generations to realize talking about breast cancer isn't bad. Having these bracelets gets people talking and gets the message out there that even younger generations care about cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney MT
Alexis Smith
MR. Fallhaber Sidney High School
I feel like it is okay to wear these bracelets. A lot of people in my family have had breast cancer so I know what it is like to deal with it first hand. The bracelets could probably be more appropriate but, it was catching the eyes of younger people and hopefully made them think a little. It is for a good cause and didn't cause anyone harm. It was also a fundraiser so they got money in the process. The real reason that they were made for is a good reason.

9/18/2017
Sidney Montana
Riley
Mr. Faulhaber
I think the students are protected if the students are buying them to raise awareness and not just because they say boobies. Our teachers should worry about our education rather than worry about something were wearing. The majority of kids have good intentions and are wearing the bracelets for awareness and support for those fighting breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Trenton
Mr. Faulhaber/sidney high school
The I heart boobies campaign is protected speech. the campaign raises awareness and money for breast cancer. It is protected because there is a meaningful reason behind the campaign witch makes it protected by the first amendment.

9/18/2017
Sidney Montana
Jesse Johnson
Mr.Faulhaber Sidney High School
I think that the bracelets are harmless. It should be protected since it is giving funds to the Breast Cancer associations. There are limits a school can have but saying no to something that helps a big problem in America is an issue in my believe. It definitely should be protected.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Trenton
Mr. Faulhaber/sidney high school
The I heart boobies campaign is protected speech. the campaign raises awareness and money for breast cancer. It is protected because there is a meaningful reason behind the campaign witch makes it protected by the first amendment.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Benjamin Stevens
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
From what I understand, the “I (heart) boobies” speech seems to be protected because it is not necessarily making a disturbance in the learning environment. Someone mentioned that having staff demand kids to remove their wristbands cause a much bigger disturbance in class in comparison. If anything it encourages people to ask and find out what “I (heart) boobies” means and promotes.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Xander
Mr. Faulhaber SHS
I think that the court made the right ruling for this. The bands are for raising awareness and donating funds to those with breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
Danielle
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I don’t think that students should be allowed to wear wristbands to school like that. Just imagine if people started doing the same thing for other cancers, such as ovarian, uterine, cervical, or prostate cancers. There are other ways to show your support for people with breast cancer, such as just a pink wristband.

9/18/2017
Sidney/ Montana
Ben Brodhead
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
The students should be protected. A school should not be able to tell you to take of a little wrist band that is for a cause. The words on the band are for a much bigger cause as it raises money and spreads awareness for breast cancer. Therefore should be protected as political speech. However hard the school tries to put a ban on suggestive messages there is always social media, TV, and other students around them. I believe that the schools should be more worried about what kind of education we (the students) get then what kind of wrist bands we wear to school.

9/18/2017
Sidney - MT
Layne Swigart
Mr. Faulhaber - Sidney High School
I agree with the court's ruling of "I (heart) boobies)" being protected by political speech. Kids are going to be apart of and see worse things than the word "boobies". The bracelets are causing no harm and are supporting a worldwide awareness. It causes more of a distraction for the teacher to make a scene over a bracelet than it does for the student to just wear it.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Hunter Sheehan
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
In this case, I believe the court ruled correctly. The bracelets were part of an organization that educates people on the topic of breast cancer. Students should be educated on topics like that. The wristbands did not cause violence to break and the bracelet dealt with a social issue.

9/18/2017
Sidney/ Montana
Emily Skogen
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney Public Schools
I do not think that these bracelets would cause a disturbance to a class. I think that if a disturbance were to happen it would be in the form of a teacher having to ask him/her to take it off, because they personally feel offended. In Cohan vs. California it says that “If you do not like what is happening to look away”. In this case I feel like if you feel offended by a piece of rubber with words you need to just look away and mind your own. These bracelets are not having any intent of causing immediate violence, and are being bought to raise awareness for Brest Cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney MT
Jordan J
Mr.Faulhaber
I agree with what the court had decided, because they were supporting an organization that did not want breast cancer. For a school administration to ban those is wrong because there is many people out there whose parents or grandparents who have been diagnosed or died from breast cancer and maybe they wanted to support and fight breast cancer. I do understand the fact the school thinks they are sexual or vulgar but only if you make it that way if everyone could just respect what the I heart boobies was made for there would be no problem.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Halie
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I believe that the wristbands only promote knowledge about breast cancer. Although it’s a vivid remark, to have on a bracelet, it is going towards a fundraiser which helps women and men who have gone and who are going through the devastating difficulties of breast cancer. Although the school saw it as “body shaming” and would lead to “negative body images” it’s truly there to help raise awareness for, not only breast cancer, but for all cancer.

9/18/2017
sidney/ montana
jacob
Mr. faulhaber/ sidney high school
The students are protected. shouldn't matter if the students are buying them to help raise awareness. when i was in middle school i had one. even some of the teachers had some of the bracelet. so i they should be protected.

9/18/2017
Sidney Montana
John
Mr. Faulhaber Sidney High School
I agree with the supreme court in this ruling. This wrist band is purely to raise awareness for an important issue in today's society. The phrase is nothing harmful, hurtful, or obscene; the wrist band is only a way for the people trying to spread awareness to the younger generation to seem more easily relateable.

9/18/2017
Sidney/ Montana
Holly
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
A little wordplay suggesting to the idea at hand (breast cancer) is not being disrespectful. It’s raising awareness and money for victims of this disease. Especially being as they were girls who got in trouble for wearing the bracelets, do you really think they were wearing them to disrespect themselves? We shouldn’t have to be cautious of what we say when speaking our minds. The government allows for free expression of speech, and what better way than to say it how is. I don’t see how a bracelet is disrupting the education of students. If younger people can relate to the issue and you can get the word out without being demeaning, then why not try to raise awareness? In a couple weeks, the bracelets will no longer be a big deal and everyone will move on from it, so it’s really not hurting anyone.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
Beau
Mr. Faulhaber
I rule with the Supreme Court. I believe that boobies may be a vulgar word, but honestly it’s a cute and fun way to get the message across. Schools shouldn’t care what’s on your wrist, especially if it’s supporting a serious topic.

9/18/2017
Sidney/ Montana
skylar
Mr. faulhaber / sidney high school
I think that they should be able to wear them because it’s symbolizing breast cancer. and the school should have no say in that

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Jade
Mr. Faulhaber Sidney High School
The I Heart Boobies bracelets are not a distraction and they support a good cause students should be able to wear them in school.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
Jaden
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney high school
“I heart boobies” bracelets are raising awareness for a nationwide issue. It is protected speech. The money from selling these bracelets go towards that awareness. How could a simple bracelet disrupt anyone’s education? It is a simple little wristband. The problem is not the slogan, it’s the teachers who make an even bigger disruption in class by asking the student to take it off. Students are wearing them as support for breast cancer awareness. Why should students not be allowed to support something one of their friends or family members may have went through?

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Kiana
Mr. Faulhaber-Sidney High School
I do agree with the court’s ruling that “I (heart) boobies “is protected political speech. In the article it said the First Amendment “protects schools as a space where students are free to discuss important issues like breast cancer” so therefore I feel as the kids should have a right to wear the bracelets they aren’t harming any students. They are supporting a cause, and if people can’t handle that they should look away.

9/18/2017
Sidney,Mt
Ty
Mr.Faulhaber/Sidney high school
" I heart boobies" i think it is protected speech. it stands for breast cancer which is a nation wide issue. Many people suffer from it and these bracelets and shirts help raise awareness. The money used to buy these goes towards finding a cure for breast cancer.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
Lina Langwald
Mr.Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I don't think that the school should ban “I (heart) boobies” wrist bans because it is a violation of the students freedom of expression. The students are just promoting awareness of breast cancer. Wearing the wrist bands isn’t disruption to the educational process, so the school shouldn’t ban the “I (heart) bobbies” wrist bands.

9/18/2017
Sidney montna
Ashton
Mr.Faulhaber Sidney High School
In this case I strongly agree with the courts ruling because breast cancer awareness is very important to many people and I myself have a pink and white I heart boobies bracelet that I wear every time breast cancer awareness month comes around because my grandmother suffered of breast cancer and this is symbolic speech that cannot be banned.

9/18/2017
Sidney/ Montana
Aarica
Mr. Faulhaber / Sidney High school
The school does not have the right to ban these bracelets. Though the statement is meant to support breast cancer awareness, it is also demeaning and objectifies women. Yes I think it should be allowed in schools since it’s not lewd or sexualized. I don’t think people should wear them at all as the slogans on these bracelets don’t show support for those with breast cancer. I’ve seen these bracelets with everything to “I (heart) Boobies” to “Save the Boobies”. It’s a cop out to say you’re supporting cancer awareness when you’re clothing is saying that breasts are more important than the person with cancer. Forget the Boobies, (heart) the fighter, the survivor.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Peyton
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
Yes, I believe the court ruled correctly in saying that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. The goal was not to corrupt kids with bracelets that have the word "boobies" on them, but to increase breast cancer awareness. Yes, there are some students that probably wear them to cause disruption, but most were them in support of breast cancer awareness. If these bracelets were banned, it could lead to the banning of other items that convey a political message.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Ariana
Mr. Faulhaver/ Sidney High School
I agree with the court’s ruling. “I heart boobies” bracelets are just supporting breast cancer and don’t cause a major disruption in the school. The students were just supporting a cause that they thought was right. The same thing could be said during the Tinker v. Des Moines case where kids wore black arm bands in protest of the Vietnam War. In both cases the bracelets and arm bands didn’t cause an uproar throughout school or incite violence within anyone so I believe the court had the right ruling on the case.

9/18/2017
Sidney Montata
Dalton
Mr. Faulhabar
The school should have never banned the I (heart) boobies wristband. The wristband is an awareness of breast cancer and it aims to reduce the stigma attached to the life threatening illness.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Ryan Horner
Mr.Faulhaber/SHS
In my opinion I don’t agree with the court. In the evidence it states that the wristband were previously banned from the school. The girls still wore them even though they knew that they were banned. I support the girls trying to spread awareness about cancer but there are many ways to accomplish that than lewd or distracting ways. If I was a judge I would side with the school stating that there was already a ban on the wristbands in place.

9/18/2017
Sidney
Jace
Mr. Faulhaber
I think that the court got this case right. I think that the bracelet has a political meaning to it that should make it protected speech. Although I do believe that the kids could possibly find another way to express how they feel about breast cancer, the bracelet should protected speech. If I were the judge I would rule that they can wear the bracelets.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Katie W
SHS Faulhaber
I completely agree with the court on this one, and this is political speech. The bracelet says “ I Heart Boobies” it is for breast cancer, I feel they’re trying to makes something good with the bad. If your middle school students can wear the bracelet without any problems during the school day, but the administration just cannot handle a thirteen year-old supporting breast cancer by wearing a bracelet that says “ I heart Boobies”. Who seems like the bigger person?

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Garrison
Mr. Faulhaber
I agree with the court decision. In all honestly, I don’t believe these bracelets would cause much of a distraction. They may get a few chuckles, but they are nothing substantial. It is a good thing for a student to stand up for something they support, like breast cancer awareness. The main purpose of the bracelets are in fact in support of breast cancer, not just to be funny. Therefore, I agree with the court.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Katie
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that it should be protected speech, which the court also agreed. The message that the wristband was not meant to be a distraction, but it was a sign of awareness. Both men and women need to be aware of breast cancer. If I were a judge, I would agree with the students and not the school. This message wasn't lewd and disruptive.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Josie Langwald
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I think the students should be able to wear the wrist bands because it is raising awareness for breast cancer. The wearing of the wrist bands doesn't violate the schools educational mission. The First Amendment should protect the students to be able to wear the wrist bands.

9/18/2017
Sidney, Montana
Kaelyn
Mr. Faulhaber
I do agree with the court's ruling. Although the bracelets have mildly suggestive language on them, they are trying to bring attention to breast cancer. They should be allowed in school, because it educates children at a young age about breast cancer. The bracelets are a form of symbolic political speech and they should be protected. Also, wearing a bracelet does not disrupt the educational process.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Quinten
Mr.Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I agree that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. It was intended to support breast cancer. They are symbolically showing that they support the aid to end breast cancer. This case is very similar to Tinker v. Des Moines. The students wearing something symbolic to show what they care about.

9/18/2017
Sidney MT
christopher O
Mr.Faulhaber SHS
I agree with the ruling. I think that the speech was promoting breast cancer in a way that pink ribbons don't. I think that the bracelet is for a good cause, also I don't think that the word "Boobies" is vulgar. Therefore the courts ruling made complete logical sense.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Kelly
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I agree that wearing I (heart) boobies to school is protected speech because it helps educate students on breast cancer. If I were a judge I would have ruled that the students have the right to wear the bracelets.

9/18/2017
Sidney/mt.
Avery
Mr. Faulhaber
The I heart boobies bracelet is purchased to support a serious cause. They do not cause a huge disruption, the only disruption is when the administrator points it out and makes it a big deal. There is always going to be the immature kids that buy them just because it has boobies on it, but they are still supporting the cause. The bracelets only have words on them, it’s not like they have actual pictures on them or anything.

9/18/2017
Sidney, MT
Kaitlin Michael
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I think it should be protected because the wristbands are raising awareness for breast cancer. Its showing support for cancer patients, even though it could be interpreted as vulgar, they were not made for the intention to be "sexualized clothing." They should have a place in the schools and should not have to be turned inside out. If I was a judge, I would say that students should be able to support breast cancer in schools by wearing the bands, without being told to take them off.

9/18/2017
Sidney/Montana
Ethan
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I believe that the courts got the ruling correct. The wristbands created a means to start a conversation with female students about the importance of paying attention to their bodies. It also helped to raise money for an organization that was dedicated to assisting in the education of these female students as well as find a cure. Finally, I believe that the bands do not convey a sexual innuendo, but rather have become synonymous with breast cancer awareness.

9/18/2017
Sidney/MT
AJ
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I believe that these bracelets are not a distraction at all. It is simply something to be worn on your wrist. Like a watch.

9/15/2017
sidney/montana
shawn
Mr. Faulhaber/sidney high school
I think that it should be protected because it was promoting Breast Cancer. It was just something someone decided to put on a wristband it has a meaning behind it. Kids bought them for different reason but that is what they were made for. I'm believe that the one that made these wristband that he is donating some of the money back to Breast Cancer Foundation.

9/15/2017
Sidney
Abby
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I don't think the Supreme Court should ban "Heart Boobies"because who cares? I really don't care cuz its just basically saying something about breast cancer. If the Supreme Court says that they want to ban that then they really don't care about women getting breast cancer which is really messed up. Cancer is the number one killer in America.

5/20/2016
Murrieta/CA
Nathaniel
Mr.Jabro/Creekside High School
I do agree with the courts ruling that the said bracelet is a protected form of political speech. This message is supporting breast cancer patients and it has a big place in schools. It does not portray a violent message but they should be allowed to wear this bracelet and not have to take it off. If I was a judge I would allow anyone to wear the said bracelet and they would not have to take it off unless they wanted to, the schools should not make them take the bracelet off because they could be supporting a family member that has breast cancer.

1/5/2016
Sidney, Montana
Coleton
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
The issue at hand here is not one that is being focused on. While I prefer not to take a stance on this, I would really like to point out that school districts find this speech as 'vulgar' and 'ambiguously lewd.' Like, seriously? I mean, I completely understand where schools are coming from, and I would be a little uncomfortable as a school staff member seeing that on wrists. But I also think that it has far deeper meaning than being able to support breast cancer awareness. Like the article says, it allows kids to express themselves and become more comfortable with themselves and others, and middle and high school is the perfect time to do that.

1/5/2016
Sidney, Montana
Robert Horton
Mr. Faulhaber Sidney High School
Yes, I agree with the courts decision. The speech does not evoke violence, it does not demean anyone, and it is not obscene. It is a bracelet used to spread awareness for breast cancer. The word "boobies" isn't profanity and these bracelets don't depict breasts, so what's the big deal? Even if someone is somehow offended they need to suck it up, this is America, we can offend anyone however we please as long as we don't defame, use obscenity, use commercial and seditious speech. As far as schools go, these wristbands only promote awareness, and even if they do open a door to further "offensive" clothing; it doesn't make it okay to ban them. The bracelet doesn't deter a student from learning unless the teacher make a big deal about it.

1/5/2016
Sidney/ Montana
Cayla
Mr. Faulhaber
The students are protected under freedom of speech in the First Amendment. Yes, schools are a special place with a more strict stance on speech if it interferes with their education. These "I heart boobies" bracelets though do not interefere with the students education and doesn't uphold lewd or vulgar speech. These bracelets like the black armbands in Tinker v. Des Moines stand for something political or social. The "I hear Boobies" bracelets aren't like the Morse v. Frederick with the "Bong Hits 4 Jesus" because "I hear boobies" isn't refering to anything sexual but to supporting a very important cause: breast cancer.

1/5/2016
Sidney/Montana
Brianna
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
"I heart boobies" is protected speech. It is raising awareness for a nationwide issue. Many people around the world suffer from breast cancer and these bracelets are raising that awareness. Also, money from these bracelets goes towards finding a cure for breast cancer. Just like in Tinker vs. Des Moines the symbolic speech of the bracelets should be protected because it is not disruptive to the educational process. Teachers who are making students take off the bracelets are causing more of a disruption of class than a student simply wearing a bracelet.

1/5/2016
Sidney/ MT
Harmonie
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
In a case like this, there is always the fear that the kids are wearing the bands just because it says "boobies", but when there is a cause and a meaning to rise awareness there could be a new view. When I was in middle school a group of my friends and I where disappointed that we couldn't raise awareness. So we filled out a petition and took it to the principal to show her that we really wanted to help raise money for the cancer society. When we got the "okay" we took the chance and raised as much money as possible. Throughout the year the hype of the bands were still there because we were promoting how much money we were donating to the local cancer center. And later in the year we ended up finding a sponsership to help make shirts and we sold shirts, we also found smaller pink braided bands that also said "I (heart) Boobies". Our small group recieved a lot of praise in our actions, and it was a great experience. When the school board blows the idea out of proportion it just makes things seem worse, when in all reality we are growing up and will start to handle things more maturely.

1/5/2016
Sidney/ Montana
Amanda
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
The students are protected. What is said on the "thin band of silicone" shouldn't matter if the students are buying them to help raise awareness. There is no substantial disruptance, until the teacher stops class to have the student remove it. In middle school I purchased one of these bracelets and was later told I couldn't wear it. I had to give the bracelet to my teacher who decided to cut it up. I would say that is more of a disruption than me simply wearing the bracelet in support of a family member.

1/5/2016
Sidney Montana
Heather
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I dont see how its a distraction when they are being worn to support cancer. Our teachers should probably worry about our education and not what kind of wristband we are wearing.

1/5/2016
Sidney/ Montana
Taryn
Faulhaber/ Sidney High Scool
In my opinion I think students should be allowed to wear the bracelets because it is supporting an awareness that is common throughout the world today.

1/5/2016
Sidney/Montana
Kelsie
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I strongly believe that these bracelets should be allowed in school. According to Tinker v. Des Moines, symbolic speech is allowed as long as it doesn't cause a substantial disruption. As bracelets, they represent a form of symbolic speech that is protected until it causes a disturbance. People are just supporting a cause when they wear these, and they are not harming or distracting anyone. This is a form of speech that is protected by the First Amendment.

1/5/2016
Sidney, Mt
Matt
Mr. Faulhaber/ SHS
I don't think they've ever been a distraction in our school. We were able to buy them in middle school and i'm sure we made alot of money to help brest cancer awareness.

1/5/2016
Sidney, MT
Jarod
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney HS
I agree with the courts ruling in favor of the students. This same issue occured in my school about 5 years ago, where the school said we couldn't wear these bracelets. Many other students and I were fighting the school saying that these are personal to us having family that has died from various types of cancer and are showing our support to those who are fighting. After my friends and I raised thousands of dollars to donate to the American Cancer Society and our local Cancer Center, the school made the same decision as the court and let students wear the "I (heart) Boobies" wristbands. It was sad that the school wouldn't allow them until we proved to them that they raise awareness and have an educational message to young people.

1/5/2016
Sidney MT
Marcus
Faulhaber/Sidney High School
There are always going to be immature kids who wear the bracelets because they say boobies on them and for the sake of causing a disruption. However, the majority of people wearing them are promoting awareness and support for those battling breast cancer. The only time i have seen these bracelets become an issure during school is when the teacher or administrative figure points is out and stops class to make a student remove it.

1/5/2016
Sidney, MT
Clay Fox
Mr. Faulhaber
The I heart boobies bracelets are promotional items sold to willing buyers in order to support a popular cause. This talk about the bracelets being vulgar is not enough of a reason to ban the bracelets. If you don't like the item, don't buy it. They can not be considered a distraction because they are so small and out of the way. The only time it becomes a distraction is when an over enthusiastic authority figure decides to make it one.

1/5/2016
Sidney, MT
Dylan
Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
Students should have the right to wear the "I (heart) Boobies" bracelets. These bracelets support breast cancer awareness and research. Banning these in school would result in less cancer research funding and less awareness of the cancer.

1/5/2016
Sidney MT
Micala
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that the I heart Boobies bracelets should be allowed to be worn in the schools, it does not cause a distruption and I do agree with some of my classmates when they say that the only become a disruption when teachers make them one. Most people don't even recognize that they are wearing a bracelet, even furthur take the time to read it to see what it says.

1/5/2016
Sidney/MT
Cayden Hecker
Mr.Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I personally have faught for the right to wear theese bracelets in school. The reason i faught for the right to wear them is that they are simply not a distraction. Something as small as a bracelet is not a distraction unless an authority figure sees it and wants to make a big deal about the word "boobies". now i know that some kids are inmature and they can be taken in a very wrong way. But that does not make them a distraction. For every so many inmature kids weraing them there is atleast one that is wearing it in support of the fight against breast cancer. I can say to this day almost 6 years later that i do not wear one of the bracelets. Yes we did win the fight in our school. I didn't fight to wear one i faught to prove that what one authority figure may see as a distraction. may not actually be distracting anyone. My next one i hope to challenge is that wearing a hat in school is no longer seen disrespectful or as a distraction.

1/5/2016
Sidney/Montana
Tel Hermanson
Mr.Faulhaber/Sidney High Schools
I agree with the courts ruling that the "I heart boobies" bracelet is protected by the constitution. Students, through these bracelets, are voicing there support in breast cancer research and awareness. The bracelets are not disrupting in the school setting. The only time they have been known to cause a disruption is when someone complains about them. The wearing of the bracelet can be compared to the wearing of black armbands in the case of Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District. Just because a school does not like a certain word or phrase does not mean they have the constitutional right to say it is not allowed. As long as it stays undisruptive and shows the personnal view of the student then they "I heart boobies" bracelets should be allowed.

1/5/2016
Sidney MT
Trent
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that the i heart boobie wristbands should be allowed to be worn in school. They are not distracting and bring awareness to breast cancer.

1/4/2016
Sidney, MT
Preston
Mr.Faulhaber, Sidney High School
The "i heart boobies" wristbands have been made a big deal by the schools who have banned them. The wristbands have not been a distraction unless the teachers make a big deal about them.

1/4/2016
Sidney Mt
Lucas
Mr. Faulhaber
I do not believe that wearing a wristband that supports breast cancer is distracting nor is it demeaning. If anything it would be the opposite of demeaning. It would probably gain respect from others rather than lose it because wearing something for a greater cause would most likely not make someone lose respect for you. By saying that is distracting is a bit much too because im sure only a handful of people even notice these wristbands. Some of the stuff the teachers wear is more distracting than a silicone bracelet that is supporting a certain type of cancer.

12/2/2015
Sidney, MT
Gunnar
Mr. Faulhaber, SIdney High School
I think that the "i heart boobies" wristbands are harmless and are not going to distract students from getting and education. Unless there are countless students constantly laughing at them and reading them over and over again than there should be no problem wearing them in school. It is pretty similar to the court case "Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District" but they were protesting a war. These wristbands are just raising awareness about breast cancer.

12/2/2015
Sidney, Montana
Chris
Mr. Faulhaber, Sidney High School
I think that if your doing something in support of a greater cause that there should be no issue. Educating young teens about breast cancer is good for them. It would not open a door students know their limits and would not try to push them to far. Breast cancer is a serious thing and the kids are just trying to help. The courts ruled in the right way.

11/24/2015
Sidney, MT
Sadie
Mr. Faulhaber, Sidney High School
The wristbands that state "I Heart Boobies" on them are for breast cancer, breast awareness to make money for those in need. In my opinion there was no reason for the teacher or principle to do what they did and suspended the two kids for wearing and supporting breast cancer. Yes i see that it is a school but truly does it matter so much it says "I Heart Boobies?" In this case the judge made the right decision they are protected by freedom of speech no matter where you are the First Amendment is always in affect.

11/20/2015
Sidney, MT
Kaitlyn Tibbits
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
The Keep A Breast Foundation’s products often seek to reduce popular stigma. They speak to young people in a way they would understand. I agree with the court’s ruling. If I were a judge, I would rule in favor of the students. The school had no right and violated students First Amendment rights.

11/20/2015
Sidney, MT
Dakota
Mr. Faulhaber
I believe that the “I (Heart) Boobies” is protected speech and does not infringe on any one’s rights. It is promotional for a breast cancer foundation and shows support for anybody with cancer. The phrase or anything containing the phrase does not discriminate against anybody or anybody’s religion, nor does it put potential harm on anybody like yelling “fire!” in a crowded movie theater. Although some people see it as vulgar, those same people also tend not to know what this phrase actually stands for.

11/20/2015
Sidney, MT
Hunter Nice
Mr. Faulhaber, Sidney High School
I believe that it is. I used to have a few of these bracelets to support members of my family who have had breast cancer. I don’t see how people think its distracting and demeaning to people. If anything people should be happy that so many others are showing support to breast cancer victims. Also not making a big deal about a bracelet that does show support for something serious.

11/20/2015
Sidney, MT
Clay Fox
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney Highschool
This case is especially easy for me to relate to because of our towns previous involvement in the cause. To me the bracelets are a very creative, and humorous new way for groups like this to reach the younger groups of kids. The main concern here should be with parents and having their kids exposed to that innuendo. Schools can frown upon it but overall the bracelets don’t infringe on any rights of any person and should be protected. Also the money is still going to a good cause that will support breast cancer. Their only fault if any was being creative.

11/19/2015
Sidney/Montana
Bryana Christensen
Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I believe that students have the right to be able to wear I (heart) boobies bracelets. The point of these bracelets is to promote Breast Cancer Awareness, not to offend teachers or students. These bracelets are not "distracting and demeaning." The students are simply trying to be in support of Breast Cancer and being suspended for wearing these bracelets, violated the students right to free speech. In addition, I think that students should be mature enough to handle the word "boobies." Overall, the bracelets are a positive way to raise money for breast cancer.

9/8/2015
Murrieta/California
Daniel
Mr. Jabro
Breast cancer is a very real and devastating illness, which everyone should be aware of. I can understand that the word “boobies” can be offensive, and isn't the most appropriate word for school. However, freedom of speech allows us to express our feelings, and to bring awareness to our community of the fatal illness. The “I (heart) Boobies” foundation is not in support of the use of drugs, or vulgar sexuality in schools, the foundations purpose was to create a catchy phrase that people will notice and remember, to promote the awareness of breast cancer. I do agree with the court’s ruling, and breast cancer should be something that everyone is aware of. Granted, “I (heart) Boobies” isn't the most school appropriate phrase, but it is within our freedom of speech.

9/2/2015
Sidney, MT
Sierra C.
Mr. Fauhlaber/ Sidney High School
I believe students should be able to wear the I (heart) boobies bracelets. They don't do anyone any harm. Those bracelets promote Breast Cancer Awareness just as much as pink ribbons, posters, campaigns, news articles, or TV commercials. If schools ban these bracelets then shouldn't they ban learning about breast cancer, our bodies, and our health? Everyday while walking down the street or out in about around town I see people wearing these bracelets. It doesn't cause any distraction to anyone they encounter. I don't see little kids snickering over the term 'boobies'. Many schools teach breast cancer awareness by promoting ribbon walks, children wearing pink on certain days, teaching about it in class. I believe all students (male or female) should be aware of causes like this. It is a part of life and could happen to anyone. I don't agree with the Morse v. Frederick case in which a banner at school was posted "BONG HiTS 4 JESUS". That took promoting whatever their cause to way over what they should have.

6/5/2015
Stroudsburg PA
Dylan
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg jhs
I think it would be against freedom of speech if they where not allowed to whear the bracelets

5/13/2015
Matthews/NC
Chase
Mrs. Mosley/ David W Butler High School
I agree with the courts ruling. Being suspended for wearing bracelets was a direct violation of their free speech. They are promoting breast cancer awareness in a fun and comical way. Not as a way to promote "Boobies. In my opinion I don't see them as offensive at all.

2/9/2015
Murrieta, CA
Aislynn
Mr. Jabro Creekside High School
Honestly, I believe this is a little far fetched. I went through sexual education in 7th grade. If the schools are so concerned that the word "boobies" is going to provoke vulgar and profane language and actions, they shouldn't allow sexual education in middle school either. These bracelets show support for a good cause. The bracelets are telling youth to go out and do drugs or be intimate with a partner. They are promoting breast cancer awareness. These bracelets don't show pictures of breasts or any other form of nudity so I don't feel there is any reason to ban them from schools. Schools are the places that encourage students to give back to their communities and to be aware of social and political issues so it doesn't make any sense to put a ban on something that does just that.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Casie
Hanna/Steoudsburg JHS
I think the ruling is right. I think it's right because students have freedom of speech, and those i love boobies bracelets are for an orginization. I think the rules should not apply in school. I think it's a positive way to create breat cancer awareness. Instead of just talking about it they can have the awareness with them.

10/25/2014
Charlotte
David
Ms.Mosley/BHS
I believe that students shouldn't wear those wristbands to school. Even though it is for a positive cause teachers might think the students are making a joke about it and get offended by that. If I was a judge I would regulate it but some of the money will go to support people who have Brest Cancer

6/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Xavier D
Me. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I believe students shouldn't be allowed to wear these wristbands to school. Even though they have a positive meaning, other students and teachers may not take it that way. "I heart boobies" is not appropriate for school at all. If I were a judge I wouldn't sue the schools, I wouldn't allow students to wear these bracelets.

6/12/2014
Stroudsburg JHS
Faiz W
Mr Hanna
I think that the that the fact that they got suspended for speaking out for the health of women, in this case breast cancer, is unconstitutional because that violates their freedom of petition right and their freedom of speech right. Also I think it isn't fair that they have to get punished for something that's not wrong. I personally think that the school should get shut down and the teachers either fired nor arrested for this horrible crime. And plis it's not like they are doing anything inappropriate with these things. That's just what I think.

6/12/2014
Stroudsburg
Luke D.
Mr. Hanna/ SJHS
I think it is fine if people talk about this because they are talking about a disease and should be able to talk about their bodies as long as it is in a mature way.

5/27/2014
Matthews, NC
Christian
Mrs.Mosley/Butler High School
The suspension of these students directly violated their freedom of speech. Even though the wristbands have suggestive themes, it is using a comical or playful way of raising breast cancer awareness. They try to make the topic easier to talk about by making it funny and not as serious. If i was judge I would allow kids to wear this in school because it doesn't offend anyone in any way, ( from my point of view).

5/7/2014
Rudyard, MT
Kat
Mrs.Campbell/ North Star High School
The suspension of kids who wear the I (heart) Boobies bracelets is a violation of their freedom of speech. But you have to take in consideration that in school you are a captive audience, which means that you don't have the freedom to just get up and leave when some body offends you, or is wearing something that you find offensive. So our freedom of speech, and freedom of expression is limited in order to provide a comfortable environment in which to learn.

4/15/2014
Frisco,TX
Haley
AdamsCTECenter
I believe the suspension defiantly violated the students right to free speech. The bracelets were simply a different way to raise educational awareness of breast cancer. The word "Boobies" can be skewed and considered inappropriate for school. But if that was the case then every single "lewd" and offensive words that students say would require disciplinary action. Honestly what middle school student has not experienced "lewd" language before? Most of it comes from school…it is completely impossible to make sure all inappropriate language for school is demolished because ones definition of offensive language can be very different from someone else's .

4/10/2014
Frisco,Tx
Fabiha
Adams/CTECenter
I believe that the "I (heart) Boobies!" bracelet should not be banned in schools and they should be protected speech.Because its an effective yet humorous way to spread awareness among children and get their attention on such a serious matter that may soon effect them. The fact that the real reason that these bracelets are worn/made is to support breast cancer.I don't see a logical reason for banning these bracelets when nearly every high school child is required to take health before they graduate and are being educated about male and female body parts including breasts . Also our schools are such strong supporters of various cancers and kids discuss such things in everyday classroom conversation.Therefore i believe these bracelets shouldn't be banned from schools.

4/10/2014
Frisco/ TX
Sydney
Adams/ CTE Center
I totally agree with the court's ruling on this case. The school tried to say that the word "boobies" was lewd but if the bracelet said " i heart breasts" that conveys the same message. This bracelet was made to help with breast cancer awareness, and that is exactly what it did. In public schools, sex ed is taught so why is there such an uproar about a bracelet that is believed to be lewd or provocative? I believe this bracelet was not made to be lewd, but that it was made for the soul purpose of helping out with breast cancer awareness.

4/10/2014
Frisco/ TX
Victoria
Adams/ CTE Centre
While the slogan printed on the wristband might be considered "vulgar" or "offensive", the purpose behind the creation of the wristbands is of innocent nature. In the adolescence population, slogans such as "I Heart Boobies" have to be worded a certain way to produce interest in a topic such as breast cancer. And although many teenagers might use the wristbands for other reasons, they should not be restricted, because they potentially bring awareness to a greater cause, which is protected under freedom of speech.

4/9/2014
Frisco, TX
Sarah
Adams/CTE Center
While the message on the bracelet can be interpreted as lewd and possibly offensive, the political and social message attached to the word "boobies" is the very reason the word is used in the first place. The social stigma about women's bodies' hinders the very real and very important discussion of breast cancer considerably. The shock-factor in the message on the bracelet is meant to incite discussion about a topic, breast cancer, that the school's educational mission does not disagree with. Therefore it should not be restricted.

4/9/2014
Frisco,TX
Ashley
Adams/CTE Center
First and foremost, I agree with the court's ruling on this case. In today's generation it is hard to get students interested in issues on health,politics, or economics unless students have a way of cooperating in a way he/she wishes too. Allowing kids to wear an "I love boobies" bracelet helps bring awareness to an important and common disease,breast cancer, whether the statement is taken in as "vulgar or demeaning". It allows students to be educated and supportive on such a worldwide devastating topic. Whether students are trying to wear these bracelets for awareness purposes or just because everyone else is still brings out the attention to the topic that many women, even some men, suffer from. Students have the right to express themselves and wear what he/she wants to wear especially since the Tinker case was ruled as students being allowed to wear armbands for awareness to the Vietnam War. Even if teachers believe that students are wearing these bracelets not for breast cancer purposes, doesn't enforce the right to ban the bracelets, due to the fact that they are symbols of political speech. "I heart boobies" isn't the most appealing phrase when it comes to school, but is within students right to freedom of speech. It's better to have students raising awareness than being uneducated on such a topic that may effect them one day, their friends, or their family members.

4/9/2014
frisco tx
preston
adams
If the word boobies is banned, then all other "vulgar" words or phrases should be elimated as well, including ones used in sexual education. The wristbands intent is to raise awareness about breast cancer, not of anything that is offensive nature.

4/9/2014
Frisco/Texas
Taylor
Adams/CTE Center
The wrist bands the students wore should be protected under the first amendment rights, because the students can be free to express themselves in a 'legal' way. The bands were purchased to raise awareness for breast cancer and not to be deemed demeaning in any way. Reggie Shuford explained how the students accessories were protected under the First Amendment clause

4/9/2014
Frisco, TX
Sahar
Adams/CTE Center
The "I (heart) Boobies!" bracelet should not be banned in schools and it should be protected. The word "boobies" is a controversial word that could be considered somewhat "suggestive", but in this context, it's none other than to bring light humor into a heavy subject. Students wear these bracelets in order to support Breast Cancer Awareness which falls under freedom expression.

4/9/2014
Frisco/Texas
Taylor
Adams/CTE Center
The wrist bands the students wore should be protected under the first amendment rights, because the students can be free to express themselves in a 'legal' way. The bands were purchased to raise awareness for breast cancer and not to be deemed demeaning in any way. Reggie Shuford explained how the students accessories were protected under the First Amendment clause

4/9/2014
Frisco/TX
Claire
Adams/CTE Center
I agree with the court's ruling of the armbands' protection. These bracelets are hardly suggestive and are used to promote awareness for a life threatening condition. The words that the bracelets depict are not demeaning or inappropriate, they are simply euphemisms for this disease and the organs that are affected. The word "boobies" is not a dirty word. It is a description of a body part that children should grow to respect and understand. There is no reason for banning these bracelets because they provide information to young students and are successful in uniting a large group in awareness of breast cancer.

4/9/2014
Frisco/TX
Claire
Adams/CTE Center
I agree with the court's ruling of the armbands' protection. These bracelets are hardly suggestive and are used to promote awareness for a life threatening condition. The words that the bracelets depict are not demeaning or inappropriate, they are simply euphemisms for this disease and the organs that are affected. The word "boobies" is not a dirty word. It is a description of a body part that children should grow to respect and understand. There is no reason for banning these bracelets because they provide information to young students and are successful in uniting a large group in awareness of breast cancer.

4/9/2014
Frisco, Texas
Andrew
Adams/CTE Center
The I (Heart) Boobies slogan should be considered as protected speech because it's main focus is to raise awareness of breast cancer. It is not used as a vulgar phrase, it is used in a fun way to spread awareness and get the word about breast cancer out into the world. This slogan can easily be taken the wrong way, but it is supporting a good cause.

4/9/2014
Frisco, TX
Charlotte
Adams/ CTE Center
Wearing a "I heart boobies" bracelet, to show your support for the patients fighting breast cancer, should be protected speech. Most organizations that sell merchandise with that symbolic literature on it, represents the encouragement that people are willing to display, to comfort the unfortunate people whom of which have been diagnosed with cancer. Pulling away that encouragement and supporting gustier, can possibly discourage the patients, and take away any hope they had left of pushing through his terrible experience.

4/9/2014
Frisco/Texas
Jacob
Adams/CTE Center
I think "I (heart) boobies" is protected speech. If students want to wear wristbands that supports Keep A Breast Foundation, then they should do it. This event is kinda like the one where a breast survivor put up breast cancer awareness symbols in her home and the neighbor associations told her to put the symbols away. Even though the word "boobies" can be offensive at schools, I feel that it is promoting breast cancer awareness.

3/10/2014
Dixon/CA
Alec
Mr. Hawkins/BCMHS
The issue of what constitutes constructive dialogue is only reliably solved by the logical evaluation of the effects of the speech. In this context, I do not really understand how mentioning boobies in anyway has any effect other than being controversial for its own sake. Otherwise, there would be no reason for speech which could be deemed offensive. It instead becomes and issue of authority being logically inconsistent in both supporting and inhibiting discussion about limited-use secondary sexual characteristics. If speech is used which contradicts school teachings, it is emblematic of either a failure in communication or a failure in the core of what is being taught. In either cases it is a practical issue rather than an ethical one. If messages go against standard government policy, it should be considered in the same manner as any other political movement by the government, albeit with the much smaller democratic clout of an underage person.

12/18/2013
Vacaville/CA
Elizabeth
Hawkins/Buckingham Charter Magnet High School
Many young women have little knowledge about breast cancer beyond what region of the body it affects, and I can count on one hand the number of girls my age I know who would ever think to check themselves for it- let alone know how to. Raising breast cancer awareness could potentially be lifesaving, and it is especially crucial among young people. While they may not be the most effective way to do it, the "I (Heart) Boobies" wristbands spread awareness about the cause, and they are popular among teens. Regarding the argument that the phrase is vulgar or offensive, I disagree ferociously. Breasts- or any other word you wish to describe them with, are not a profane existence and anyone who promotes such an idea is contributing to the already widespread problem of body-shaming. By telling students that the phrase "I (Heart) Boobies" is lewd and inappropriate, schools are encouraging a mindset where the female body is considered shameful, which has ramifications far more severe than just allowing students to wear the wristbands.

12/18/2013
Vacaville, CA
Cotelidah
Mr. Hawkins
I ( Heart ) Boobies bracelet was one of my favorite bracelets of all times especially in Middle school for everyone wore them to support the breast cancer patients or the breast cancer awareness, but honestly I really didn’t pay overall attention to the writing on the bracelet. I ( Heart) Boobies meaning I love boobies, first of all it just sounds wrong and not something that should be sold to children in Middle school or even more worse in Elementary, second of all it’s a breast cancer Awareness bracelet that supports the Breast cancer patients and it says I Heart Boobies, as we all know breast cancer patients when they go through surgery they lose the certain breast that was affected, having those kind of writing words on a bracelet is mostly like mocking them, finally is like making a bracelet with the writing I ( Heart) Hair for Cancer patients who go through Chemo and lose all their hair.

12/18/2013
Vacaville/CA
Marissa
Hawkins/Buckingham Charter Magnet High School
I agree that we all should have the freedom to wear what we wish as a form of self expression, but the “I (heart) Boobies” campaign is only one of good intentions with a distasteful slogan. Yes, it does offend people. And that is why we even have to take into debate whether or not it should be a considered protected speech. In most schools across the country, the dress policy states that choice of attire should not distract from other student’s learning. If that is the case, then should it really be allowed in schools? When we are in professional settings, it really needs to be considered whether what we wear might “infringe” on the well-being of our colleagues. It may bring awareness of breast cancer to the public eye, but it has been abused by immature kids and, now, it brings concern whether it’s an attempt to support the cause, or a status symbol. So, I do believe that it is “protected speech”, but I don’t necessarily believe that it should be allowed in schools.

12/18/2013
Vacaville, CA
Chantal Wake
Mr. Hawkins
In today’s day and age Breast Cancer is a huge problem that many people in the world deal with. Adults and kids alike should be aware of what it is and how they can help. I do agree with the court’s ruling that “I (heart) Boobies” should be protected speech. In the article it says that two girls were suspended and banned from school and any extracurricular activities for wearing bracelets that said “I (heart) Boobies” on their wrists. The school said that they were “distracting and demeaning”. How is this and okay thing to say? We have the right to express ourselves and wear what we want to wear. We should be spreading awareness of breast cancer so that we can find a way to cure it. I personally don’t understand how wearing a bracelet that says “I (heart) Boobies” is demeaning. How does wearing this show you have no dignity or lose the respect of your friends? If anything, it should show that you are supporting a great cause and are helping save lives. So yes, if I were a judge I would make the same decision, to put “I (heart) Boobies” under protected speech. It is the right, and just, thing to do.

12/18/2013
Vacaville/ California
Gabe Loyd
Mr. Hawkins/ Buckingham Charter School
I Heart Boobies should be protected speech because this is a slogan that is used to educate young woman about breast cancer. This slogan is not used as a vulgar phrase but is used to make girls more comfortable with their own bodies and therefore more open to talking about breast cancer with others. This slogan could surely be taken the wrong way but this slogan can help a lot more people than it will offend.

12/18/2013
Vacaville/California
Mason Conner
Mr. Hawkins/Buckingham Charter
I do agree that the “I Heart Boobies” is protected speech. Reasons being is because it’s meant for the fight against breast cancer for women, but it’s promoted to where men can wear the bands and not feel weird or stupid because of the pink colors. “I Heart Boobies” has a wide variety of colored bands so everyone can have their own color. It may sound like a crude and sexually statement, but in reality, it’s a statement for the fight against breast cancer. Another thing, even if it wasn't promoting breast cancer, the kids still have a right to wear them because it’s freedom of speech. Also, since it’s a political thing, the kids have a right to wear them at schools, because it isn't a sexual or crude statement, even though it sounds very misleading. So, “I Heart Boobies” is a protected speech.

12/18/2013
Vacaville, California
Johnny McFadden
Mr. Hawkins/BCMHS
With the right intensions, I would agree that “I (heart) Boobies” is a protected speech. The campaign started as and still is a good cause to spread awareness of the Keep A Breast Foundation. Of course when you give room for immaturity, it will find its way in and things will get out of hand. Kids all over the country started wearing these bands for the comedy and as a perverse statement. This was the reason that the school banded these bands. This article did not clarify if the school was public or private: which makes a huge difference. Assuming it was a private school, which these kids were paying to attend, the school had somewhat of a fair reason to suspend the kids. Private schools are able to create an environment that they see fit for the students attending. The “I (heart) Boobies” bands most likely create an environment where kids were being tempted to act a little more rebellious and a little more disrespectful. If the kids really had a problem with the school’s rules they could have switched to a public school. That being said, intensions good or bad the kids had their freedom of speech. All men are created equal and have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. If these bands made the kids happy, they have the right to wear them. The principle should have respected the kid’s natural rights. However, the circumstances of the school would finalize my decision based on if the kids were at a private or a public school. If the kids were paying for the school they should have respected the principle’s conditions. In the end, these kids raised awareness for the Keep A Breast Foundation so that’s good. I do agree that the “I (heart) Boobies” is protected political speech.

12/18/2013
Vacaville/CA
Matthew H.
Mr. Hawkins/ Buckingham Charter Magnet High School
I agree with the court's ruling that "I (heart) boobies” is protected political speech because it is not “vulgar, lewd, profane, or plainly offensive speech.” The purpose of these wristbands has been and will always be to educate the youth of today bringing awareness about breast cancer. In fact, breast cancer does not pertain to politics in any shape, way, or form. The message may be mildly suggestive because it can be linked to sexuality; however, it is the school's responsibility to educate the student population that these bracelets are appropriate in the context that they are trying to promote awareness about a frightening topic for many people. The Keep a Breast Foundation creates products to reduce the stigma associated with breast cancer by responding in a way that young people can not only relate to but respond to in an effective manner. That is the purpose of this wristband. It is not in existence to convey anything explicit, sexual, or demeaning to anyone. Using decisions in Morse, Bethel and Tinker as precedents, I would rule in favor of the two middle school students.

12/18/2013
Vacaville/California
Morgan
Hawkins/BCMHS
Breast cancer is a very real and devastating illness, which everyone should be aware of. I can understand that the word “boobies” can be offensive, and isn't the most appropriate word for school. However, freedom of speech allows us to express our feelings, and to bring awareness to our community of the fatal illness. The “I (heart) Boobies” foundation is not in support of the use of drugs, or vulgar sexuality in schools, the foundations purpose was to create a catchy phrase that people will notice and remember, to promote the awareness of breast cancer. I do agree with the court’s ruling, and breast cancer should be something that everyone is aware of. Granted, “I (heart) Boobies” isn't the most school appropriate phrase, but it is within our freedom of speech.

12/18/2013
Vacaville, California
Devon
Mr.Hawkins\ B.C.M.H.S
I agree with the 3rd circuit court ruling, for this is a charity work that both raises money and awareness about breast cancer. In our society today, breast cancer has become very common and the “Keep a Breast foundation” came up with a way to get to the youth of our generation by making these bracelets. If it were making a joke out of breast cancer or inappropriate gestures about the subject, I could see where the administration would think that it is “distracting and demeaning”, but that’s just it, it has no direct intention of offending anyone. It is showing your remembrance of all the lives lost from this disease and showing the people that live with this illness day to day, that they are not alone and that we are rooting for them to beet breast cancer. “Keep a Breast Foundation” made these bracelets for support not to make demeaning insults about parts of the body. It lets these people know that were rooting for them to come out of this sickness being a strong individual that they are. When I was in middle school, though I never wore these silicone bands, they had become a fashion statement. I think they even still are today. The point is that the school should not be able to discriminate these bracelets for they are for a good cause and help spread the word about this deadly disease. I personally can see where the school board of education might find this to be “obnoxious” in a sense but it caps a hold of young ones and teaches them what’s really out there. Many young ones know that breast cancer could happen to anyone but they don’t really know what it has potential to do. I could not agree more with the verdict!

12/18/2013
Vacaville / California
Jessica
Hawkins / Buckingham Charter Magnet High School
This topic about wristbands is a very heated one indeed, but let’s looks at what they are really promoting. Judge D. Brooks Smith states that the stigma of young people’s body image should be reduced, and that these wristbands are doing exactly that. “I (heart) Boobies” bracelets were created to support breast cancer research and awareness, and I believe that they were very successful, because they have made it all the way to the courts. Schools shouldn’t have the right to ban them because they were not created to be rude and demeaning, but they were created to help support Keep a Breast Foundation while also erasing that awkward stigma of the female body and informing people that the female body is important. Students do have a right to expression in school, and banning the word ‘boobies’ is childish and ridiculous. Therefore, schools should have no reason to ban a simple bracelet.

12/18/2013
Vacaville, California
Devon
Mr.Hawkins\ B.C.M.H.S
I agree with the 3rd circuit court ruling, for this is a charity work that both raises money and awareness about breast cancer. In our society today, breast cancer has become very common and the “Keep a Breast foundation” came up with a way to get to the youth of our generation by making these bracelets. If it were making a joke out of breast cancer or inappropriate gestures about the subject, I could see where the administration would think that it is “distracting and demeaning”, but that’s just it, it has no direct intention of offending anyone. It is showing your remembrance of all the lives lost from this disease and showing the people that live with this illness day to day, that they are not alone and that we are rooting for them to beet breast cancer. “Keep a Breast Foundation” made these bracelets for support not to make demeaning insults about parts of the body. It lets these people know that were rooting for them to come out of this sickness being a strong individual that they are. When I was in middle school, though I never wore these silicone bands, they had become a fashion statement. I think they even still are today. The point is that the school should not be able to discriminate these bracelets for they are for a good cause and help spread the word about this deadly disease. I personally can see where the school board of education might find this to be “obnoxious” in a sense but it caps a hold of young ones and teaches them what’s really out there. Many young ones know that breast cancer could happen to anyone but they don’t really know what it has potential to do. I could not agree more with the verdict!

12/12/2013
Shoreline/WA
Diana
Knox/Shorewood
Breast cancer is a serious disease that is a relevant issue in today's society. Kids and women alike should become educated about the seriousness of this disease. Whether it be through I (heart) boobies bracelets or presentations, breast cancer is something to be aware of. I personally agree with the courts ruling in saying that the bracelets are a form of protected political speech. Under no circumstances should the bracelets even be considered as "vulgar, lewd, profane, or plainly offensive speech." Rather, the bracelets are a representation of support for breast cancer and they acknowledge the struggles that others may face. It is important to expand the minds of people of all ages to health issues such as breast cancer. If I were a judge I would have ruled in favor of the students based on the previous precedents. In Tinker vs. Des Moines students were allowed to wear black wristbands to protest the war with Vietnam, which is far more political than wearing an I (heart) boobies bracelet. Although it may be uncomfortable to some, to wear those bracelets in my opinion is still legally a form of protected political speech.

12/12/2013
Shoreline
Elise
Shorewood
There are African tribes in which it is not considered abnormal for women to walk around without shirts and in certain parts of Europe it is legal to go topless. Here in America nudity and female body parts have always been a hush hush awkward topic that many people try to avoid or ignore. But simply refusing to acknowledge the fact that women have breasts does not make it untrue or make them go away. It is ridiculous that there is so much taboo over a body part that every women has, we should not still feel uncomfortable saying the name of a simple body part. Now if the wristbands had simply been a trend or were intended to be rude or demeaning, then that would be a whole seperate matter. But they were created and designed for breast cancer awareness and with that intended goal and audience, simply have a band that states a women's body part to keep breast cancer awareness alive should not be deamed inappropriate.

12/12/2013
Shoreline/Washington
AJ B.
Knox/Shorewood
The purpose of wearing an "I (Heart) Boobies" bracelet was to be a way to raise awareness to breast cancer. In the beginning of the campaign, it was a trend that spread out across the youth of America and was a great way of bringing awareness. However, in recent years the act of wearing the bracelet has become more and more facetious as the years have gone on. The point of wearing the bracelet has less intent of bringing awareness to breast cancer and more of intent to be a fashion item. Attributed to this misuse of the bracelet, the act of wearing it should not receive the ability to be worn for free speech. Instead, the profane words and pictures should be able to make the wearing of the bracelet banned in schools if the administrators decide to. Just as guns and gang periphenilia on clotheing are outlawed in schools, the same can be done to the recently fashionable "I (Heart) Boobies" bracelet.

12/12/2013
Virginia
Austyn
Mrs. Bailey/MHS
The word “boobies” can get different reactions from all different age groups, the younger the audience the more humorous they’re bound to find it and that’s just a simple fact. For whatever reason, words used to describe any kind of sexual body part are found as funny to younger (and sometimes older) audiences, and they are often used as tools of humor in movies and books alike. Whether or not this is a good or bad thing, the word “boobies” should really never be found as offensive unless it’s used in a way that would actually be offensive. The word itself is just another way to say breasts, and really there should be no way to find “boobies” alone to be offensive. However, it could easily be seen as rude -or as the school in this case described it- distracting to have the word printed on ones clothing in a sexual way in a classroom full of immature students. The younger, the more distracting, which is why I can see where the school is coming from in this particular situation. Unless the students had been through their own ordeal with breast cancer in some way it’s a bit difficult to trust that they wore the bracelets out of awareness instead of humor, simply because of their young ages. Really though, the issue shouldn't lie with the word, the issue should lie in the meaning. In my personal opinion, the saying itself is demeaning in the first place. It’s objectifying to take away the danger of the disease by making it all about breasts.

12/11/2013
Rudyard/Montana
Melissa
Mrs. Campbell
I agree with the court's ruling that "I (heart) Boobies" is protected political speech. These bracelets are an excellent and effective way to support and make people aware of breast cancer. Wearing them to school allows the company to obtain the focus/interest of the younger age groups. If I were the judge, I would rule the same, students should be able to support positive organizations. The phrase "I (heart) Boobies" is not offensive or disrespectful, therefore should be allowed in schools, as long as it is not disrupting the productivity of the students.

12/4/2013
Charlottesville, VA
Ryan
Ms.Bailey/ Monticello
In my opinion I agree with the courts ruling that "I(heart) Boobies" being protected political speech. They do have a place in school, they are bracelets that support breast caner. They should be able to wear what they want, as long as it is supporting a appropriate meaning.

12/4/2013
Virginia
Kelsey
Bailey/MHS
I agree with the courts that the " i (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. The bracelets are supporting breast cancer and it is a very good cause. There's no harm in wearing them. It's just voicing your opinion and showing that you care about women's health.

11/26/2013
Matthews/NC
Ashley
Mrs.Mosley/ Butler High School
I agree with the court's ruling that"i(heart) boobies" is protected political speech. the bracelet has a meaning, its supporting breast cancer. they should be able to wear what they want because its supporting a major event.

11/26/2013
Mint Hill, NC
Alex P.
Mrs. Mosely, Butler High School
Yes, i agree with the courts ruling because it is helping a better cause. Mildly suggestive messages with political connotations should have a place in school as long as it isn't inappropriate or disrespectful in any way. If i was a judge i would rule in favor of the students because i believe students should be able to express them selves in a way that they want as long as it isn't causing trouble to others.

11/26/2013
Charlotte/NC
Damon
Mrs.Mosley/Butler High School
In my personal opinion the court's had the right to say that "I (heart) boobies" is protected as political speech. Also the bracelet has more meaning, when you put it on, because it shows that you're supporting a major cause that everyone will agree on and be proud to show it. Also the number one hitter.....IT VIOLATED THE 1st AMENDMENT! The students should be able to wear whatever the want without any type of punishment

11/26/2013
Charlotte/NC
cj yin
mosley/butler
I agree with the court's ruling that “I (heart) boobies” is protected political speech. Anything that's not inappropriate should not be banned because of the 1st amendment. If I were the judge, i wont say this case is retarded.

11/26/2013
Matthews/North Carolina
Antonina
Mrs.Mosley/Butler High School
I agree with the court's ruling that "i heart boobies" is protected political speech. I don't think its a big deal for kids to wear those bracelets to school because they know what the bracelets are meant for but kids just like to joke around and a lot of kids buy them so the company gets a lot of money to cure breast cancer. I would have ruled the same way as the judge did because in the case Tinker v. Des Moines, they let the kids wear those black armbands so the Judge should let the kids wear "i heart boobies" bracelets especially when its for a good cause. Also i agree that it is nothing like the case Bethel v. Fraser because the "i heart boobies" bracelets aren't “vulgar, lewd, profane, or plainly offensive speech”, it represents breast cancer and its a creative way of showing support for all the people who have it.

11/26/2013
Matthews/NC
Rebecca O
Mosley/ Butler
In Tinker vs Des Moines the Supreme Court granted the right for students to use symbolic speech in school. These bracelets that are causing a "distraction" could be used for the same reason. Has anyone thought that the teachers are just upset that the bracelets has the word boobies on it. The bracelets do not have and lewd or vulgar language on them so students should be allowed to wear them. Just like the tinkers they could be supporting a cause that helps pay for cancer research. I agree that the "I <3 boobies" bracelets are allowed to be worn in school. Breast cancer is a big deal then why can't students support it?

11/25/2013
mint hill / NC
alexander tobias
mosely /butler high school
1. i think that it was stupid for the school to react the wauy they did 2. yes i do

11/24/2013
Rudyard/MT
Sarah M.
Campbell/North Star
In previous court cases, symbolic political speech has been protected in schools; as long as it isn't lewd, vulgar, or distract others from learning. This is a perfect representation of the First Amendment, and a great law to have. The phrase "I <3 Boobies," is very ambiguous, and hard to place in either the "lewd" or "not lewd" category, so I understand why there is some controversy about it. I personally didn't think they should be worn because any kid who didn't understand what they meant would be very confused. However, after reading the court's reasoning for their ruling against the school, I have to agree with them. That is the slogan that the Keep a Breast Foundation has chosen, and teenage girls understand it, and are more aware of the dangers of Breast cancer. Also, if schools are given too much control over what students can say or do, then they could ban any controversial topic, which would be taking us down a road we do not want to go down.

11/22/2013
Irving/TX
Annabel
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. Although potentially distasteful to an older audience, the phrase is worded in such a way that relates more to a younger audience. This is a good thing because it helps raise awareness about breast cancer among the younger community, "the kids of the future". This being said, I confirm my belief in the place of "mildly suggestive messages" in school, as long as they have educational merit that is.

11/21/2013
Rudyard/Montana
Quinn
Mrs. Campbell/North Star High School
I think "I <3 Boobies" is protected political speech. Anyone wearing anything with this slogan should be protected because they are supporting a cause. If some females feel that this is violating or degrading in any way, they should think about this: Anything bought with this slogan has a part of it's proceeds that goes towards breast cancer research. Cancer.org says that 1 in 36 women will die of breast cancer. This is quite of significant number of people. If you are dissenting towards this slogan and it's meaning, just think about the fact that if you are a female, there is a 1 in 36 chance that you will need the funds that these proceeds raise. Besides this fact, the case was about girls who were wearing these bracelets! They should have the right to talk about their body anyway they want to, and because this isn't a degrading saying, it should be promoted not stuffed out! I strongly agree with the decision and I have full confidence that if this case goes to the U.S. Supreme Court, that the same decision will be made.

11/17/2013
Irving/Texas
Hailey
Bradley/Nimitz
In my opinion, I think “I (heart) boobies” is protected political speech. I don’t see anything wrong with students wearing those bracelets to school because they are just supporting a good cause. The school said that the bracelets were a distraction, but I don’t agree with that either because its just a bracelet, not a light up neon sign. I think the judge made the right decision by siding with the students and allowing them to continue wearing them. If I was a judge I would have ruled each case the exact same way. I agree with letting students wear black bracelets to protest the vietnam war, because its not vulgar and it isn’t a distraction. On the other hand, I think its wrong for students to wear vulgar things to school, so I agree with the judge on those two cases too.

11/15/2013
Irving/Texas
Daniel I.
Bradley/Nimitz
I am in total agreement with the court ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech despite how suggestive and profane it may seem. So long as the message is a good one, I think that suggestive messages with political connotations are okay in school. If I were a judge I would have ruled the same way that this judge ruled on this case. I would rule the same as Judge D. Brooks Smith because it isn't the same as the "vulgar, led, profane, and plainly offensive speech" of the Bethel v. Fraser case.

11/15/2013
Benson, AZ
Chandler, Sami, Somer
Benson Union High School
I believe that students should be able to wear I (heart) boobies bracelets because it is allowing students to say that they support the cure for breast cancer. Its a freedom of speech and why should the school board be able to take the first amendment away from us. So I think we should be able to wear what we want, also there is nothing vulgar on the bracelet at all. Just because one person doesn't approve it doesn't mean we have to give it up. Its our right and I think we should stand by it.

11/15/2013
Irving/Texas
Viviana
Bradley/Nimitz
I am in favor of the court's ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. This phrase, which mainly appears on wrist bands, is doing nothing but raising awareness of breast cancer. The bracelets shouldn't be banned from school for this reason- they deal with a social issue and are promotional materials for the Keep A Breast Foundation. These wristbands are not "demeaning, nonpolitical, and vulgar" at all- like Judge D. Brooks Smith said, "I (heart) boobies" is just worded the way it is to be able to speak to young people. As long as they don't prevent students from learning, these wristbands should be allowed in school. If I was a judge, I would declare the bracelets under protected speech by mentioning that they're not being a distraction to anyone's education, they don't include any actual "vulgarity," and that they don't go against the school's regulations since they're just showing support for cancer patients.

11/15/2013
Irving/TX
Yamilleth
Bradley/Nimitz
Yes I agree because the 'I heart boobies' foundation is an organization raising awareness about breast cancer. The word "boobies" is not a demeaning word, yeah its a childish name for a body part of a woman, but the cooperation was going for a way to advertise breast cancer awareness in a bold way. By making such a lewd statement, it captures the attention of the youth, and shocks the adults, but once everyone realizes what the meaning behind the wristband means, they all start to educate themselves about what the whole foundation is about, how to help woman in their fight against breast cancer, etc. The company was trying to raise awareness in a way that the youth would remember and know about breast cancer. The Fraser law states that a complete lewd statement would be diminished in schools, but the wristbands support a foundation, that brings awareness to breast cancer, and can cause even more awareness in the mega of youth: schools. Schools need to realize that censoring the word "boobies" from a teen's vocabulary does not mean that they are learning how to respect a woman, its just encourages the youth to feel ashamed or wrong about a their body parts. Instead of schools getting offended by a word that labels a the body part of a woman, they should teach young teenagers about how to respect one another, help the campaign by informing teens on breast cancer, and how they can help, and getting more in depth in sex ed classes, so that a simple word like "boobies" wont be the butt of a joke and help the teens mature.

11/15/2013
az benson
tanya
sorenson
I believe that students should not wear I heart boobies because Ithink that it is inappropriate for children to wear them in school. I think it is wrong for men to wear I heart boobies because they don't have any and I think it is all sexual.

11/15/2013
Irving/Tx
Alonzo
Bradley/Nimitz
I see nothing wrong with the "I love boobies" bracelet. As a matter of fact it's doing good instead of bad in my opinion. I own one of those bracelets and I don't use just for fashion or whatever, to raise breast cancer awareness. I agree with the courts decision of ruling " I love boobies" as a protected political speech. People should be able to express their feeling about breast cancer however they want. If people aren't mature enough to wear them without any inappropriate thoughts that's their problem. The school did a good job enforcing their rules but I think they might have gone overboard. I'm not saying to let them walk around breaking their rules but to warn the students or take smaller action before giving a bigger punishment. If I we're judge I would take into consideration how they have their freedom of speech and expression. I would allow them to support what they want to support.

11/14/2013
Irving/Texas
Jose A.
Bradley/Nimitz
I completely support the court’s ruling that “I heart boobies” is a protective political speech because people of all ages should be able to show their complete support for something they believe in. If the school thinks that kids aren’t mature enough to handle the bracelets then they should give them simple warnings before taking action. Of course mildly suggestive connotations have a place for school. How else would student council members, club/organizations, and even prom queens and kings get the attention of their huge school population. I believe that using this type of advertising would be the most effective in a ny system really. Why? Because it quickly grabs the reader’s attention and forces them to think/form an opinion on a topic. As a judge, I’d carefully examine the school’s past history with similar material and take into huge consideration what the school has to say about the subject. After all, they’re upfront and personal with the students everyday. Then I’d consult with the other judges. However, if after all the research my view doesn’t change then I’d stay in favor of the girl’s side of the story.

11/14/2013
Irving/TX
Joseph C.
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the court ruling of the phrase "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. I think there is nothing wrong with students supporting a deadly disease at school. Political connotations can be very educational for the students, and may teach them something they do not know. If I were a judge I would have made the same decision because I personally know what its like to have cancer. Although I had a different kind, its still a horrible disease, and should be widely supported.

11/14/2013
Irving/Texas
Roberto S
Bradley/Nimitz Hs
I feel like the court's had the right to say that "I (heart) boobies" is protected as political speech. Also the bracelet has more meaning, when you put it on, because it shows that you're supporting a major cause that everyone will agree on and be proud to show it.

11/14/2013
Irving/Texas
Rudy
Bradley/Nimitz
The Supreme Court’s decision is completely valid. “I Heart Boobies.” may be offensive to some but it gets the message across. These modern messages should be allowed in school. School systems need to catch up with the rest of society and realize that people are more direct in communicating today. Had I been a judge in this case, I would have ruled in favor of the students. I also disagree with the Court’s decision in the Tinker vs. Des Moines case. Symbolic speech is protected by the first amendment,but those arm bands did not disrupt the learning process. I do, however, agree with the Supreme Court in the Morse vs. Frederick case. Unlike the black armbands, the sign, “Bong HiTS 4 Jesus” referenced drugs in a positive light. No matter the right, that is wrong and could be dangerous.

11/14/2013
Irving/TX.
Sergio G
Bradley/Irving
With my twelve years in school I have realized that schools just like my school district react in great panic to little problems that should not even be created. I believe this slogan should really not be considered much of a political speech because in reality most students use this as more as a trend then a stand to support this problem. With saying that doesn't mean I believe they should be banned though because if you look at the positives in this you will notice how much money this is producing for cancer foundations. If stuff like this was banned these foundations would loose great amount of money, so after all this if I was a judge I would over rule the school because I believe this would help the community would help the community more and is really protected with the first amendment.

11/14/2013
Irving, Texas
Jacob F
Bradley/Nimitz
In this case, I do not agree with the school or the students. The "I (heart) boobies" bracelets are used to raise breast cancer awareness, but as hormonal teenagers, I do not think that one can handle the word "boobies" without giving it a sexual connotation. In regards to the students being suspended, the students knew that their school had banned the bracelets, so they knew that they would face a consequence for wearing the bracelets after they had been banned. The students could have worn pink clothing or even pink ribbons, common symbols for breast cancer awareness, instead of the bracelets. I do not believe that the bracelets' saying can be protected political speech; at least not in a school setting, where there are certain dress and conduct codes that need to be followed.

11/14/2013
Irving/ Texas
Emily
Bradley/Nimitz
I have an "I <3 Boobies" bracelet and I have never found it to be perverted or inappropriate. I have been raising breast cancer awareness by wearing it. I am happy the court decided that the "I (heart) Boobies" is a protected speech. The meaning behind the slogan is pure and It wasn't meant to be inappropriate. Breast Cancer Is a serious problem and instead of wasting time figuring out if we should band the bracelets we should worry about finding a cure!

11/14/2013
Irving/Texas
Lyndsey
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the court's ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech. It is supporting something that has affected so many lives in America and across the globe. Students should know about breast cancer and any other cancers. If I were a judge I would definitely let these kids wear the bracelet. It doesn't have any "vulgar, lewd, profane, or plainly offensive speech" like they other cases did. I thin that the school made too big of a deal about these bracelets and the courts made a good decision.

11/14/2013
Irving, TX
Jesus Gonzalez
Bradley/Nimitz HS
I believe that "I hear boobies" should be protected by political speech.This does give mildly messages in our school causing some people to be offended.I think I would make them express their way of supporting cancer a different way because their are other ways to do this.

11/13/2013
Irving/TX
Reyanna
Bradley/Nimitz
I do think that " i heart boobies ' is protected political speech. This is simply promoting breast cancer in a way that can easily spread around the world. I can understand that the slogan can be offensive to others and can be interpreted as vulgar. If i were the judge in this case, I would allow for the bracelets to be worn in school. I don't see a problem with the students wearing them. I think that the judge ruled correctly in the Bethel vs. Fraser case.

11/12/2013
Irving/TX
Brandon
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the court’s ruling that “I <3 boobies” is protected political speech. Although the slogan could be seen as demeaning and vulgar, the bracelet is promoting breast cancer awareness. And because its job is solely to raise awareness, the bracelet should be allowed in school. If I was a judge, I’d rule the same as Judge D. Brooks Smith as it isn’t in any way comparable to the “vulgar, lewd, profane, and plainly offensive speech” of the Bethel v. Fraser case.

11/11/2013
Irving/Tx
Hannah W.
Bradley/Nimitz
I think that the court decision about the "i (heart) boobies" is considered a protected political speech, because even though they have put standing up for breast cancer in a certain way that might not be accepted to some people, doesn't mean that they are not standing up for it at all. Yes, should they have restated it but they are just trying to get a point across that they support the cure for breast cancer. I think that when it comes to school and they way you talk and how you support certain things. If I were to be the judge I would look at in both ways, I would consider that it was a way to express your self and the things you believe in.

11/11/2013
Irving/Texas
Leanna
Bradley/Nimitz
I think that "I (heart) Boobies" is a protected speech. It's a slogan and promotion of the Keep A Breast Foundation. There's nothing wrong with the Keep A Breast Foundation being promoted at schools. I would rule the "I (heart) Boobies" as a protected speech. Even though it is thought to be a vulgar and crude phrase, it's a completely acceptable promotion, and it shouldn't have a punishment for wearing the bracelets.

11/9/2013
Irving/TX
Imbri
Bradley/Nimitz
"I (heart ) Boobies" wristbands should definitely be considered protected political speech. I'm glad that the Supreme Court is finally ruling in favor of the progressive generation. The wristbands promote awareness and support of the breast cancer cause. I find it ridiculous that this was even brought to the nation's attention. It makes me realize that maybe America hasn't progressed as far as I'd like to think we have since the 1970's civil rights movement. The real problem, and I mean the really really disturbing thing about all this is that it implies that government institutions such as schools want to believe that the teenage generation doesn't know what breasts are, or is only only capable of referring to them in a derogatory manner. I am offended.

11/8/2013
Irving/tx
Elizabeth C.
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the courts ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is a protected speech because it reffers to breast cancer and that is a political issue. Although some adults may think that the slogan seems a bit innaproporate, the slogan catches the eye of the younger crowd which leads to them to become more educated on breast cancer awareness. With that being said , the bracelets should NOT be banned from school. In my opinion if the bracelet is promoting awareness of breast cancer then the outloo should not matter,after all it is being used to simply educate people. When you look at the other court cases on can see that the bracelet is under protected speech because it not distracting the learning environment or of the students. Overall I believe as long the bracelet should be allowed in school because it is referring to a social issue in a fun and creative way.

11/8/2013
Irving/TX
Aaron
Bradley/Nimitz
First and foremost, I agree that the "I (heart) boobies" is protected speech and should not be considered to be lewd and/or inappopriate due to it being a simple supporting statement on breast cancer awareness. Now, I understand (despite not supporting) how some may find the statement to be "Crude" or "Offensive," but I mean, come on. In this day and age, is the phrase really pushing the limit on what's considered to be appropriate? Its intentions were/are to educate, not distract----because of this, I feel its usage should be allowed and, outside of its message and meaning, should not be taken in so uptightly, as its intents are nothing of an inappropriate nature.

11/8/2013
Irving/Tx
Jordan B.
Bradley/Nimitz
“I have free speech” is something we hear quite often. If we think about it though do we really? The I (heart) boobies bracelet is something toward cancer, but it has been perceived as distasteful or corruptive. But it’s being bought and worn to support breast cancer, which if i might say is a cancer that KILLS. If they are so worried about corruption why not just take away our T.V’s because I don't know about you, but that definitely corrupts us. If I was any of them (judges) I would have ruled just like they did. This is our way of supporting, and if we get stripped of that now, what else will follow in the future.

11/8/2013
Irving/Tx
Pedro
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the court's ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech because it's a phrase that is supporting a social issue. Despite the fact that the phrase might be a little demeaning, the proceeds from the purchases of the wristbands goes towards providing money for research to be done on breast cancer and the wristbands themselves help raise awareness. I believe that mildly suggestive messages with political connotations have a place in school as long as it doesn't have profanity. If I was a judge, I would rule in favor of the students because the wristbands cause no harm and fulfill their purpose of raising awareness. When I first saw my cousin wearing one of those wristbands a couple of years ago, I didn't know what it meant and so I asked her and learned that the wristband was raising awareness of breast cancer while providing funds for the Keep A Breast foundation. I think that if people knew that the wristbands were raising awareness of breast cancer, there wouldn't be a problem.

11/8/2013
Irving/Tx
Miriam
Bradley/Nimitz
The “ I (heart) Boobies” is protected. It is not a vulgar or crude phrase. The world doesn’t alway put things in technical term, instead they use the common words that the public is familiar with. School shouldn’t shelter students from how the world really is. Mildly suggestive words with political or social connotations should be allowed to be used at school. Students should have the right to spread their personal knowledge and message. The “I (Heart) boobies” is the equivalent of a pink ribbon. The only difference is that one uses words to the convey the same social message as the other. If I were the judge I would have ruled the same because the students aren’t exhibiting “vulgar,lewd, or offensive” speech. They are demonstrating their awareness of a social issue and it isn’t cause a disruption in the class room.

11/7/2013
Irving/Texas
Chadwick
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree "I (heart) boobies" is protected speech as it is referring to a political or social issue. While the slogan may be viewed differently and inferred to have different meaning, considering this speech is closer to the natural lingo of the target audience the Keep a Breast Foundation is trying to connect with, there is no reason for the bracelets to be banned from school. The bracelet is promoting awareness of breast cancer and while it may have a suggestive outlook, because its motive is to educate and not distract, the bracelet should be allowed. Based on previous court cases, the bracelet is under protected speech because it isn't distracting the education process of the school or demeaning the schools mission in educating students, like the Morse v. Frederick court case, "BONG HiTS 4 JESUS"-undermining the school's drug free policy, and it isn't "vulgar, lewd, profane, and plainly offensive speech"- found to not be protected by the First Amendment in the Bethel v. Fraser (1986) court case. Overall I believe as long as the bracelet is not distracting students from learning in the classroom every day, the bracelet should be allowed in school for the fact it is referring to a social issue without being profane or derogatory.

11/7/2013
Irving/Texas
Cyndel
Bradley/Nimitz
The “I (heart) Boobies” phrase was that meant to encourage and promote Breast Cancer Awareness and support the Keep A Breast Foundation. I do not believe it should of have gone as far as the Supreme Court.It isn't vulgar or degrading. It is a way to show respect and encouragement to those who need it. If some people aren't mature enough to wear them or hear/see those kinds of words on a simple piece of plastic then that is their personal issue. The students should be able to give honor and respect to those who need it and earned it.I would allow it because students should be able to show their respects and have the ability to grow up and use the words correctly.By telling them that they aren't allowed to use them we are creating rebellion which will only lead to vulgarity and degradation in both parts.

11/6/2013
Irving/Tx
Marissa
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the court's ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is protected political speech because it regards awareness for breast cancer which is a political issue that is covered under the First Amendment Rights in the Constitution. I feel like the school was going over board when suggesting that the phrase was appealing to sex in which they are trying to encourage the students to stray away from. Though, like Judge D. Brooks said,' that the Keep A Breast Cancer Foundation tries to educate thirteen- to thirty- year- old women about breast cancer' therefore the phrase "I (heart) boobies" is made in a way for students/people of younger ages to understand and support the cause. I believe that the issue isn't that serious and is perfectly fine to be present in school environments.

11/6/2013
Watertown/Mass
Alistair
Rimas/Watertown High School
I think that the school was being overly sensitive, if it was a slogan on a t-shirt in neon letters it would be a different story, but do to the fact that it was a slip of plastic worn in a wristband then it could barely count as distracting, a watch could be banned for the exact same reason, some students might wear them as jokes but it would be immature as most middle schoolers are.

11/6/2013
Irving/Texas
Sarah M.
Bradley/Nimitz
The first time I saw a boy wearing one of these bracelets was during my freshman year at High School. What first came to my mind was that the bracelet was vulgar, and inappropriate. I would have NEVER thought it was to promote breast cancer awareness. I started to see more people wearing the bracelet, and I remember thinking to myself that it was trashy. When I was told what the bracelet represented, I thought that was a really bad way to advertise awareness. Kids today don't have matured minds. They don't hear the word 'boobies' and associate it with anything that is appropriate. This may not have been such a big deal if it were not for the fact that we know what goes on in the mind of a teenager. It was also quite obvious to me, as a student, that these kids could have cared less about breast cancer awareness. School is supposed to be a place of formal learning, and words like 'boobies' are not something you would ever hear a teacher say. While I agree with the fact that this case should have never gotten to the Supreme Court, I don't agree with the judges decisions. Just because you want to get rid of a vulgar version of a word, doesn't mean you are trying to avoid the subject of sex altogether. When in school, students may think they have freedom of speech, but there are plenty of things you could say and get into trouble for. I see no problem with wearing the bracelet outside of school, but inside of a learning environment, it's not very appropriate.

11/5/2013
Irving/Texas
Kristiyan
Bradley/Nimitz
The “I (heart) Boobies” phrase is simply a line that encourages and supports the Keep A Breast Foundation. First of all, this should never have gone as far as the Supreme Court just because a few students decided to wear a bracelet that doesn't even promote anything that is vulgar and negative. Therefore, I totally agree with the court's ruling that the “I (heart) Boobies” is a protected speech. I have seen young as well as older people wear these bracelets around and it is shows that some people actually care and rally around each other for a great cause such as fighting breast cancer. It is simply a band of silicone which allows the people to come together and when someone tries to argue and make a big deal out of that, it is quite ridiculous to take it as far as suspending and banning students from activities and their education in general. Second of all what bothers me is that politics have to be involved and brought up with simply things like wristbands. Schools should be able to control what kinds of messages they want their students to show in order to represent the school the right way as well as to keep kids within appropriate manners and borders. If I was the judge who would have the opportunity to decide upon this case, I would allow the bracelets in schools because they are for a good cause and support women who struggle with and are fighting breast cancer as well as for survival.

11/5/2013
Irving/Texas
Daniel S.
Bradley/Nimitz
The "I (heart) Boobies" bracelets represent the Keep A Breast Foundation in a positive manner. This simple band of silicone should never have been a big issue, never-the-less should it have gone as far as the supreme court! This wristband promotes breast cancer awareness and I support the judges ruling that our 1st Amendment rights should be upheld. I mean the term "I (heart) Boobies" isn't used in a negative or vulgar sense, rather it is a slogan that helps promote cancer to teens by wearing it in a visible place such as your wrist. I believe if other teens see others wearing these bracelets regardless of thinking they will want to wear them as well. The fad is going around and even if kids are wearing the bracelets for the wrong reasons, just by wearing the simple slogan helps spread the idea of fighting breast cancer. The word "Boobies" in this context is used in support of breast cancer and is by no means a vulgar demeaning term. The judge was right to shut down the school's logic and grant the students their protected right of free speech(with regards to it being in the sense that it pertains to a social/ political issue). As long as someone has something important to say I believe their right of free speech should always be upheld when threatened by an unaware non factor party. A large majority, such as a group of students, definitely has more power than a school district causing problems on small issues. Like I stated previously, this issue could have been resolved without the help of the supreme court ruling.

11/5/2013
Irving/Texas
Scotty C.
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the court's ruling on this case. The Keep A Breast Foundation is just trying to relate to a younger audience, as well as create a brand that supports and rallies around those who are fighting breast cancer. Schools need to get in the real world on many issues and stop trying to block anything and everything that's somewhat not politically correct. This case is much different than the Morse, Bethel, and Tinker case, because those cases were against many individuals moral beliefs. I'm positive that almost every individual is willing to stand behind those fighting breast cancer, and will support any organization that is doing the same.

11/5/2013
Irving/Texas
Monica M. M.
Bradley/Nimitz
The “I (heart) Boobies” bracelet should have never appeared in a court. It’s support towards awareness of breast cancer the same as the pink ribbons do. I agree with the court’s decision. The biggest supporters, besides famous people, are the teenagers. We are involved in many school activities in order to benefit those who have been affected by cancer and it also raises awareness in our school. The First Amendment rights of the two students were violated even if the school had a point. The term “boobies” can be inappropriate on school grounds and confusing to students of different physical and sexual levels however, it can be “inverted with equal logical force.” The bracelets were the first to state in a object, with designs, what they supported. Just because the pink ribbons do not state it straight forward does not mean there is a difference between the two. It’s all for those affected by any type of cancer found therefore the bracelets should not be a problem if it’s raising all the awareness it can. The more people involved the better for everyone. My ruling would go towards the two students considering there was no lewd or offensive speech toward anyone. There was no harm whatsoever in this court case it was a simple gesture of support.

11/4/2013
Irving/Texas
David W.
Bradley/Nimitz HS
I agree with the court's ruling that "I (heart) boobies" is a protected political speech. Although the slogan could hint at a more sexual meaning, the purpose of the armbands is to raise awareness for breast cancer - a very large social and political issue today. Therefore, since the ambiguously lewd slogan is in reference to a social/political issue, the school cannot restrict it in any way. I would have ruled the same as Judge D. Brooks Smith for the same reasons he ruled in favor of the students.

11/4/2013
Irving/Texas
Christian S
Bradley/Nimitz
Yes I agree with the courts ruling technically he was not messing with anyone and the school took it the wrong way.Because boobies is not even a profane or bad way to say or mean breasts now a days everything offends everyone and in the future just criticizing something will offend someone.And yes i would because they are good things to references.

11/4/2013
Irving/Tx
Brian J.
Bradley/Nimitz
Times have changed since the Morse, Bethel and Tinker cases. Suggestive slogans and wordings are apart of our everyday society. I agree with the court's ruling on the fact that "I (heart) boobies" should be protected speech. Even if the wording may seem a bit suggestive and profane, the meaning behind it is sound and reasonable. Even in school these things should be allowed so the younger generation can be taught what's going on in our society now with a way that they can understand easier. Times have changed, and we are going to have accept that and let more "profane" things go.

11/4/2013
Irving/Texas
Teven
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the supreme court's ruling in this case. Though the statement "I (heart) boobies" could be interpreted as a double entendre, it's political and social agenda is all the stronger for it. Statement such as these, though they may be suggestive, should have a place in schools so that students may begin to develop opinions of their own on social and political issues. Were I a judge, I would have voted in favor of the students under the same explanation that Judge D. Brooks Smith used.

11/1/2013
Kansas
Quentan
Mr. Lucas
Given the circumstances I believe the court will rule in favor for the students for I think the school reacted to excessively and extreme and the students were not distracting anybody within he school environment

11/1/2013
Effigham/Kansas
Haley
Mr. Lucas/ ACCHS
I think that the Supreme Court will hear this case and rule in favor of the students. By hearing this case will update Tinker v. Des Moines and the "slippery slope" the school states will be an issue if rule in favor of the students will actually not be that much of a problem.

11/1/2013
Kansas
Michael
Mr. Lucas
The wristbands should be protected because the speech is not exceptionally vulgar, and if more anatomically correct terms would use it would increase the vulgarity of the message. Not only this but the bracelets are not an extremely noticeable on person, and furthermore schools are an area were speech that brings awareness to a situation is acceptable.

11/1/2013
Effingham, Kansas
Ashley
Lucas/ACCHS
I think that the Supreme Court will hear this case, due to the fact that it is similar to Tinker v. Des Moines. If the Court does hear it, and it rules against the students, this case would be an update from the thirty year old Tinker case. However, I think the Court would rule against the school, and for the students.

11/1/2013
Effingham
Bridgett
Mr. Lucas
I believe that the students are in the right. The speech is protected and the bracelets do not disrupt the classroom. The school does not have the right to tell them to take the bracelets off.

11/1/2013
KS
Caleb
D. C. Lucas
I believe that the schools should not, in fact, ban the bracelets, for many reasons, however mainly due to the fact that if the district were to ban the 'I heart boobies' wrists bands, then they would have to ban many other similar things just to be fair. The balance of justice is teetering on the edge of a slippy slope. I also believe, personally, that this ban would, infringe upon the first amendment rights of the students.

11/1/2013
Effingham KS
Tina
Lucas/ACCHS
This should be protected under freedom of speech. It's a political and personal issue.

11/1/2013
Kansas
Rebecca
ACCHS
I agree with the students on this because it shouldn't be that big of deal of having a bracelet of I heart boobies. It represent for breast cancer awareness. Adults are responsible for the students. They put in these students heads that it is bad of having a braclet saying that it's not right at all. It should be allowed, the more support for breast cancer the more hope you get.

11/1/2013
Lancaster/Kansas
Layne
Lucas/ACCHS
I am on the kids side. If they want to where the wristbands they can. The school seems comes off a little strict on the kids. Now if it becomes a problem and they show immaturity towards the words "boobies", then they can make some kind of rule. It kind of depends on the age of the kids.

11/1/2013
Effingham/Kansas
Jenna
Atchison County Community
I have been in a school where these bracelets were banned and I do not think it is a good idea. All it is doing is supporting breast cancer. People make such a big deal out of the little things instead of worrying about much larger conflicts in schools.

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