Speak Outs
Speak Out
Can police search your cellphone without a warrant?

Sept. 4, 2014

By Lauren Hawkins, Student Voices staff writer

Imagine an entire catalog of your life in the last year could fit into your pocket. It contains a list of all the conversations you’ve had, all of the things you’re interested in, and all of the places you’ve been. It has pictures from your best friend’s birthday party, your last soccer game, and your vacation to the beach. Does this imaginary catalog sound familiar? If you have a cellphone, you carry all these things and more with you every day, but you probably don’t want people to see them without your permission. In general, your information is legally protected from unwanted snooping. But what if police suspect your phone holds evidence connecting you to a crime? Should police be able search your cellphone without a warrant?

The Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling this summer on two cases concerning this question was clear. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote in the opinion: “The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought. Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cellphone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple – get a warrant.”

In 2009, David Leon Riley was pulled over for driving with an expired vehicle registration and arrested for driving with a suspended license. Police found firearms in the trunk of his car and linked him to a shooting earlier in the month using photographs saved on his cellphone. He was charged with attempted murder and sentenced to 15 years to life in prison. In 2007, police found Brima Wurie’s home address using pictures and contacts from his flip phone when he was arrested for allegedly dealing crack cocaine. After obtaining a warrant and searching his house, police charged Wurie with felony possession of drugs, firearms and ammunition.

Both Riley and Wurie argued that police violated their rights by searching their phones without a warrant, but what exactly does the Fourth Amendment say?

The Fourth Amendment prevents the government from conducting unreasonable search and seizure of a person’s home and belongings. That means unless the police have a warrant and a “reasonable suspicion” that a person has committed a crime, they can’t just show up and search a house. If they do conduct a search without a warrant, as in the landmark case Mapp v. Ohio, the evidence they find cannot be used in court – that’s known as the exclusionary rule. 

There are some exceptions. Police are allowed to conduct warrantless searches of suspects to eliminate physical threats possibly concealed in their clothes. They may also search wallets, bags and items like cigarette packs for evidence pertinent to the arrest. However, in Riley’s and Wurie’s cases, the information on the phones posed no threat to the officers and could not be known to contain immediately relevant evidence. So what would justify the search?

Proponents of the warrantless search argue that the information held on cellphones is uniquely volatile. The data on a phone may be erased remotely, or even by moving the phone outside a set location, making it possible for suspects to keep police from accessing incriminating evidence saved to the device.

District Attorney Thomas Zugibe of Rockland County, N.Y., signed a friend-of-the-court brief in support of warrantless searches. He told the Wall Street Journal that technology “is making it easier and easier for criminals to do their trade” and the court ruling “is making it harder for law enforcement to do theirs.”

Opponents of warrantless searches contend that confiscated phones can be secured by disconnecting them from mobile networks or by placing them in bags designed to block wireless signals. The ruling also permits police to search phones without a warrant in the case of extreme emergencies.

After the court’s ruling, Steven R. Shapiro of the ACLU wrote, “We have entered a new world but, as the court today recognized, our old values still apply and limit the government’s ability to rummage through the intimate details of our private lives.”

Chief Justice Roberts wrote that a search of a cellphone, even a basic flip phone, could yield much more information about a suspect than a simple search of his pockets. Anything from contacts to GPS records of the phone’s location to an Internet browsing history could be found on a phone. Phones can also connect to information stored on the cloud, making the amount of information accessible by phone essentially unlimited.

Cellphones “are now such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that the proverbial visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy,” Roberts said. “The phrase, ‘There's an app for that’ is now part of the popular lexicon,” he said. “The average smartphone user has installed 33 apps, which together can form a revealing montage of the user's life.”

The justices generally have come down on the side of privacy rights in three previous Fourth Amendment rulings related to technology.

• In Kyllo v. U.S. (2001), the court ruled that it was illegally invasive for police to use a thermal imaging device without a warrant to detect if defendant Danny Kyllo was growing marijuana in his apartment.

• In U.S. v. Jones (2012), the court unanimously ruled that police had violated Antoine Jones’ right to privacy by attaching a GPS device to his car without a warrant on the suspicion that Jones was selling drugs.

• In contrast to the previous cases, in Maryland v. King (2013) a divided court ruled that a suspect’s DNA may be entered into a state-run database to see if he or she has committed crimes in the past
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What do you think?

Do you agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to search a cellphone?  Does the ruling make it too difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals? Or are privacy rights more important?



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Comments
5/2/2018
Magnolia
Kira
Mr. Metzger
I believe that the police should not be able to search your personal cell phone without a warrant. This is your own device which you pay for, so it should not be violated by the government unless with probable cause. The fourth amendment is proof that items belonging to an individual cannot be searched without a warrant. Although it’s understandable for a warrant to be needed. Many criminals have important evidence on their cell phones which can help in cases, trials, and conviction.

5/17/2017
Magnolia, TX
Linda
Mr. Metzger
I do believe that the police need a search warrant before they are allowed to search a cell phone. Of course there has to be a probable cause too. Even under urgent situations, warrant less searches are not acceptable. If not then they would be violating people's personal rights. There was a placement of the 4th Amendment for a reason. The police do not have the right to take away our old values just because there's new technology that can store information.

5/16/2017
Texas
Griffin
Magnolia West
I believe that it is unconstitutional to search a person's cell phone without a warrant whether it is in a "matter of urgency" or not. My reason being that it gives out the idea that if it is urgent the police could start getting away of searching houses or cars without permission or warrant if it is urgent. Another reason being that people's cell phone in today's age is their whole life on their phone which backs up the fact that it is a complete and utter invasion of privacy.

5/10/2016
Hoover, Alabama
Treasure and Summer
Spain Park High School
Although it may make it more difficult for law enforcement to crack down on criminals, we believe it is necessary to protect the privacy of cellphones in order to uphold the rights the fourth amendment gives. We also believe that privacy rights are more important than overriding those rights to obtain an arrest. There is also exceptions to the ruling which would protect law enforcement in emergency situations. That is a very positive things because it gives the opposing side some leeway to search through other people's property in severe or dangerous situations.

3/17/2016
Stroudsburg,PA
Lauren
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I feel that police shouldn't search our phones without a warrant becuase it's our phones that are being use/search. We have our rights to be private about our phones. We arnt saying that police doesn't have to check out phones,they just need a warrant

3/16/2016
Stroudsburg, Pa
Tiffany
Mr.Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
I agree with the Supreme Court that police officers should have a warrant to look through someone cell phone. It is an invasion on privacy to look through anyone's phone without an actual reason. People have things on their phone that only their eyes should see and if police officers look through someone's phone that isn't guilty that would be wrong. Looking through someone's personal property is also a violation to the fourth amendment.

3/16/2016
Stroudsburg,PA
Nasir
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to search a cellphone because the evidence they find cannot be used in court anyway. This is known as the exclusionary rule as well. This ruling does not make it too difficult to arrest criminals because there are better ways to find evidence.

3/16/2016
Stroudsburg, PA
Alexia
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
I feel like the police should not go through the our personal belongings without a warrant. I say that because if it's that big of a deal we, meaning ourselfs should go up to the police and show them. And if it's that big of a deal the officer can say do you have anything on your phone that could help with this crime or if you want to show me anything on it. No matter the situation it is our personal belonging and privacy.and we have our rights to have privacy on our phone.

3/16/2016
Stroudsburg, PA
Waqar M.
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg
I feel like it is a correct way to have warrants before searching someones phone. Basically, one day your walking and then suddenly a cop comes and takes your phone and looks at everything on the phone and tries to find evidence that something is illegal on the phone. It is wrong to do this. Cops should get a warrant because it is very bad to go through someone's privacy. It is also bad to go through someones phone, a private device.

3/16/2016
Stroudsburg,PA
Nick
Mr. Hanna Stroudsburg Junior high school
I do agree with the Supreme Court because it is your property. Privacy rights are more important because it is yours and you have the right to some privacy.

3/16/2016
Stroudsburg,PA
Lauren
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I feel that police shouldn't search our phones without a warrant becuase it's our phones that are being use/search. We have our rights to be private about our phones. We arnt saying that police doesn't have to check out phones,they just need a warrant

3/15/2016
murrieta/California
Daniel
Jabro/ Creekside
I agree the court supreme should have warrants when searching though a cell phone. I think a police officer should not be going through anyone's phone with out warrant no matter how bad the situation is. Even searching a car or house requires a warrant so should a cell phone witch is way more personal. Kids now days have personal Information on it and it shouldn't be hard to get a warrant if you have proof but i strongly believe an officer needs a warrant.

3/15/2016
Stroudsburg, PA
Berend
Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I do not think a search warrant should be required to search someomes phone. For people that say it's a invasion of privacy, no one really cares about what you have on your phone. What's so bad about someone seeing pictures of you and your dog or whatever weird stuff you do. Of course a random police officer shouldn't be able to look at your phone. You could have a special person to check and the information found on your phone unless related to the crime left confidential. So lets say your phone was taken away because someone thinks you have an illegal picture of a table on your phone. But instead they find a illegal picture of a chair. You shouldnt be punished for the picture of the chair because that is not what they were searching for. I think it's worth it to make law enforcement to find criminals. Would you rather have a thousands of bad people out there, or have someone who really dosent care what's on your phone search it.

3/15/2016
Stroudsburg, Pa
Paige
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
Police should have a warrant to look at someone's phone. Many people hold private and personal things in their phones that nobody but them should see. You need a warrant to check someone's house right? Well then, you should need one to check a phone. They are different, but both are personal and private.

3/15/2016
Stroudsburg, PA
AJ Schito
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
Police officers should not be aloud to search your phone without a warrant. The 4th amendment protects us in saying that we have rights to our personal belongings. This also only scares people and eventually in the court they would be ruled not guilty. I believe that a warrant is always needed

3/15/2016
Stroudsburg PA
Hannah
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg
I think that the police should be required to have a search warrant because searching someones phone or belongings is against the fourth amendment and an absolute violation of privacy. The police should bot have such a powerful right to invade someones things.

3/15/2016
Stroudsburg/Pennsylvania
Gabriella L
Mr.Hanna/SJHS
The 4th amendment states that people's belongings are protected, your phone is your personal belonging. The right to have a warrant to search a phone before going through it isn't going to change anything or make it harder for them to do their job. People have a right to their personal belongings. I feel that you need a warrant to search through something.

3/15/2016
Stroudsburg,PA
Laif
Mr.Hana\stroudsburg
There should be a warrant to search someones phone. A phone is a personal belongings and the 4th amendment States that you belongings are protected. The law on the cell phone searches are not going to make the police's job harder. The police have to get a warrant to search your house and that doesn't seem to be a big deal. The police just want themselves have more power than they need.

3/14/2016
Stroudsburg/ PA
Madison
Mr. Hanna
Police should not be able to search your cellphone without a warrant. Everyone has their own private stuff in their phone that they may not want people to see. Cellphone owners pay for their own bills, therefore they should be the only ones able to see the information on it. Police must be given permission to look through a phone.

1/14/2016
murrieta/California
Khedar Chuck Jones
Jabro/Creekside
According to the fourth amendment ,police should have a warrant that ask you the permission and gives you the reason why the search is being conducted.Looking things with permission and without permission makes a big difference.I agree with what supreme court says and I believe that the privacy of one person is important.“Privacy comes at a cost." What if im not in the mood and the cops want to search my phone without a warrant i would really be pissed but what can i do. I still wouldn't let them search my phone, but at the same time i would because i would have nothing to hide also the cops would suspect something that your hiding something.

12/11/2015
Diamond Bar/CA
AndrewP4
Wong/Lorbeer
I believe that police can search your cellphone without a warrant. Police officers are only trying to do their job by keeping the community safe. They are not interested in your selfies or your text messages with your friends, instead police officers are only trying to find out if you are affiliated with a crime they are investigating. Obtaining a warrant may take too much time if they are in hurry to gather information as quickly as possible. If you have done nothing wrong and have nothing to hide, you do should just let your cellphone be searched. Even though it may feel uncomfortable, know that you are giving help to a person who will do their best to help you in return. All in all, police do have the right to search peoples' cellphones.

12/11/2015
Diamond Bar/ CA
ValerieP5
Wong /Lorbeer
The Supreme Court states that police need a warrant to search your phone, even if the person seems suspicious. I agree with them. Nowadays, some people in society see the police as the bad guy. If they search people without a warrant, the society will think that he violated Amendment Four, "The right of the people... against unreasonable searches and seizures and... no Warrants shall issue... supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched... " I do, however, believe that the ruling will make it harder to arrest criminals. There might be a criminal in your everyday life and not know it until a policy tells him he needs to search his phone, but he can't do that because the police doesn't have a warrant. Thanks to privacy rights, there is still a criminal in your life.

12/11/2015
Diamond Bar/CA
AndrewP4
Wong/Lorbeer
I believe that police can search your cellphone without a warrant. Police officers are only trying to do their job by keeping the community safe. They are not interested in your selfies or your text messages with your friends, instead police officers are only trying to find out if you are affiliated with a crime they are investigating. Obtaining a warrant may take too much time if they are in hurry to gather information as quickly as possible. If you have done nothing wrong and have nothing to hide, you do should just let your cellphone be searched. Even though it may feel uncomfortable, know that you are giving help to a person who will do their best to help you in return. All in all, police do have the right to search peoples' cellphones.

12/11/2015
Diamond Bar, California
Victoria P1
Wong/ Lorbeer Middle School
In my opinion I believe searching your phone without a warrant is an intrusion of your privacy. In Amendment 4 it clearly states "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures." It is unconstitutional to search someone without a warrant. If a person looks suspicious then the police should get a warrant. What about if the person is innocent and police officer still searches them that would be consider an intrusion of somene's privacy.

12/10/2015
Diamond Bar/CA
Aubree
Wong/Lorbeer
I agree with the Supreme Court 100 percent because amendment four protects searches to belongings, and as far as I know a phone is someone’s personal belonging. The police should not go barging in on someone’s phone. I think the ruling does make it difficult for the judge because two crimes are being committed at once. I feel that privacy rights are really important but the court can only rule on the case that was brought to them. In the case Maryland v. King I agree with the Supreme Court’s ruling. I agree with this because that data was already entered into the police's data base so it is based off of older evidence and not current. I also agree with the court in the case U.S. v. Jones. The fact that police are willing to just take away peoples right without thinking about it is amazing because I feel that they think they can just make up some excuse and be able to keep their job. I think that this is really unfair to the citizens of the U.S.

12/10/2015
Diamond Bar, CA
EthanP1
Wong/Lorbeer
I agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to confiscate and search people's cellphones because people have a right to privacy and the police shouldn't be allowed to take away that right from people. The Fourth Amendment clearly states, that the constitution guarantees the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizure. No one is above the law, including the president, so the police cannot interfere with that rule. If police didn't require a warrant to search people's cellphones, it would be a violation of the Fourth Amendment. It may be quite difficult for the police or FBI to find and arrest criminals, but for the sake of the population it would be better that the police would need a warrant in order to confiscate or search any of your belongings. In my opinion, privacy rights are one of the most important things in order to create a balanced government.

12/9/2015
Diamond Bar, CA
VivianP5
Wong/Lorbeer
I do not agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to search a cellphone. When police search your phone, it is because they are suspicious or you are linked to an investigation somehow. The ruling, indeed, makes it difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals. Your phone may hold your private lives, but the law enforcement has a job to do. They are searching for specific details, not details about your personal life. Also, if you have nothing to hide, there should not be a problem. Privacy rights are important, but the law enforcement are doing the search for a good cause. Your cellphone could be the answer to a case. In the Speak Out story provided, it states, "Chief Justice Roberts wrote that a search of a cellphone, even a basic flip phone, could yield much more information about a suspect than a simple search of his pockets." Your cellphone may hold relevant evidence, so in the case of your safety, the search and seizure of your phone does not require a warrant.

12/8/2015
Diamond Bar, California
MeganP1
Wong/Lorbeer
I believe that police should be allowed to search and try to find information from your cell phone with a warrant. I feel this way because, if you were accused of a crime but, deny it, there could always be some kind of information of your crime linked through your phone. Cellphones most likely always have information so, it shouldn't be a bad thing to check your phone. If you're worried about something that the police might find, there's most likely something your hiding. In conclusion, police should be able to search through your phone without a warrant because cellphones could end the crime and keep one less crazy person off the streets.

12/4/2015
Watertown/Massachusetts
Peter
Mr.Remis/Watertown
I don't think that police should be allowed to check your phone without a warrant, because they are invading your private property without your permission and approval. And if it was necessary to even get a warrant for it, you wouldn't need to worry about "evidence" being deleted because it is saved on the hard drive and the phone company can trace it back if needed.

12/4/2015
Watertown High School
Christa
Watertown High School
No I do not think that police should be able to search someone's cellphone without a warrant. I think it is unconstitutional to search without a warrant. Although crimes can be serious and searching a cell phone is necessary, then I do not think it should be that hard to obtain a search warrant if the cell phone could possibly have evidence that would support the crime.

11/19/2015
Diamond Bar, CA
MarinaP5
Wong/Lorbeer
I believe police should be allowed to search your cellphone without a warrant. Even though the police may be invading your privacy, they are doing this for the safety of everyone. If you are not guilty of doing anything, then you have nothing to worry about. If you know that you did not commit any crime, then the police will just check your phone and leave you alone. There is always a possibility that there is evidence that link you to a crime on your phone, so it would be best if the police could check your phone. If you really think about it, would it make a difference to you, if the police had a warrant? If the police has a warrant, then they could check your phone without your permission, so either way you would get no say in whether police can search your phone or not. Therefore, police should be able to search your phone without a warrant, since it is for our protection.

11/13/2015
murrieata ca
cynthia pinegsr
creekside jabro
no they cant. there is an either amendment or law that they cannot search or seize anything without a search warrant.

10/29/2015
Murrieta, CA
Antoinette
Mr.Jabro Creekside High
I agree the court supreme should have warrants when searching though a cell phone. I think a police officer should not be going through anyone's phone with out warrant no matter how bad the situation is. Even searching a car or house requires a warrant so should a cell phone witch is way more personal. Kids now days have personal Information on it and it shouldn't be hard to get a warrant if you have proof but i strongly believe an officer needs a warrant.

10/23/2015
murrieta, california
cameron
mr. jabro creekside high school
I think they shouldn't be able to search your phone without a warrant because it is right they dont have the right ot go into your phone and go through all of your stuff because alot of people hvae private pictures and video of themselves or others and they might have their credit card number and a bunch of notes of things only your eyes should see and not for others to be allowed to see legally and a police officer can have the right to go through it if they have the warrant but even them i still think im my head that it is wrong because in today society people use their phones for everything and that is a device they will find out everything about you in some cases because people do notes of their lives or they make notes of what to do during the day and a person has the right to keep their phone and not have some police officer to search it and get into your business.

9/25/2015
Murrieta, CA
Maria
Jabro/ Creekside Highschool
I do agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to search a cellphone because if not that is an invasion of privacy which is also protected in the Fourth Amendment. However i do believe that in the case that they have much more evidence on a person to convict them of a crime and something on the cellphone would get them their criminal then it might just be ok. But in any other case to search a cellphone without any warrant is an invasion of privacy and should be allowed to happen without a warrant.

9/24/2015
murrieta ca
jennifer
Mr.Jabro Creekside highschool
Clearly it states the fourth amendment. Which says 'Prevention of the government from conducting unreasonable search and seizure of a persons home and belongings". Obviously they had reasonable suspicion after opening his trunk full of weapons. But looking thru someones phone without consent of a warrant is invading of privacy. In that situation it was reasonable but if it was a smaller situation i would have been unethical, like you're looking thru someones belongings without any reason. Now that we got that stated i think it isn't right for a policeman to do that search without a warrant.

9/16/2015
murrieta/ca
Robert
Creekside highschool/ Mr. Jabro
I believe police shouldn't have the right too peoples search and seize anything of the people unless it posses immediate danger. Police believe that they make the law, or have the right too twist up the law and do pretty much the best thing in their favor, witch isn't the case. They are sworn in to protect the law, and uphold it, not create buffer zones based on personal feelings/ emotions. They have no idea what they are getting into, and I could understand how a phone could be a vital piece of evidence, but the amendments and constitution we created so it's harder too take away peoples rights not easier. The point of it was too make law enforcement too do things right and just, not too the point they can start too take away our freedoms for their paycheck.

9/2/2015
Sidney, MT
Hunter Severson
Mr. Faulhaber
I do not believe police have any right to search your cellphone without a warrant. A cell phone can contain many personal items, just like a house or your vehicle, but you need a warrant to search a house or a vehicle. There is no difference between the three, but the police are trying to say it is. If there is no warrant issued and your cell phone is searched, the evidence they find cannot be used in court due to the exclusionary rule.

9/2/2015
Sidney Mt
Bridger Coffman
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
I think police should have to get warrants to search someones phone. There is nothing on a phone that can be a physical threat to a police officer. Therefore police should not be able to search someones phone with out a warrant. Phones are no different then someones house or car which police do have to get a warrant to search so why should they not have to get a warrant to search a phone? If a police officer searches someones phone without a warrant they should not be able to use that evidence in the court case.

9/2/2015
Sidney, MT
Cayden Hecker
Mr.Faulhaber / Sidney High School
Police should not be able to search your cellphone without a warrant. Searching a cellphone is like searching a vehicle or house. It contains all of a persons personal belongings. To search a House or a vehicle require a warrant, why should a cellphone be any different. It can be a very reliable piece of evidence in the court room but just like any of the evidence it must be acquired legally. To find specific information in a cellphone you must SEARCH for information therefore police should be required to get a SEARCH warrant to SEARCH for information in a cellphone.

9/2/2015
Sidney, Montana
Alexis Haggerty
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I believe that police should have the right to search a suspects phone without a warrant. If there is a person that is questionable of committing a crime and has evidence on their phone the police should be able to search the phone for evidence. I know it is somewhat easy to get a warrant but by the time you get the warrant, if the criminal knows your looking at putting him in jail for a crime, the criminal could be long gone and you may never find him again. You would then have a criminal on the loose who may cause more harm.

6/5/2015
Stroudsburg
Jonathan
Mr.Hanna / Stroudsburg JHS
I don't think that the police should be able to go through your phone without a warrant. I think that is a hug invasion of privacy and that it wrong to go through people's phones with out permission or a warrant. Also they don't need to know everything that you say or do on the phone. I think that is weird that they need to know evry little thing that you say or do on your phone.

6/5/2015
Stroudsburg PA
Amy
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
I disagree with the Supreme Court on how police should have to have a warent to search someone's phone. If there is a criminal that has something on his/her phone that police need to investigate then I think it's more important to get that information than to follow privacy rights. Polices job is the protect people and if that means that police have to check phones for reassurance of the situation or to find evidence then I believe that they should be able to do that without a warrant. Many people keep almost all of there personal information on their phone and I think it makes polices jobs harder if they can not check people's phones. This is my opinion on this topic.

6/5/2015
Stroudsburg, PA
Kinley
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
No, I do not think the police should search your phone without a warrant. Privacy rights are very important and it would cross the line if the police did a random search on your phone for no reason. The police should find and arrest criminals based on investigation and clues, not by searching someone's phone. It is not necessary to invade on someone's personal life if they do not have anything to do with the crime.

6/5/2015
Stroudsburg
Jonathan
Mr.Hanna / Stroudsburg JHS
I don't think that the police should be able to go through your phone without a warrant. I think that is a hug invasion of privacy and that it wrong to go through people's phones with out permission or a warrant. Also they don't need to know everything that you say or do on the phone. I think that is weird that they need to know evry little thing that you say or do on your phone.

6/4/2015
Stroudsburg, PA
Sherwin
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
Police should not search your cellphone without a warrant because it is not their property. Just like they need a warrant to search a house of someones belongings, they should need a warrant to search someones cellphone. Also, the police do not know if their is something private or irrelevant for them to see. Some may say that they do need a warrant but when they really put themselves in a situation like that, they may think otherwise. It isn't right for a cop to just search your house, so it shouldn't be right for them to just search your phone.

6/4/2015
Stroudsburg PA
Justin
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
According to the fourth amendment no one has the right to evade your house and person belongings. I don't think the police should be able to check anyone's phone unless they have enough evidence that the phone can be of any use. There's also a fine line between searching for something to prove someone guilty of a crime and invading someone's privacy. If a picture on someone's phone is the difference between a murderer getting his justice or getting away then they should check his phone but if it's nothing important or neccicary then it should be left alone.

6/4/2015
pa stroudsburg junior high school
CJ
Mr. Hanna
i think yes because if there is a major criminal on the loose they will need the most help that they can get. Some people say no to this because they think it's invading privacy

6/3/2015
Stroudsburg PA
Amber
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg Jhs
I don't think that police should be able to search your cellphone without a warrant. I think it is unconstitutional and an invasion of your privacy. That device contains your personal life and I don't think that it is right for police to search it without good reasons to and a warrant

5/8/2015
Hoover AL
Cody
Mr. Parker / Spain Park High School
I do not believe that police have the right to search a phone without a warrant. Although it may connect you too crime, they don't have enough evidence to get a warrant, so the person shouldn't have to submit their phone to the police. When they search a phone, they have all the person's personal information that they may not have wanted people to know. The person may also have confidential information that could be leaked by an officer. Many things could happen, so I believe it is unconstitutional to search a phone without a warrant.

4/23/2015
murieta/california
Derek C
Jabro/Creekside
Police should be able to do their job, protect people from harm and things that are potentially harmful. I they cannot do that hen why are we paying them? Of course there should be limits on just how much they can impede on our privacy but for the most part they should be able to search whatever they need as long as they provide a legitimate reason for doing so.

2/27/2015
murrieta CA
nicole ferrer
Jabro creekside
i think police should only be able to search are phones if they have a good legit reason. if it comes to harming someone or putting someone in harms way.only then in other cases i think they need a warrent

2/26/2015
Murrieta CA
Angel Arreola
Jabro Creekside
I believe that the Police are NOT allowed to search anything of yours without a warrant, if he does that is a very big privacy issue. That should be penalized against if they choose to search without permission, its completely illegal and unconstitutional. Like what if your a cop and your suspected of doing something wrong, do you want them going through your stuff or are you gonna make then get a warrant? it obvious

12/19/2014
murrieta, ca
taylor w
mr.rodgers/tenaja
i believe in order to search a cellphone for evidence of something you must have a warrant to do so. that rule should not make it hard for officials to arrest criminals... how would you like it if someone took your phone and went through all your history and pictures and messages? probably wouldn't like that too much. i believe privacy rights should stay important because thats one of the biggest mistakes people of the law make.

12/19/2014
Murrieta/ca
Leilani Z
Jabro/CHS
I believe that cell phones should be treated equally as other evidence holding places such as a home, and that a warrant should be given in order to search it. A warrant should be required before searching someones cellphone, however, this allows the person to potentially delete evidence. I believe this ruling does somewhat make it difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals, because it gives them a way of being able to delete evidence that leads to a crime. Privacy rights are important, but so are people's lives, and other aspects of their lives. The supreme court expresses a warrant is indeed necessary, but i believe it would take too long for it to be issued, and the potential evidence can be deleted.

11/20/2014
Murrieta/California
Austin E.
Jabro/Creekside
In my personal opinion, I don't think that a police officer should just be able to go through your phone without a warrant and without permission. I personally don't put anything on my phone or on social media that I wouldn't want anyone seeing! However, who to say that I simply just don't want an officer to go through my phone? I do have a right to my privacy. I would completely get it though if it was for some kind of investigation or something, but I most likely wouldn't just handover my phone without reason.

11/14/2014
Belleville, NY
Krystle
Miss Colby/BHCS
I 100% think that police can search your cell phone without a warrant. For example, what were cell phones invented for? Communication through talking! That's what the intended invention was for. It was never intended to be invented for texting or bullying or anything like that. So, police should have complete control over your cell phone records if you are suspected of a crime or bullying or even if you are suspected of texting and driving.

11/14/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Amyah
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think police should be able to look in your phone without a warrant. All they want to do is find evidence so they can prove something. Why should they need a warrant so they can look in your phone. They want to find evidence that you might have so they can find out what happen in that situation of crime and they want to catch the person or people that did the crime.

11/14/2014
Ny
Colton
Colby/ BHCS
Whether or not police should be allowed to search your phone should be based entirely on whether it is a cell phone violation, such as texting and driving, or not. By NY state law if a police officer suspects of you texting and driving they can legally search your phone for proof without a warrant. However say you were pulled over for something minor like a broken headlight, i personally do not believe that a police officer should be allowed to search your phone then without a warrant. But, if you are endangering the life of yourself or the other people around you by texting and driving you deserve your phone to be searched and all tickets issued. Clearly there is a fine line between legal and illegal search and seizure, according to the bill of rights, you are granted that they cannot search without a warrant UNLESS they have probable cause. So if you do not believe the officer has a probable cause to search your phone do not hand it over.

11/14/2014
Belleville/NY
Skylar
Miss. Colby/BHCS
I believe without a warrant police should not be able to go through your phone. Warrants should be required to search anything like a house, car, or even a cell phone. You have a right to privacy and unless the police have a warrant signed by a judge or supreme court official the police officer can't go through your phone. This ruling does not make it difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals. With a written warrant you can arrest a criminal and search his/her phone. Privacy rights should always be important. You wouldn't want someone going through your belongings for the heck of it. You should have a form of proof saying you can.

11/14/2014
Belleville/NY
Marisa
Colby/Belleville Henderson
In my opinion, if you are suspected in holding a certain piece of evidence and the police notify you that they need to see your phone, you should have to give it to them. Yes, you may have personal things on your phone, but would you rather have them see some old pictures or be thrown in jail because you were a suspect for a crime that you were never proven innocent for? There are certain things they do need a warrant for, such as going into your home. That on the other hand is a lot different than just looking through your cell phone. There could be someone who had messages or pictures in there phone that were pieces of evidence to prove them guilty, and if the police need that evidence then they should be able to go through the phone to get it. They shouldn't need to get a warrant to go through it. Some men might say that their wallet is something else besides their phone that they don't like people going through. However, you don't need a warrant to go through someones wallet.

11/14/2014
Stroudsburg/ Pennsylvania
Karissa
Mr. Hannah/ Stroudsburg Junior High School
I believe that warrants should not be required to search a phone, because the cellphone is a very useful resource to find suspecting criminals. The cellphone provides information faster than searching a database. By the time the police are able to receive a warrant and search the suspects phone he/she could have ran off or the committed the crime. The ruling for this debate is bothersome because first the police have to file for a warrant. Then they have to search for the suspects house, if not already. Finally they have to present the information to the suspect and verify it to them. If this were a terrorist occasion it could become dangerous. The police would need to bring in the suspects right away and try to notify the ruling for any catch on a criminal. By the time they are able to look into the criminal, the damage could have already been done. This is not the 18th century anymore. There is more technology that could be used for damage and murder. We need to be able to get on the case right away.

11/14/2014
NY
Tom
Colby
if there is a threat to another persons life, i believe 100% that the police should be able to look through your phone. How would you feel if a student in your class sent a text and said something about shooting up your school. Wouldn't you want the police to search there phone to have proof if this person really said that. Here is the thing if they did not say it and the police are wrong i do not see it right for the police officer to run around and tell other people. He should be the only one that knows whats on your phone and there should be no problem with that. Not like he is going to tell the world what you have said and what else is on your on phone.

11/14/2014
belleville ny
lauren salisbury
belleville henderson colby
police should be able to look at your phone. I mean not for the heck of it, but if your known or they think your a crimininal of some sort then yes by all means. Your phone has all your personal belongings yes but all they will look for is calls messages and maybe pictures.. if you know your not guilty then no worrries if you know your guily hand it over and admit or run like heck your choice. police should be able to look through your phone..

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg , PA
Emma
Mr. Hana / stroudsburg jhs
I do not think that police officers should be able to go through your phone without a warrent. It's a violation of privacy, and freedom. I do not think its fair. If you are a victim of something, police officers should get a warren. But they shouldn't be able to just go through your phone.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Jessica M
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
Yes, I agree with the Supreme Court a warrant must be issued to search someone's cellphone. A warrant is needed to commit any type of search and a phone search is no exception. Although this might complicate law enforcements job to catch criminals, our natural rights are more important. Our country was built on our freedom and to protect our freedom the Bill of Rights was created. In accordance with the fourth amendment a warrant must be issued to search someone's belongings, house or papers. The requirement of a warrant to search one's cellphone would just be in accordance with the Bill of Rights and existing laws.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Jessica M
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
Yes, I agree with the Supreme Court a warrant must be issued to search someone's cellphone. A warrant is needed to commit any type of search and a phone search is no exception. Although this might complicate law enforcements job to catch criminals, our natural rights are more important. Our country was built on our freedom and to protect our freedom the Bill of Rights was created. In accordance with the fourth amendment a warrant must be issued to search someone's belongings, house or papers. The requirement of a warrant to search one's cellphone would just be in accordance with the Bill of Rights and existing laws.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg/Pennsylvania
Victoria
Mr.Hanna/ Stroudsburg Junior high School
I think that it is none of the polices business to go on private people's property. Expectantly if the police do not have a warrant or a subpoena. if someone puts something on social media that was suspicious of foul play they need to gather the evidence and tell the police and then they can handle it. People that have serious criminal records should have some rules. But if someone says something specific in their texting like i am going to do something at this specific place then the person should either tell the police of found at an accessory to this crime that was committed. The police have the citizens trust with their lives but they are going to start losing their trust if they keep watching them. They need to put a sliver of trust in the citizens they would do the right thing.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Hannah
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think that the police have no right to look through your cellphone without a warrant because it is personal information and they would have no reason to be looking through it. Also, it is an invasion of privacy and would feel uncomfortable knowing that someone looked at your personal information such as photos, videos, contacts, social media or even credit card information.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg/Pennsylvania
Javier
Mr.Hanna/ Stroudsburg Jounior High School
It is bad because people have privacy things they text other people privacy things they don't want knowing. It is just weird to nobody wants to be "stalked" from their messages. Also people don't want to be checked by the police through text messages. Also when people joke around about something that might be a an inside joke the cops might take it seriously. Finally, sometimes people text someone something they don't want anyone else to know then the cops find out.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg/PA
Mickenna
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think it's manatory to have a warrant because what if the person didn't have anything to do and wasn't the bad guy? The supreme court has the correct idea by wanting to make cops have warrants because it also makes them think that if the person is really guilty or not. Plus, I think that without a warrant the should get a fine for looking into personal stuff the victim beholds on his or her device. The victims may hold evidence but still there should be a warrant even though you know there's evidence because they could sue you if they think that you vialated their property and could probably press charges.

11/13/2014
Stroudburg pa
David
Mr Hanna stroudburg junior high school
The cops can check your phone if you did something illegal. If did drug dealing and the cops see you doing it they have the Right to check your phone with no warrant

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Emilio
Me. Hannah/Stroudsburg JHS
I think police should be able to search cell phones. It's should be because let's say the police see a text that says " Take out (some guys name), and make a nice clean job of it", than they have some pure evedence. Evedence is perfect in a crime to back up your theories on that person being the perpetrator. Also pictures are also a key because sometimes people can be stupid and take a picture of them or make a video of them commuting a crime. Above all, they should check people's phones who are suspicious and are committing a crime.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Danya
Mr. Hanna
I think that police should be able to search your phone without a warrant. They should only be allowed to do this when someone is suspected for a crime. It really doesn't matter because even if the police have a warrant and you delete the pictures, text, ect. They can still see those pictures, texts,ect. no matter If that person deleted them or not.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg Pennsylvania
Sherri
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think police should not look in people's things like purses, cellphones, wallets and other things without a warrant. Also if police see something unusual in someone's bag or purse and go into the bag without permission they might get into a lot of trouble with the warrant. Even though police are doing their job they still should not look in things that is not theirs. People say that police can look into things without a warrant they still should not do it. It will get them in trouble by their boss at the police station.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg/PA
Bartek
Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think that police should not be able to go through someone's phone without a warrant because people have personal information like credit card number, or anything that they don't want the police to know about. The police should only be able to go through someone's phone only if they have a proof that they are quilty to get some evidence. I think that police needs a warrant to go through someone's phone.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Allendy
Mr.hanna/stroudsburg
I think police dont have the rights to search your phone without a warrent. It would be invading your personal items and thabt isnt right. I also beleive no one should be accused of a crime. If they i have a good excuse then they will be able to have the rights and so on. But without and excuse that is valid or a warrent i dont think its right

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Da-Nelle
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
Yes, I agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to search a cellphone. Everyone's entitled to their own privacy and their rights shouldn't be violated. Before they take someone's phone a warrant should be issued with enough evidence or proof. If a cop just took someone's phone for no reason and searched it, they've invaded that persons privacy. Now the cop has seen everything that was private that they should not have see.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Adjoa
Me.Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
I don't think that police need a warrant to be able to search people's phones. As mentioned in the paragraph, pictures, texts, and other evidence on a mobile device can lead to suspects of crimes. Police should have the right to search people's phones if they think the person is linked to a crime. Otherwise, there would be no point to investigate because the sources would be limited. Also, there might be enough valid information without evidence from a phone. If there is no reason for someone's phone to be searched, the policeman will most likely know that and not invade the suspect's privacy.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Nigel
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
No, I do not agree with the Supreme Court that law enforcement must obtain a warrant in order to search a cellphone. The ruling makes it to hard for law enforcement to make arrests. Cellphones have a lot of valuable information on them that could be the difference in convicting a drug dealer or letting him walk free. I know privacy rights are important but not as important as letting law enforcement do their jobs.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Maddy
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
I believe that the police should be allowed to search a person's phone without a warrant. Whenever my parents take away my phone, there is no doubt in my mind that they will not be looking through it. I'm always hesitant to give it to them. My parents always say "do you have anything to hide?" And I reply "no" then they say "then let me see your phone". If the police need to look through your phone, you shouldn't be hesitant to give it to them unless you did something wrong. If you don't have anything to hide, then why does it matter if they look through your phone?

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Katie
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
In addition to that, the 4th amendment protects our rights to privacy without a warrant. The Bill of Rights is something that has been around since the late 1700's, and it is something that our country believes in and abides by. Why change it for a singe reason? This is why I believe that In addition to that, the 4th amendment protects our rights to privacy without a warrant. The Bill of Rights is something that has been around since the late 1700's, and it is something that our country believes in and abides by. Why disrupt history's makings it for a singe reason that we've gone this long without changing as it is? This is why I believe that the police should not be able to search your ceellpohone without a warrant.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Joel
Mr Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
Warrants should be required for police officers to search a cell phone. This is because phones contain lots of private information that many people may not be willing to share simply because they find it to personal or embarassing which is probably one of the reasons that the Fourth Amendment prohibits unwarranted searches in the first place. Also If unwarranted cell phone searches were allowed then police or criminals pretending to be police could easily get personal information such as credit card and bank information and use them for criminal or malicious purposes. People have rights that need to be protected from even law enforcement. Privacy is one of these. If a judge doesn't think there's enough conclusive evidence to search someone's phone, then a policeman doesn't have a right to.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Kalin
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think that police should be allowed to search your phone without a warrant because someone might be a suspect in a crime, and they might need proof to call them guilty. Even if they saw some personal things on the person's phone, they are police and they should be trusted. For criminals, cellphones are an easy way to pass information back and forth. Things such as pictures and text messages could help a lot of authorities. I know it is right to respect people's privacy, but the authorities will need evidence to solve a crime.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
Jordan
Mr.Hanna Stroudsburg JHS
Yes I belive police should be able to search your phone without a warrant. The reason is if you have nothing to hide then why does it matter if they search your phone or not? Also if you are doing something illegal and they do not know about it somebody could possibly be killed or injured because of something you did that was illegal and it could have more serious consequences then the consequences that you could have possibly received before you committed the crime

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Kenneth
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think the police should not have to have a warrent. If they have to have one it could be to late, they could have deleted everything on it so their would be no evidence.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg P.A.
Mary
Mr. Hanna Stroudsburg Junior High School
In my opinion, police have absolutely no right what so ever to go through stuff that's not their property. I understand that it helps for investigations, but that doesn't change the fact that it's not their phone and have no right to look through their personal life. Police definitely need a permit for something like this. At least if you have a warrant their will be no problems and the criminal can't say much to judges.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Logan
Mr. Hanna/stroudsburg JHS
I think that police shouldn't be alowed to search your phone without a warrent. They should have to get a warrent because you may have private stuff on your phone that is none of there business. And one other thing is that it's your property and you paid for it it should be your choice weather or not they can see your phone.

11/13/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Taylor
Hanna/ Stroudsburg SJHS
In my opinion, police have the right to search your cellphone without a warrant. Though it may be uncomfortable to let a stanger see pictures, calls, and text conversations people shouldn't have reason to worry- unless they are a criminal or have something to hide. the average person won't get their phone searched anyway because police would most likely have reasoning to search a device. Under the circumstance that they are wrong you shouldn't worry, unless you are guilty! In the case that a person is worried that police may exploit them; they shouldn't be because it's not like the cops are going to tell all their friends the juicy details of some text messages to their friends. The evidence can't even be used in court to persecute someone. On the other hand, cellphones could be extremely helpful to find evidence and help authorities solve many cases. Though it may not be used in court, other evidence that police find from the cellphone can be. Let's face it- when is there a day you go without your phone!

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Brianne
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I believe that police should be required to get a search warrant in order to obtain information from your phone. The Supreme Court has ruled in favor of getting a warrant, which I agree with. Not having a search warrant does violate our right under the Fourth Amendment. Police can still have access to the information on a cellphone, but they need to get it properly through a search warrant. I feel our privacy rights are important and need to be protected. Recently, in the Eric Frein case, police made sure they had a warrant before going through his computer and phone.

11/12/2014
Stroudsbug/Pa
Alefiyah
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I believe that police have no right to search through people's cellphones without a warrant. My belief is that the police have every right to be suspicious, but I believe that the police can wait before they start an investigation. No, the ruling may not make it difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals. It may make it a little more harder, but not difficult. It's okay for the police to have suspicions, but they probably have a better shot at finding a criminal with a judge's approval. You also have to take into consideration of the accused innocent. Say if there was a fifty percent chance knowing whether the person is innocent or not with just the police's knowledge. Probably, there would be a greater percentage knowing whether the person is innocent or not with the judge's approval. We don't want to waste majority of innocent people's time. When it comes to severe or important cases, I don't think that privacy is more important. However, we can still have a fair protection of privacy, while catching the guilty and releasing the inno- cent.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Sarah
Mr. Hanna/ SJHS
I agree with the Supreme Court that police should have a warrant in order to search someone's phone. The person they are searching might have private things on their phone and that would be invading their privacy. I think that just showing up with out a warrant is not right. Just ask the judge for a warrant to see their phone. I also believe that ruling doesn't make it more difficult for law inforcement. It makes it easier for criminals to trade. The privacy right is important but if something is illegal, then the police have the right to arrest them for it.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Kiara
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think the police need to have a warrant to search someone's phone. I don't think people should be falsely accused if the police don't have evidence. I don't think people shouldn't have their privacy invaded for no reason. Our phones are our own personal devices and the police have no right to go though our belongings.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Dillon
Mr. Hanna SJHS
I agree with the Supreme Court that a warrant should be required for a police officer to search a cell phone. Despite the story including David Leon Riley and the evidence the police gained from searching his phone, a phone is still private property belonging to the person who owns it. I don't think that it makes arresting criminals too difficult because if a crime is committed then there will most likely be another lead for the police to follow. I think privacy is too important because what if a person who the police think is acting suspicious but is actually innocent gets his or her private messages and conversations raided through with no evidence found? No one should have to just hand over their privacy because of suspicion from an officer.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg/Pa
Quinn
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I do not think the police should be able to search your phone without a warrant. The Supreme Court is correct in that it is personal property just as actual property such as a house would be. The ruling in no way makes it to difficult to arrest criminals. If they needed to know what was going on that badly with his or her personal live they could get a warrant or check his or her social media. The problem is not so much privacy as it is just a direct violation of the fourth amendment.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Gabby
Mr. Hanna/ sjhs
I think the police shouldn't have a warrant. I think there are certain things that the police can search without a warrant. If they know they did something and need to stop them right at that moment it would be okay to search them. The police is not going to judge you on what you look up. They only want to save peoples life's if in danger

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
McKenna
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
The police should not be able to search your phone without a warrant. If they really needed to search your phone they could get a warrant. What if the they dont find anything and they see private info. Unless they absolutely know that it was on your phone they should have to get a warrant just like if it were your house. Some people could make other people look guilty but in turn they are not guilty. So if you search someone's phone without their permission that is invading their personal space. Even if that person has a criminal recorded it is still not right to look unless you have a warrant.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Khaled
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think that the police have no right to search somebody’s phone without permission except if they find guns or the person is driving without license because, this person might of did something wrong and they need to know what he and is it dangerous to other people or not because if they just leave him he might kill you or do something bad to you. Also, you might be saying that police have no right to search somebody’s, well on his phone are things that show that did something wrong or that he is someone that is going to kill someone and that person he’s going to kill might be you. So I think that police have the right to search somebody’s phone only if they see that he is dangerous.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Alanah
Mr. Hanna/ stroudsburg junior high school
I agree that the police should have warrent before searching a person's phone. I don't think it makes it too difficult to arrest people. I don't think that privacy right are more important then stopping criminals.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg Pennsylvania
Zoey
Mr.hanna stroudsburg junior high
I do not think that people's cell phones should be checked but if it helps the police then it should be allowed. If it has to do with the law or issues then checking there phone should be allowed. For example, in the story the mans phone got checked and they found out about his murder and his addiction of crack cocaine that can be allowed but in other unimportant stuff it should not be allowed.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Amyah
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think police shouldn't be able to go through your phone without a warrant because it's your phone, your private property. The police doesn't have any right to just look through your phone when ever they want to. If the police do look through your phone without a warrant I would say that is a violation of private property. Also I think they shouldn't be able to look through your phone without a warrant because then police will look through your phone when ever they want to.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Owen
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
No, I do not agree with the Supreme Court. This is because the police are only trying to stop bad things from happening and catch criminals. The Supreme Court seems to just be making it even harder for the police to track down criminals and catch them doing something illegal. The ruling making the police get a warrant in order to track down a criminal is just slowing down the process and giving the criminal more time to figure out how to get away with the crime and get rid of the evidence. Privacy rights should not over rule the right for police to search a cell phone.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Maximus
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JRHS
I don't think that any officer or authority should be able to search any of you person belongings without permission or a warrant. I feel this way because phones are just like wallets or purses now a days. They hold personal belongings such as passwords pictures and now even credit card information. There might also be other things people hold dear

11/12/2014
stroudsburg Pennsylvania
Nick
Mr.Hanna/stroudsburg JHS
Many people would think that a warrant is needed, while many oppose. Me? I say they need it. Its your personal property! I think that they would not like it if you did it to them, so unless they have a warrant, i say screw them. You worked hard for that phone, you probably have personal files on it, personal messages, pictures etc. On the contrary, if they are asking you to let them search it, they must have a good reason. A cell phone is a factor in personal property just as a house, car or clothes. So i say, wheres your warrant?

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg/Pennsylvania
Annika
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg Junior High School
I think the police shouldn't be able to search your phone without a warrant. If the police suspect you committed a crime, then they should get a warrant and search your phone. However, if it is an emergency, they should be able to search your phone.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Amy
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg school district
I think that police should be able to search people's phones only if there is possible evidence that that person commited a crime. I think that police will definitely find more evidence on a case by looking at the persons phone. I do believe in social privacy but if invading someone's personal things on their phone will help solve a crime I think it's a great idea. For example if someone was commitng a murder with a friend they would have most likely texted eachother to meet somewhere. Police won't have that evidence unless they can search people's phones.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Amber
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
I don't agree with the supreme court that a warrant is required for police to search someone's cellphone. There are a lot of people out there that can plan crimes. They can use their phones to call other people explaining the crime, or their search history could have something to do with they crime they have committed. I think police have every right to search people's phones. The police are here to help us and keep us safe, so if there is someone that is thought to be a potential threat, the evidence to prove them a threat could be on their cellphone. I think police have the right to search people's phones, for safety purposes.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg/PA
Ava
Hannah/Stroudsburg JHS
In my opinion, people's phones are very private items. I believe it is intrusive and unnessecary to search a person's phone based off of a small suspicion that the person may be hiding something. The only scenario where I believe it is acceptable to search a person's personal cell phone is if the person committed a serious crime and the cell phone served as a source of answers, and if a person was missing and their phone could possibly be used to track where they are.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg PA
Lia
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I believe that the police should be able to search anyone's phone without a warrant because it could endanger other people. If police have to take time to get a warrant your taking time in which a case could've already been solved. Lastly if police think that the person could have possible evidence involving the case they have every ought to search any personal belongings especially their cellphone.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Jeremy
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think the police have no right to go through people's phones without a warrant, because it's private property just like their homes. What if the police are wrong and went through a person's cellphone without a warrant it wouldn't look right, but if they had a warrant to go through the person's phone that would be ok even if there still going through your phone, but they have a right to do so.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Daniel
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
Yes, because I don't think it's right for a cop to check someone private property with out a reason.No, because what if checking the phone didn't show any evidence or lead to anything suspicious. I think a cop shouldn't check a phone unless the person lets them.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Shavaughn
Mr. Hana/Stroudsburg SJHS
I think that the police should have the right to go through any ones electronics.In the article district attorney Thomas Zugibe of Rockland county said to the wall street journal that electronics are making it easy for criminals and harder for police. The over all goal of the police officers job it to help find the criminal . I believe that they should have the right to go through some ones phone so they could catch the criminals . At the end the police are not the bad guys, the person who brock the law is.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg pensylvania
Emily
Mr.Hanna stroudsburg jr.high
Police do not have the right to search your phone without a warrent. You could have personal photos or texts that the police don't have any business seeing, or they may not have a good enough reason to look at your personal information. The type of warrent should matter because maybe it isn't a good enough reason to check your phone. I do not agree with the judge's reasoning, it does not make sense to let the police search without a warrent. The man could have not given the phone to the police because they didn't have a warrent, because they didn't have a warrent they didn't have the right. The police do not have the right to search your phone without a warrent.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Nikki
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
Police should not be able to search your cellphones without a warrant. This is because number one it is an invasion of privacy to the person and they may no want anyone to see what they have on their phone. Number two is that in the fourth amendment it says that no one can search you or your property without a warrant and if they do find something suspicious they would not be able to use it against the person because they did not have a warrant. I agree with the Supreme Court and no the ruling doesn't make it too hard to arrest criminals because you are innocent until proven guilty in the court of law. Privacy rights are more important .

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Nikki
Mr. Hanna/ Stroudsburg JHS
Police should not be able to search your cellphones without a warrant. This is because number one it is an invasion of privacy to the person and they may no want anyone to see what they have on their phone. Number two is that in the fourth amendment it says that no one can search you or your property without a warrant and if they do find something suspicious they would not be able to use it against the person because they did not have a warrant. I agree with the Supreme Court and no the ruling doesn't make it too hard to arrest criminals because you are innocent until proven guilty in the court of law. Privacy rights are more important .

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
Branden
Mr. Hanna, Stroudsburg Junior High School
I do not think anyone should be able to search your phone without a warrant. It does not matter if they think that there is some sort of crime in your phone, or if they think it will help them to solve a crime by searching your phone. They MUST HAVE A WARRANT! Phones contain a lot of information. A lot of that information is private and should remain private. Whoever searches the phone may exploit the owner by sending out information that was meant to be kept between them ans then only.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Owen
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
No, I do not agree with the Supreme Court. This is because the police are only trying to stop bad things from happening and catch criminals. The Supreme Court seems to just be making it even harder for the police to track down criminals and catch them doing something illegal. The ruling making the police get a warrant in order to track down a criminal is just slowing down the process and giving the criminal more time to figure out how to get away with the crime and get rid of the evidence. Privacy rights should not over rule the right for police to search a cell phone.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Casie
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think the Supreme Court is right, police should have warrants to check your cell phone. It depends on what they are looking for, if they're just looking through your phone for nothing, if they think you did a crime they should get warrant first. Police dont just have the right to take your phone and search it unexpectedly. They need to have reasons and they have to be reasonable.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Valeria
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I don't agree with the Supreme Court that warrants should be required to search a cellphone.I think if the police see a connection between the person and something as horrible as murder they should be able to do anything they need to either prove the person innocent or throw them behind bars for doing something so cruel to someone. It makes it even harder for the ruling of law enforcement to arrest criminals. It takes the case to be solved twice as much time as it should, it makes things a lot harder than they should be. If the person who's phone they are searching doesn't want them to it is for a reason, if they are doing nothing illegal they shouldn't mind them going through it. Privacy rights are very important, but not as important as murder. They took away someone's life, their privacy rights should not be respected if there is an obvious link between the person who owns the phone and the murder.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Joshua B
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
In my honest opinion I think there should be a requirement that police should have a warrant to check your phone. A person has very personal stuff that police don't need to know, such as if a person took wedding photos. I don't think a warrant makes it too difficult because it the same as getting a warrant for searching a house of a suspected criminal. Everyone has rights, even a murderer. Privacy may not be important but since we have warrants for house why not cellphones? That is my opinion on if police need warrants to search your warrant.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg,Pennsylvania
Zachary
Mr.Hanna
I do not agree that the police should have a warrant to check a criminals cellphones. I think this because, in my opinon it would take too much time and the criminal might already have committed his/her crime. Also, I believe that if the police want to check somebody's phone or even my own phone i don't have a problem with that. They are just trying to protect us from harm and keep us safe. I think that it makes it harder for the police to catch a criminal if they have to go throught the whole warrant process. It is just a waste of time to me and makes it much more difficult for police to do their job. Finally, I don't think the privacy rights aren't that important if it comes to a criminal. I don't care who it is, if the police suspect a person to have done something bad I think that they should check their phone even if it "invades their privacy". These are my thoughts on this.

11/12/2014
Stroud sburg, Pennsylvania
Tessa
Mr. Hanna\Stroudsburg
I believe that there should be a warrant needed to let the police search your phone. People have very private information on them, such as credit card numbers and social security numbers. If something happened where there was a police officer who was trying to steal personal information and use it for a bad reason then it would be very easy for them to get the information.If the police believe there is a reason to search someone's phone they should get permission form a judge. Judges have an oath to tell the truth so they would truly believe there is a reason. People have the right to their own belongings and should be able to keep that. People need privacy.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg,PA
Benny
Mr. Hanna/Stroudsburg jhs
I think that the law enforcement should be aloud to search your phone without a warrant if you're a criminal and they believe you may be apart of another crime them they should be aloud to search the phone. Technology is now a huge part of humans lives now a days. Everyone has one.... And to be honest criminals probably have evidence or things they're hiding on their phone! They could be texting other people connected to a crime and so be it if there's mothering bad on the phone.... It doesn't hurt anyone so why not search it. In conclusion, I believe law enforcement should be able to search cell phones without a warrant.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Ray
Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
All though cell phone can help a lot in a case because they store a lot of information, I still believe we should protect our rights and the police should have a warrant to search our devices. If the police think it is necessary to search someone's phone, they need a warrant. The government should not be able to take away our rights. Our devices carry personal information and everyone who has a device should have the right of the 4th amendment as well as the rest of the amendments.

11/12/2014
Stroudsburg, PA
Gabrielle
Mr.Hanna/Stroudsburg JHS
I think the police should be aloud to check your phone under certain circumstances. Even though it is a violation of privacy it is an easy way for police to investigate. Many people hold their life with pictures and text messages on their phone. If there is a crime it will be easier for them if they just have to check your phone.

11/7/2014
New Orleans/LA
Allisyn
Mr.Greiner/Lusher Charter School
Due to the personal nature and attachment that people have to their cell phones, Warrants should be required to search the contents of a cellphone. These rulings respect the rights of the suspect to have privacy. If the suspects cell phone cannot be searched after consulting a judge, then it would not be a fair confiscation. The judge has sworn an oath to be just and will allow the searching of a persons cell phone if the suspicions seem sound. Privacy rights are more important than "gut feelings" of law enforcement officials. I believe that a cell phone is just an electronic version of personal records and should be treated with the same amount of respect to property.

10/30/2014
sidney
d-rock
sidney
i think they shouldn't search without a warrant. unless the person looks suspicious. He is acting strangely. then they will have a motive. so they can search their phone or other items that can conceal certain items they have used. that is my thought.

10/30/2014
Sidney/MT
Garett
Mr.Faulhaber, Sidney High
I think that the police should not be able to search your phone without a warrant. Your cellphone is private property just like our homes, if you want to committ us with a crime go get a warrant and search my cellphone. untill then no the police have no right.

10/30/2014
Murrieta California
Ali
Mr. Jabro Creekside High School
I believe that police should not be allowed to check your cellphone without a warrant no matter what the reason might be. We have a right to out privacy and if they don't have a warrant then they shouldn't be allowed to invade our privacy. I mean what if you have personal stuff on your phone or if you have peoples information, they shouldn't be allowed to go through all of that without a warrant.

10/23/2014
Murrieta, CA
Ziona M
Mr. Jabro / Creekside HS
Personally, I believe the police should be allowed to check cellphones only with a good enough reason to suspect that any suspicious activity might be going on . The ruling does make it difficult, only because the "suspect" can get rid of anything that was on the cellphone before the police can go and even get the warrant. I think this is only okay if they have a valid enough reason , to even do so.

10/21/2014
Murrieta California
Stephanie Folston
Mr. Jabro Creekside High School
I believe the police have the right to check your cellphone without a warrant only with a valid reason. The ruling makes it difficult to arrest criminals because the evidence on the cellphone can be erased before the warrant is issued. Even though the evidence can be found elsewhere like from cellphone records it would be faster without warrants having to be issued. As long as the system isn't being misused.

10/21/2014
Murrieta / Californa
isaac
Jabro / Creekside
I think that police are not allowed to search a phone a traffic stop or for almost no reason. If probable cause, or if the person has caused an accident and the police need to find out if they were texting or not. Getting warrants to search a phone would be pointless.

10/17/2014
spring
rc
ms russell dekaney
if police have to wait for a warrant to search phones that can be evidence that could save a life or stop a crime people have a right to privacy but if they use that to do crimes then they give up that right

10/17/2014
Houston/Texas
Misshaki
Mrs. Russell/Dekaney High School
I think police don't have the right to go through your phone without a search warrant because in the society we live in today, a phone is way more than a communication device. People keep their personal files in it and for a police officer to go through it without a warrant is just a violation of our constitutional rights as a citizen.

10/17/2014
Texas
Dion
Dekaney
I believe that the court ruling was ethically right but not smart. People knowing this will be able to get away with many things. But, on the other hand everyone has a right to privacy. Technology is changing the world, and i believe they will soon change the rules to things soon. The right to privacy with our cellphones wont last long. they are already starting to legalize marijuana and gay marriage. Search warrants could be next.

10/17/2014
Houston
Dion
Dekaney
I believe that the court ruling for privacy was good. the reason being is because it is still our property regardless.

10/17/2014
Murrieta, CA
Elizabeth Padilla
Mr.Jabro/Creekside HS
I believe that people should have a right to their own privacy and if the police do not have a warrant to check your cellphone than its not fine. If it turns out to be something important and they state a good reason to check your cellphone, then thats something different. Personally, i believe that just because theyre the law does not mean they have the right to snoop around in whatever your buisness is. In some cases, peoples lives are on thier cell phone, you adresses your emails your contacts, family, pictures, etc. its everything.

10/16/2014
Murrieta,CA
Vivian Cabral
Mr.Jabro/Creekside HS
I believe if the police don't have a warrant to check your cellphone then it is not fine, but if they check your phone without a good enough reason i don't think they have the right to. We as people are entitled to our privacy. I don't think just because they are the police they have the right. Just like a schools principle I don't think they should be able to. they should have a parents permission also. I also believe that if you are involved in a criminal crime and are a suspect to the matter then I feel the police should be able to. It all depends on the situation you are involved in.

10/16/2014
Murrieta California
Corrine
Jabro / Creeckside high school
Do the police have the right to search through your phone without a warrant? In my opinion, most defiantly not! we have privacy rights and that would be violating them. If the U.S or even just california wanted officers to search our phones they should have gave us the right to have privacy in the constition.

10/14/2014
Murrieta/California
Derek
Mr.Jabro/Creekside High School
If the police have a good enough reason they can do anything without a warrant anyway so yes mostly because we cant stop them from doing it if we wanted to. i mean they are here to protect us but recently they have been going on a power trip and doing things that have crossed the line. If the police are trying to find a suspect in a murder lets say and your one of the contacts in his/her phone, then i believe they have the right to look through to make sure your not his accomplice or something like that but nothing else justifies unwarranted search.

10/12/2014
Sidney/MT
Kory (Beast)
Mr. Faulhaber/Sidney High School
I believe that the police should not be able to search cellphones without a warrant. The Fourth Amendment protects U.S. citizens from unreasonable search and seizure of a person's home or belongings. As far as I'm concerned, a cellphone is a belonging, and a very important one which contains a lot of information about a person's life. So, the Fourth Amendment should apply to cellphones. If the police are certain that an individual is guilty of a crime, then police should get a warrant and search the phone. I believe that Americans should still have the same rights that they did at the founding of our nation even if technology is becoming greater.

10/12/2014
Sidney, Montana
Tate
Mr. Faulhaber/ Sidney High School
According to the Fourth Amendment which states "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized". I feel that if the police search your phone, they would need a warrant because the police feel that they need to. The ruling does not make it too difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals because they can not just base the facts off of someone's phone. The privacy rights are more important, I feel, because the police should not have the power to search your phone just because they feel that you are guilty of something.

10/7/2014
Murrieta / Ca
Miguel C.
Jabro / Creekside High School
I can go both ways with this but leaning mostly towards the opposing side. I don't think police should be able to search your phone just because they feel like you have drugs, or any other scenario. Yes police have the right to be suspicious but that doesn't justify the invasion of privacy. But it's not like our phones aren't already "watched" or under surveillance. But if the timing is right and the police happens to be there when a crime goes down, i think he can check the suspects phone to assure that he or she is guilty. Its all a matter of perspective and what the situation is.

10/2/2014
Irving/ Texas
Lidia
Bradley/ Nimitz
Good points! Well in my opinion I believe that the Supreme Courts do have reason for requiring warrants to be enforced before performing a search because we the people should have the right to privacy. At the same time we have to take in mind that just as the article states there are situations in which it is required to perform a search do to the suspicion of a certain crime. Taking this into consideration I do think that this ruling puts the authorities in a tight spot when having to actually get the warrant and then looking for the suspect. Like I said before there should be certain situations that must be exceptions. I think that our safety is much more valuable compared to our privacy rights.

10/2/2014
irving texas
nancy
Bradley/Nimitz HS
I believe that we shouldn't have our personal things searched, or looked through without our consent or warrant. what if there's something personal in there? i do believe however, that when it comes to specific cases like murder or a federal crime, the exception can be stretched. If cops suspect of a bigger crime than just "a expired license" i believe they have the right to search. With a proper warrant that is. In conclusion, police should have the right to search your phone, and and IF youre suspected of a higher crime.

10/1/2014
El Paso, Texas
nathaniel ruvalcaba
mr.tabutt
Honestly this can go two ways. The first is that no the can not because it is envading our space we all have to jave somthing to give is a state of mind that makes is unique or nobody is nobody. The second way this can go is if u are pulled over or are put in a situation with a cop and he runs a background and he finds somthing wrong with you and he feels that you are up to no good he does have the authority to check you but the should be a limt, you can't keep a person there while you seach I believe that he shuold only have six clicks to look for evidence. And that concludes my artical

10/1/2014
El paso texas
Eddie pichardo
mr.tabbut
i think police should have warrents to check ur phone because ur personal stuff is there and u have improtant stuff in there so i think the police should have warrents to check our phone... but this is a good idea beacuse police can find drug deals n find out who else they r selling it to n they can know where the next drug deal is gonna go down next n were

10/1/2014
El paso texas
Eddie pichardo
mr.tabbut
i think police should have warrents to check ur phone because ur personal stuff is there and u have improtant stuff in there so i think the police should have warrents to check our phone... but this is a good idea beacuse police can find drug deals n find out who else they r selling it to n they can know where the next drug deal is gonna go down next n were

10/1/2014
el paso texas
destiny marquez
ysleta high school
Many crimes do happen through social media.Some are sent through cell phones in my opinion i agree with the supreme court i believe they do have the right to search cell phones it does make it difficult because many people believe in the privacy policy and they want to fight there right but for the safety of society they have the right to search through cell phones .

9/30/2014
Irving TX
Azaria
Ms.Bradley/ Nimitz
Police should not be able to search a persons phone without a warrant. If they can’t search a home without a warrant they should not be able to search a phone without one. Phones hold a lot of personal stuff in them such as pictures, messages, website and email passwords and more. A phone pretty much contains everything to do with its owners life and searching through it without a warrant or permission is invading a person's privacy. If a police officer is convinced that a person has committed a crime there are other ways to prove it other than searching through that person's phone and invading their privacy.

9/30/2014
Murrieta,Ca
Elena
Mr.Jabro/Creekside Highschool
The fact that the law feels searching through someone's phone without a search warrant is ok, is just absolutely ridiculous. That is our private property, just as our home is, they should have no right to search through something so private. If they need a search warrant for our home why shouldn't they have one to search our most private possession? I think the government should see this as unjustice and require the law to be the same for houses, after all it is under search and seizure, the 4th amendment in the constitution.

9/29/2014
tacoma, WA
savannah
franklin pierce high school
I think the police should not be able to search ones phone without a warrant because it is an invasion of privacy. The text says "someone was charged with attempt murder because of the information that was on his phone". This is not a valid reason to charge someone with murder because the police invaded his privacy which invaded his rights. This was david leon. If they have a warrant when searching someones phone then it is valid

9/29/2014
Tacoma, Wa
Daniel
Graves
I believe that police shouldn't be able to look at people's phone without a warrant. We a have the right that prevents the police from searching our personal property or belonging without our consent or a warrant. This is also an invasion of or privacy because we have our whole life in our phone. There was a case in which a police man searched a lady's phone and he forwarded inappropriate photos of herself, for her husband, to himself. Anyways, that what I was think.

9/29/2014
tacoma
rogelio
franklin pierce
i think that police should not go to your privacy things just because they want or without a warrant.if they suspect that you are doing something bad for example selling drugs or pictures of guns i think its okay but with a warrant first

9/29/2014
Tacoma/Washington
Jaclyn L-K
Graves/Franklin Pierce High School
For example, if someones phone is being searched for no reason, I believe that is unjust and should not be allowed without a warrant, but if someone is a suspect of a criminal charge, and there is threat, or a linked suspicion that their cellphone may be involved, and holding more evidence, then I agree that it is more acceptable to search someones phone.

9/29/2014
Tacompton WA
C.D.E.
Mrs. Graves Franklin Pierce High School
I disagree with the supreme court's decision to convict the criminals based on cell phone information. According to the Fourth Amendment, the evidence that was found in the phones cannot be used in the court of law as it was searched without a warrant. Phones may have potentially harmful information on them, but they also have private information that the owner does not wish to share.

9/29/2014
tacoma wa
Marisol Gonzalez
Mrs. Graves/ Franklin pierce high sschool
I think that the police has no right to check your phone without a warrant because you have the rights for privacy. They can just come to your house ad search all your things with out permission. The only way for the police to search your phone is to have a warrant and a good reason why they need to search you personal things.

9/29/2014
Tacoma,Washington
Michelle Lozano Dela Rosa
Mrs.Graves/Franklin Pierce High School
I think they should need a warrant to search someones phone. The 4th amendment says that you need a warrant to search peoples belongings or seize a persons home if they have reasonable suspicion. They need to have a probable cause of why they are going to search someones phone and if they dont then they will just be getting in their privacy for no reason. it also says that the evidence they find cannot be used in court if searched without a warrant and that that has been the exclusionary rule. So even if they search the peoples belongings they wont be able to use it. The people may not have anything in their phones and still be searched plus we have all our information on it and no one can get into it without peoples consent.

9/29/2014
Tacoma, WA
Nina
Ms. Graves
I agree that police should invade your cellphone or use it as an evidence for your crime IF they have a warrant and a reason to do it. "That means unless the police have a warrant and a “reasonable suspicion” that a person has committed a crime, they can’t just show up and search a house." Like David Leon's, police found pictures on his phone. My concern is - They have to have a WARRANT to invade someone's privacy.

9/29/2014
Tacoma
Anthony K.
Mrs. Graves
I believe to protect the public, police should be able to search your privacy if there is a reasonable doubt. Just as stated within the text new technology is making it easier and easier for criminals to do their trade and making it harder for law enforcement to do theirs. As we progress through time technology will only continue to grow and making it easier for criminals to get away with larger crimes.`Fight Avery R.

9/29/2014
Tacoma/washington
Trenton
Mrs Graves/Franklin pierce highschool
Police should not be able to look through your phone without permission but they should be able to look through it if they have a probable cause like maybe they think that you are going to blow something up or they have a great suspicion that you are going to do something dangerous or in harm to another citizen.

9/29/2014
Tacoma/wa
Mary
Franklin Pierce
I agree that police cant search your cell phone without a warrant because there is so many different personal items and things that are in your phone that the government should not see. In this, i believe that they would be going to far in searching your things. Although if you are part of a crime then i believe that a warrant should be written to go through your information to get ahold of the information.

9/29/2014
Tacoma, washington
Avery
Mrs. Graves/ Frnaklin
I believe that warrants should be required to search a cellphone, considered it acts like a backpack would, but with personal information. Cell phones today are almost an extension of their owners, and should be treated with such respect. I agree with the supreme courts decision, due the absence of a warrant, even though their was an illegal activity taking place. Its an invasion of our 4th amendment and privacy, and can grant the opportunity of falsely accusing an innocent, and wrongfully searching them. Having rights and privacy is what separates us as a nation from those of extreme corruptness and power.

9/29/2014
tacoma
larry
franklin pierce high school
i beleive that it is the ok thing to do becuase it is ultimatley for the safety and protection that may bring justice overall. whether it be a crime already commmited or even stop a crime from being commited

9/29/2014
Washington
Krista B.
Mrs. Graves/FPHS
I believe that the police shouldn't search your cellphone without a warrant, and that the Supreme Court was right to require a warrant to search a suspect's phone. A more reasonable way of handling this situation is obtaining the phone, but not checking through it until a warrant is approved for doing so. "The Fourth Amendment prevents the government from conducting unreasonable search and seizure of a person’s home and belongings." Even if there is suspicion upon someone, seizing their highly personal device and going through it is obstructing privacy rights. If any evidence were found, "the evidence they find cannot be used in court – that’s known as the exclusionary rule." That would mean even if they could be convicted of the crimes accused of/suspicious of, they couldn't use it in court in the first place- it would be pointless and a harder case to carry out.

9/29/2014
Tacoma/Wa
Isaiah
Mrs.Graves
Absolutely, in order for a police officer to search a persons phone they need a warrant. just because one is behind a badge that does not mean my rights are taken away when confronted with him.

9/29/2014
tacoma wa
iain
ms. graves
of course they should have to have a warrant to search your phone if your phone is a belonging of yours that has separate functions then just the object it self as in photos, call logs, and messages then the government should have to have a warrant to search it.

9/29/2014
Tacoma, WA
Shelby
Mrs. Graves, Franklin Pierce High School
Warrants should be required to search a cellphone, but confiscation of the object until a warrant is attained should be fine. "The Fourth Amendment prevents the government from conducting unreasonable search and seizure of a person’s home and belongings" which shows that it is illegal to search the device without a warrant, however, "a search of a cellphone, even a basic flip phone, could yield much more information about a suspect than a simple search of his pockets," which could help cases excel, and catch an unimaginable amount of criminals. It says nothing about it being illegal to confiscate the evidence, get a warrant, then go down to evidence and search the device.

9/29/2014
tacoma washington
Nick
Franklin peirce
Yes I agree!!!!!!!

9/29/2014
Tacoma, Wa
Malik
Mrs. Graves Franklin Pierce High School
Of course. Just like all other personal information that needs to be warranted for access, our cellphones are ne different.

9/26/2014
Murrieta Ca.
Derek C.
Mr Jabro
I think police should not be able to invade your privacy with no reason as to why. For example if they suspect you or one of your colleagues is doing criminal activity they should get a warrent to search your phone and messages to find proof of it. If they do not they move on and continue their day and you yours. But if they just tell you to give them your phone or any personal device really that has personal information on it, then it is an invasion of privacy for reasons they cannot prove and is a violation of the constitution and what not. So if a police officer asks you to give them your phone so they can get information on a person, ask them to show a warrent before they look so you know that it is strictly for protection and not personal gain.

9/26/2014
murrieta, CA
mickey
mr.jabro /creekside high school
i think that the right we have of privacy still goes in order with our cellphones ,so i agree with the fact that an officer needs to have a search warrant to go through our phones, because that's an invasion of privacy and that's not right in any shape or form ,i think if someone is doing something illegal on their phones and the cops don't have search warrant , then they shouldn't be accounted for it ,if the cops do have a warrant then that's a different story , the person being held under arrest can't sue the officer for going through the phone ,but the officer should also let the person being held under arrest should be informed of the warrant , to avoid confusion

9/23/2014
Irving/Texas
Hope
Bradley/Nimitz
I believe that the Supreme Court was right to have the requirement of a warrant to search a person’s or even a suspect’s phone. A phone is apart of a person’s property. We store our personal information in it, we keep the object in our possession, leading to the assumption that the phone belongs to us, and that no one should have access to said phone without consent. Like a woman or young lady’s purse for example. A purse is someone’s personal property that no one should have the right to go through unless the woman/girl’s permission has been granted. It’s the same with a cellular device, only it reaches around to everyone with a phone, and not just women or young girls. I do not think the court’s ruling on this subject makes it even more difficult to arrest criminals because like the process has always been. If law enforcement has a suspicion about a suspect they were following up on, then they would just have to get a warrant, Plain and simple. Don’t think that just because a phone is a faster way of receiving information in record time, it doesn't mean the rights of a citizen should be violated just to close a case at a faster pace. It’s unconstitutional.

9/22/2014
Murrieta
Raquell
Mr.Jabro / Creekside High School
I agree with the Supreme Court that there should be a warrant in order to search a cellphone. Us as Americans worked very hard for our freedom and privacy and that should still be our right. This will make it hard for law enforcement to make any arrest however, if they have evidence to give to a judge for a warrant to check the cellphone then it should not be a problem. Our privacy is also important. We Americans worked hard to earn our privacy and freedom and that is why they need warrants to check our cellphones because our phones are our private property so if they search it they are violating our privacy.

9/21/2014
West Valley UT
Malcolm
Gailey Hunter High School
I do not believe that police have the right to unlawfully search anything, this is the United States, a free country. However, I also believe that in order to keep this the country it is today that it is necessary to keep people safe and police officers are assigned with that task. And if there is a crime or someone getting hurt that can be avoided by searching a cell phone then an officer should be allowed to search it.

9/20/2014
Murrieta
Justin
Mr. Jabro / Creekside High Schol
I believe that they should have the right to, after all we should do all we can to prevent crime as much as possible. I never understood the right to have privacy to your phone/laptop/etc, because if you're doing something bad, the government and police officers should be aware. Everything you do online is documented and stored, and officers are here to enforce the rules. People should just not do anything bad, so that their worries disappear on this matter.

9/18/2014
murrieta ca
bianca
jabro/ creekside high school
I agree with the supreme court. I believe it is okay to search cellphones with a warrant under the right circumstances. If the reason isn't too important then there shouldn't be a reason to need to look through somebody else's privacy. People in the past didn't need cell phones for evidence, if they can't find other work of evidence they probably are not doing their job right.

9/18/2014
Wheatfield/Indiana
Chelsea White
NORWINE / Kankakee Valley High School
Personally, I feel as if the police should not search your cell phone without a warrant. Just like your home, your cell phone is your personal and private property. If the reason does not help a crime, I believe cell phone's should not be looked at by others. In today's time, police can search a cell phone with probable cause, but I feel as if that is wrong. A warrant should be needed just like a home, or else this violates one's personal rights. All in all, a search warrant should DEFINITELY be needed to search a cell phone.

9/18/2014
Medaryville, IN
Monica
Norwine - KVHS
Yes. I believe that police can search your phone without a warrant as long as there is a probable cause. If there is no obvious threat then it is none of their business what is on your personal phone. However, if there is reason to believe that someone is at risk of being hurt then I believe they have very right to check without a warrant for the protection of others.

9/18/2014
Wheatfield/Indiana
Hanna
Norwine/Kankakee Valley High School
I believe that unless their is a confirmed threat, cellphones fall under the category of personal property, therefore the Fourth Amendment clearly protects you from unreasonable searchers without a warrant. Technology has become such an important and personal part of life, where searching and seizing them without cause is unlawful. Both sides of the issue can be strongly argued, due to it's controversial content.

9/18/2014
Wheatfield, IN
Serena
Mr. Norwine/KVHS
They would need a warrant, and real proof. If they have probable cause, that should be enough to look into it, but on a very limited basis. We have a right to privacy, although it was not originally explicitly stated in the Constitution. To just invade privacy and to look just based on a hunch would go against the rights of a person. They are innocent until proven guilty.

9/17/2014
Murrieta CA
Lily
Mr.Jabro Creekside Highschool
I do agree that police should have a warrant to search your cell phone,unless your a wanted criminal with a history of violence. It does make it more difficult to arrest criminals,but it also protects the privacy of civilians. Privacy rights are important,unless you have a known history of crime.

9/17/2014
Charlottesville/Virginia
Lilli
Dr.Huneycutt/ Monticello High School
You pay for your phone. Therefor it is your property. It is law that government can not search your property without a warrant or your permission. Also without probable cause what is the reason to search a phone. I have nothing to hide so why should the government search my phone. If they asked I would show them my phone but if they didn't i would plead the 5th amendment 5th protection right, which states government can not take or search my property without permission.

9/17/2014
Charlottesville, VA
Stephanie Rauda
Dr.Huneycutt/Monticello High School
Cellphones should not be able to be searched just like a house, car, etc. they need a search warrant. A police officer knows what they can and can't do and it is in a law that a search warrant is needed. If a police suspects that there's evidence on your phone they simply need to get a warrant.

9/17/2014
charlottesville
Tanasia
Dr.Huneycutt Mhs
I think that it depends on the situation. If the police think that you maybe a suspect or someone knows that you have done something than thy shouldn't have a warrant. If they want to search your phone without a reason than they should get a warrant

9/17/2014
Charlottesville/ Virginia
Kayla
Dr. Huneycutt/ Monticello High School
I believe that a police officer should have a warrant in order to search a cell phone because it is a violation of privacy if there isn't a warrant. Yes it would be harder to arrest criminals if they don't have a warrant, but if an innocent person was pulled over for a back tail light being out then the police have no reason to search their cell phone in the process. If there is a real reason that the police feel is necessary to search the phone than that is a different story, but I personally still think that a warrant must be obtained before anything on the phone can be observed.

9/17/2014
Charlottesville, Virgina
Gabby
Dr. Huneycutt
In most cases, I would say that I don't want people snooping through my cell phone without permission, however I would so much rather have criminals arrested, than have my rights potentially violated. If there is a reasonable suspicion, law enforcement officers should be able to check through a cell phone. If you're not doing anything wrong, then why would you worry about it.

9/17/2014
VA
Leslie
Dr. Huneycutt
I think it's a good thing that they cant just search your cell phone record, because yes it's a violation of space. But I do understand the frustration that police officers have about finding out information. They would probably think it's easier to have access to everyone's records and then if they fins something suspicious in texts, then that can allow them to issue a search warrant on something else. It could be a good thing, but I think it should say how it is now.

9/16/2014
Covington, Louisiana
Maggie
Mr. Pennington
I personally believe that cell phones should not be searched without a warrant. Cellphones now a days have records of your entire life, from pictures to banking information. If you can't search a home or a car without a warrant or probable cause. Therefore, I personally think cellphones should fall under the same category. If there's a real reason for the phone to be looked through, police have the right. Otherwise, they can't just take it from your car and demand your passcode. That's a violation of privacy and your human rights. They should have to have a warrant.

9/15/2014
Irving, TX
Jonathan
Mrs. Bradley Nimitz High School
The search of cell phones without a warrant can be argued either way. I believe that it is an invasion of privacy and should not be allowed, unless there is a probable cause. Just like times are changing and technology is advancing so are the techniques used by criminals and bad guys. Searching a cell phone, in my eyes, should be allowed if and only if the investigator has a reasonable reason. Maybe he sees that the suspect sent a text or had a phone call. If he searches and finds that he sent a message to carry out a crime or of some sort they avoid the problem. When it comes to public safety and an individual's rights i rather be safe then sorry. So in all as long as there is a probable and reasonable cause for the search I am okay with a warrant-less search but otherwise it should not be allowed.

9/15/2014
California(a.k.a the best state)
Angel
Jabro Creekside Highschool
Alright, from the beginning of the topic itself, "Should police be able to search your cellphone without a warrant?'. This topic is contradicting itself 1000 times over. If i were to ask a judge, "what is a warrant?". A warrant is a a document issued by a legal or government official authorizing the police or some other body to make an arrest, search premises, or carry out some other action relating to the administration of justice. SO, if they know what the hell a warrant is then why are they going against it? Why do police ALWAYS try to get around or act higher than the LAW. This topic is irrelevant, COPS CANNOT GO AGAINST THE LAW, PERIOD. As a matter of fact they should make a new topic on here,"How many times must a Police officer try to create new laws before realizing that they are beyond corrupt and don't do there job like there supposed to?" the answer: Almost EVERY single one.

9/14/2014
Washington NJ
Steven M.
Rokosny/Warren Hills
Privacy as a citizen of the United States is vital to our freedom and liberties. There is no reason for the government and government agencies to have all of our phone calls and texts recorded. The right to privacy is inalienable in a democracy such as ours. You cannot go into somebody's house and search it without a warrant for the same reason you shouldn’t be able to tap into somebody elses phone. The most important information many people have is on their phones. It can tell anybody looking about their personality, hobbies, work lives, and unlimited interpersonal information. For example, when I went to the dentist a woman walked in and had to fill out paperwork but had to charge her phone before she could’ve wrote down her social security number because her social security number was on her phone. All of the stuff you’ll find by searching a house you can find evidence of by tapping somebodies phone which is why it is unconstitutional for our government to partake in this. In the ruling of the police force’s right to tap into somebodies phone Chief Justice John G. Roberts said, “Cell-phones are not the same as wallets or pocket litter, more substantial privacy interests are at stake when digital data is involved.” This ruling made it illegal to tap into a cell phone as a law enforcement officer but not illegal for government agencies such as the NSA to do so. There was an exception put into place allowing the immediate search of cellphones by a law enforcement officer without a warrant in the event of an immediate and imminent danger. Of course there have been many situations in which getting a warrant would've taken too long for it be an effective practice but invasion of a citizen's privacy is just as bad if not worse. Tapping into my iPhone and saving everything in it without my consent is just as devastating as going into my house, and should be equally illegal.

9/12/2014
Washington/NJ
Sarah H
Rokosny/Warren Hills
As an American, one is guaranteed certain unalienable rights. Many Americans are quick to defend this-however what exactly is it that we are defending? As our culture grows more and more complex, technology and power distributed across the border, the vague bubble defining our rights only stretches so far. There are reasonable arguments for and against our rights to technology. Cell phones, have given Americans this immense power-with little to no authority. One opposed to unwarranted cell phone searches, may be incline to point out despite the dangers this power can pose, it is our Fourth Amendment Right to keep it. They fail to realize that giving this power to all, is equivalent to turning our backs on crime, endangering ourselves. Crime must be addressed wherever there is probable cause, and Americans must make sacrifices to obtain the privilege of security and safety. Warrants are not always quickly obtained, and crime is time sensitive. There is no reason that we should deliver power to the hands of a corrupt society, turn our backs, and expect to secure our safety, or the safety of our rights.

9/12/2014
Washington/New Jersey
Roberto S
Rokosny/Warren Hills
Probably the most important issue presenting itself in modern politics is that of the extent we allow the government into our personal lives under the pretense of taking care of us. How far will the public edge backwards towards the cliff over no return until we decide to put our foot down and say that the measures that are to protect us from crime are crime themselves? I believe that this catch-all access into the individual's psyche, the amalgamation of their life events and aspects that is the social smartphone is the tipping point, the "sacred" item whose privacy must be protected in order for Americans to retain some semblance of a free people. This is not to say that the government does not already have access to the items we place onto our portable autobiographies. Ever since Edward Snowden dropped the bomb about the NSA having their nose in our business and cataloging what it smells for later (my use of the word "bomb" in this sentence was intentional, as it will surely send up a red flag) and the full scope of the Patriot Act, we've known that Uncle Sam can open his war chest and pull out surgical tools to pick our lives apart. Also, any phone that uses data for telecommunications has their discourses and recordings saved at some point throughout the network, discourses and recordings that can now be sold to the big guys in the sky. So, our privacy has and will be infringed by the government, there is no denying that. But the authority that can prosecute for domestic offenses, breakage of policy, civil disobedience? The authority that can put us behind bars for the slightest infraction (and as we know, infractions run wild when we plug into the Net)? Should this public organization really be given full rain to invade our lives and document our realities on a whim? I think not. I think that the United States should not condone this action by the Police; the United States should recognize that this would be the equivalent of breaking and entering. Enough.

9/12/2014
Washigton, New Jersey
Anthony V
Mrs. Rokosney
I believe that the decision of the supreme court is correct in the reasoning. The reason behind it was because the decision was simply constitutional in relation to the fourth amendment. The way that the supreme court works is to define things as constitutional and to create precedents from these decisions. In the future I can see that future laws will include legitimizing surveillance on mobile devices and other personal items.

9/12/2014
Washington/New Jersey
Kemdi O
Rokosny/Warren Hills Regional High School
Despite the fact that privacy is an important factor of American lives, but a person's cellphone should be considered as an item to be observed during a search warrant. In our world today, technology is so advanced that it is able to carry one's worldly possessions such as social security numbers, billing information, and especially (maybe the most vital) text messages. Almost all cellphones are advanced enough to carry all sources of information, so there is no reason for the police (with a valid warrant) to not search a person's cellphone. If there is a valid warrant then the law permits that law enforcement has the right to search that phone.

9/12/2014
Washington/New Jersey
Joelle D
Rokosny/Warren Hills
Warrants are one of the only protections that civilians have against the police. And with the exceptions in which a police officers conducts impromptu searches, the person being searched is aware that they are being searched. Whereas a warrant-less search of a cellphone does not notify the user of the cellphone of the police search. It was fair of the Supreme Court to deny police the right to search phones without a warrant and people should continue to be protected. Although there is no affirmative right to privacy in the United States, it was the intentions of the Founders to protect the privacy of all citizens. People may claim that their cell phones do not contain any evidence of crimes and that they are not afraid of the government knowing the information on their phone but it is not for everyday citizens to decide what is legal and illegal. It is the government that decides and we must protect ourselves from the evasive nature of searching phones.

9/12/2014
Washington/NJ
Tyler H.
Rokosny/Warren Hills
At some point, the general pedestrian must realize that cell phones are more than a commodity, but rather a resource. The power cell phones manifest is more than arbitrary circuitry. Cell phones contain a network, a relationship, an identity. Unfortunately, when this near limitless resource has the potential to be an implement for evil, people cannot deny the necessity for its unique involvement in law enforcement. Bad people exist, and denial of their presence is simply ignorance. Gone are the days that bad people only work through tangibility. People must accept that action is required in allowing the law to intercept and utilize this resource. If you have something to hide, then you may need to reevaluate your methods of discretion. Safety is not a viable sacrifice for comfort, and if you value the former in any way, the latter should be regarded and understood as a privilege, not a right.

9/12/2014
Washington, NJ
Christian
Warren Hills
Chief Justice Roberts is justified in his explanation. Just because technology has advanced so that a person's personal information is now digital, the fact does not change the fourth amendment's requirement of probable cause for a police search. Additionally, the argument that that the NSA gets to search people's phones would be invalid in this scenario because this is regarding petty criminal cases and not issues of national security.

9/12/2014
Washington, NJ
Luke
Rokosny/Warren Hills
“These are the times that try men’s souls” words spoken from Thomas Paine and the world we live in certainly still applies to this. We live in a world full of hate and crime. The Supreme Court ruling is completely invalid and null. Shouldn’t we have nothing to hide on our phones. The justice system never had outlined whether or not tapping phones is constitutional or not. If you ask somebody what if having law enforcement look at a text chances could stop a terrorist attack they would always say to look at the text. We all (myself included) can talk the talk, but not always walk the walk. President Obama stopped at least two known terrorist attacks in our nation’s homeland through the NSA and the use of intelligence. It’s tough giving up personal liberties, but to stop crime and keep security sign me up.

9/12/2014
Washington/New Jersey
Sara
Mrs. Rokosny
Cellphones are an extension of our privacy. To exploit someone for information, however much they may be suspected, is wrong at any state. One of the key ideals of the criminal program is "innocent until proven guilty" and to completely go around that statement is unlawful and against the democracy we strive for as a country. The Supreme Court had the utmost right to rule against the police force searching cellphones. Warrants are in the justice system to prevent accidents and from there being unreasonable searches and the consequences that come with it. Privacy rights should always be protected for the citizens of free countries, and the day that their, our rights are infringed upon, is the day our democracy will crumble into the hands of tyranny.

9/12/2014
Washington/New Jersey
Antonia
Rokosny/Warren Hills
I agree with the ruling of the Supreme Court. Warrants should most definitely be required in order to search an individual's cellphone. Privacy rights are very important, so the use of warrants makes it easier to address such issues in this type of situation. Although issuing warrants takes some time, it does not necessarily make things more difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals. I personally think it would be easier because warrants legitimize issues which is highly necessary. We have the right to unreasonable search and seizure by the Fourth Amendment. We need to protect our citizens while still being "professional" and orderly. Warrants are orderly.

9/12/2014
Washington, NJ
Emily L
Rokosny/Warren Hills
Without probable cause the authorities should have no right to search our cellphones. However, in the case of an emergency if trying to find a link for a case requires authorities to search cellphones even without physical evidence should be allowed. If one has nothing to hide then why not clear their names and rule out another loose end and save time in an investigation? Technology now holds our identities. If cops are allowed to search a suspects pockets, than any technological device they own should also be included in those boundaries considering how much more information they hold. Again, if you know you are innocent then prove it by not objecting to a cellphone check. If you happen to be a suspect then anything they would normally search to prove you are or aren't guilty should now include technology because that is where everything is going to be hidden, as opposed to concrete evidence.

9/12/2014
Washington, NJ
Matt F.
Rokosni/Warren Hills
I think that the Police should only be able to search your cell phone under certain circumstances. If someone is pulled over for speeding or any other petty little crime they should not be able to violate to the privacy of a person without a probable cause. However if someone is possibly intoxicated it should be possible for a police officer to search the phone for any messages that could link them to a drug deal or something like that.

9/12/2014
Washington/New Jersey
Meg F
Rokosny/Warren Hills
Technology nowadays can be very powerful. Yet it can be very pointless too. If they police suspect someone of dangerous behavior and have a reasonable cause, they should be allowed to search the suspects phone. In doing so they will be able to stop the threat and if the suspect is innocent they they can go along their happy way. Privacy is important but so is safety. If one has nothing to hide then one should not be bothered by the police searching for a few mere minutes for criminal intent.

9/12/2014
Washington/ New Jersey
Henna S.
Mrs. Rokosny/ Warren Hills High School
Privacy is very important, yet I think it can be bent when dealing with the safely of others. I believe that if police are under the impression that the safety of the American citizens is being threatened. They should be able to check people's phones. I do think we are entitled on our own privacy, but when it comes down to it, I am more concerned about my own safety, and the safety of others. It is a completely different story if the search was random and without any real reason. Since I have pictures of friends on my phone I would not want the police snooping through those. If someone was caught with drugs and that could be linked to another crime, the police should be able to check their phones.

9/12/2014
Washington, New Jersey
Patrick F.
Rokosny
I feel that the Supreme Court's decision on the searching and usage of someone's cellphone to convict them for a crime was completely the right choice. The fact of the matter is that neither Jones not Kyllo posed any threat to the police, therefore they had no reason to bypass the step of getting a search warrant. Another reason that this was the right decision was that bypassing the step of getting a search warrant goes against the Fourth Amendment. The decision of the Supreme Court was the right one, however that doesn't justify the crimes that Jones and Kyllo committed.

9/12/2014
Washington, NJ
Matthew B
Rokosny/ Warren Hills
My views on this situation are somewhat split. Every American can agree that privacy is a very important thing. Part of me believes that officials should be required to obtain a warrant to check individuals' phones or other personal belongings. This is protected by the fourth amendment of the Bill of Rights. However, the other side of me does believe that police and other officials should be able to check without a warrant if they feel there is probable cause. What if the police did not check the trunk of Riley's car? who knows what he was going to do with the weapons. There needs to be a point in the middle where they can have this power, but know how not to abuse it.

9/12/2014
Mansfield / New Jersey
Mark
Rokosny / Warren Hills Regional High School
Although I have no problem with the NSA searching citizens' phones, I do believe that in a criminal case, a warrant should be obtained to search a person's phone. There is a difference between searching for potential nation security threats, and trying to solve a crime. Much of a person's life is on his or her cell phone, and unless there is an immediate danger (whatever it may be), a police officer should have a warrant to search it.

9/12/2014
Irving TX
mark
nimitz
I completely agree with the Supreme Court's ruling. Police need to know their boundaries. If they have a reason to conduct searches on an individual's privacy, then they should get the proper warrant. As is stated we are protected of unreasonable searches by the fourth amendment. Our amendments are not laws but our rights as American citizens.

9/12/2014
Wildomar California
Ashley
Mr.Jabro Creekside Highschool
Cellphones are considered a persons belonging and the 14 amendment says law enforcement needs a warrant to search through them. Even if the job for people working in law enforcement gets a bit more difficult they still have to respect a person's privacy and find a way to obtain a warrant justly. A cellphone has very private information that people choose to keep to themselves, police should understand this and do the right thing, obtain a warrant.

9/12/2014
Irving/Texas
Carlos
Bradley/Nimitz
Privacy is one of the most important things to us. If an officer checks our phone without a warrant then they might as well come into our house without a warrant. Our cellphone or technology itself has become so crucial in our lives. For example,we depend on our cellphones on the calendar, photos, and especially our messages. Therefore, if an officer wants to check my phone he/she must bring a warrant before checking my privacy.

9/11/2014
Irving Tx
Alejandro
Ms. Bradley Nimitz High School
The Fourth Amendment clearly states that citizens, even suspected criminals, are protected from warrantless search and seizure of property. The only exceptions are if the suspect is carrying anything that warrants seizure by the police captors due to the immediate danger that the object possesses, i.e. guns, drugs, or other weapons. In the cases of Riley and Wurie, they had yet to be confirmed of their charges, and the seizure of their phone,which did not pose an immediate and present danger, immediately violated their Amendment rights, and damaged the legitimacy of their sentencing.

9/11/2014
Irving TX
Gabriel M
Bradley/ Nimitz High School
I believe that the government should protect our privacy, in any way even if it’s on our phone. The article made the point that the information on our phones cannot cause any immediate harm to the police ,so they should not be able to search our phones without a warrant. We are all entitled to our privacy as U.S. citizens and pride ourselves on our rights and they should not be violated. Although police may suspect people of a crime they should not be able to invade our privacy without our consent or a warrant.

9/11/2014
Irving/Texas
Flor
Bradley/Nimitz
In my opinion, the police shouldn't be able to search your cellphone without a warrant if they were doing it out of the blue or with no real evidence of accusations. It is a completely different story if they have legitimate evidence, and it’s not just “ I think this suspect is selling drugs, let’s stick a gps to his car and follow him around” type of deal happening. I very much agree with the supreme court that police should have warrants to search my cellphone. The thing is that since, me personally, there is nothing I am hiding in my cellphone that would be of any evidence to a crime the police might uncover, realistically thinking, there would be have no problem with them checking my phone, just for the mere satisfaction of me saying “HA I told you so.” But that doesn't mean that I would appreciate them snooping around my pictures of my friends and family and the messages I send to them. I as a citizen have the right to to keep my private life (ironically enough) private, and don’t have to let the police check my cellphone whatsoever.

9/10/2014
Irving/Tx
Carolyn
Ms. Bradley/Nimitz
Privacy is important to everyone. Content such as banking accounts, emails, messages, pictures, notes, maps/locations, and all kinds of apps can be found in one device. In this era, teenagers, adults, business people, and just about anyone who has a cell phone holds their entire life in their phone. The government is obsessing over knocking down every single crime, which isn't possible. Today's technology is so advance, the government can find multiple ways of preventing crimes, without the use of invading one's privacy. Officers should be required to search a cell phone only with a warrant. Breaking into cell phones, breaks peoples' rights and maintaining the peoples' privacy rights is far more important than the government becoming too controlling. The national government should not oversee the rights of the People.

9/10/2014
Irving/Texas
Tyler
Ms. Bradley/Nimitz High School
If a police officer could take your cellphone (your personal office assistant, camera, and communications device,) without having any just reason to do so, it would be a blatant disregard of the law. As American citizens we have our rights, among them the right to not have our property subject to unlawful search and seizure without a reasonable suspicion. Honestly, if there is a reason to believe that someone is involved in a particular felony or crime, then the police can get a warrant from the designated powers, and then proceed with handling the investigation without violating someone’s rights. Just because it fits in our hands doesn’t mean that it isn’t private property very similar to someone’s house or car. If you need to read through my cellphone I need to read through a warrant first.

9/10/2014
Irving/TX
Briana
Bradley/Nimitz
The police should not be allowed to to search cellphone’s without a warrant if there is not immediate danger, however if the search of a cell phone will protect citizen’s lives at that given moment it is reasonable to search it without a warrant. SInce a cellphone holds so much information and nothing is actually erased from it, when there is no immediate danger police officers should get a warrant before searching a cell phone. This in no way makes it too difficult for law enforcement to arrest criminals because in this nation we have created ways of making things easier, such as technology specialists, that could find anything erased or not on a cellphone. The safety of us citizens, should come before our privacy.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville/Virginia
Alex
Ms.Bailey/Monticello High School
I believe that if there is any sort of suspicion towards a person, the police should have not just a warrant but a bunch of evidence to back up their reason. Cell phones mean basically everything to people these days, they keep everything in their phones. Searching through it is an invasion of privacy. However, if the person knows they haven't committed a crime then they shouldn't worry about it, the police shouldn't judge what you have on your phone. So honestly, if it was me, I wouldn't mind as long as they have strong evidence.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville / Viginia
Bruce
Mrs.Bailey / Monticello High Shcool
I believe they would need a warrant to search your phone. You have a right to your privacy and if they just take it and look through it then that's and invasion. They shouldn't be able to look through your phone without probable cause at least.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville/Virginia
Alex
Ms.Bailey/Monticello High School
I believe that if there is any sort of suspicion towards a person, the police should have not just a warrant but a bunch of evidence to back up their reason. Cell phones mean basically everything to people these days, they keep everything in their phones. Searching through it is an invasion of privacy. However, if the person knows they haven't committed a crime then they shouldn't worry about it, the police shouldn't judge what you have on your phone. So honestly, if it was me, I wouldn't mind as long as they have strong evidence.

9/10/2014
Irving,TX
Martin
Ms.Bradley/ Nimitz High School
Police should not be able to search your phone without a warrant because it’s an invasion of privacy rights. In order to search a house a police needs a search warrant, so why wouldn’t that apply to a phone? Just because there are criminals doing bad things and communicating through phones, the rest of the people should not suffer for other peoples wrong doings. It’s illegal and it should remain that way.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville/virginia
Noah
Ms.Bailey / monticello high school
I think another problem is police altering the contents of your phone. There are hundreds of examples of people capturing video of police , and in many of the videos , the police are not following the guide lines set for them by the police department. If the person who captured the video was arrested simply for taking the video, the police could then delete the video from the phone. I think That's a problem.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville/Virginia
George
Ms. Bailey/Monticello High School
I think that if the police have other proof that you are connected to a crime, such as you are carrying weapons or drugs, they should be allowed to search your phone since the have a "reasonable suspicion" at that point. I also think that if you drop your phone somewhere and the police use it as evidence that you were part of a crime then that is entirely legal. At that point they arent taking something from you because the phone was not on your person.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville/ Virginia
Kaitlin
Mrs. Bailey/ Monticello High School
I believe that they should need a warrant to search your belongings. If they need a warrant to search your house, then they should need a warrant to search your cellphone too. It's an invasion of privacy. If they suspected something and needed to look through someone's phone bad enough, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be too hard to get a warrant for it.

9/10/2014
Charlottesville/ Virginia
Gabriela
Ms.Bailey / Monticello High School
I believe that if somebody is suspected of committing a crime, their belongings should be checked with or without a warrant. If they didn't do anything wrong, then they shouldn't be worried about what the police could possibly find. If phones were searched all the time, I'm sure a lot of people would be arrested by now. If I was in such case were they thought I had committed a crime or something illegal, but I know I hadn't, I would rather them check whatever I have than being punished for something I didn't do. So I don't agree, if they suspect of someone committing a crime or something illegal, they should check their cellphones, and if they are innocent they have nothing to hide.

9/9/2014
Irving TX
Katherine W
Ms. Bradley Nimitz High School
I believe that without a warrant or reasonable suspicion, police should not be able to search cell phones. As the article stated, the average smartphone user has downloaded 33 apps that can basically tell anyone almost everything about someone. With that much information in a phone it would be a HUGE invasion of privacy to search through someone's phone. Although some people's phones should be searched through, most of the public aren't drug dealers, murderers, terrorists, etc. So as a law abiding citizen I do not believe that the general public should suffer through watching a police officer search through their phone because of the small percent of criminals. Also, if someone's phone needs to be searched through then it shouldn't be that hard to get a warrant anyway.

9/8/2014
Irving/TX
Hillary
Bradley/Nimitz
I think that the police should not be allowed to search for cellphones without a warrant. It's an invasion of privacy and it's just not right. Looking back at the fourth amendment, it prevents the government from searching a person's home and belongings and the police should follow that rule unless they have a warrant.

9/8/2014
Irving,TX
Claudia
Bradley/Nimitz
Having police search your phone would be like them being able to access any of your personal information whenever they want. If the police were to be able to access anybody’s phone whenever they wanted, nobody would ever feel secure about having any privacy at all. It is also understandable, however, that cellphones may, and most likely do, contain certain information/pictures that would help solve a crime. However, police should only be able to do that with a reasonable cause, and should follow the same procedures they would when searching a house with a warrant.

9/8/2014
Irving/TX
Juby
Ms.Bradley/Nimitz High School
According to the fourth amendment ,police should have a warrant that ask you the permission and gives you the reason why the search is being conducted.Looking things with permission and without permission makes a big difference.I agree with what supreme court says and I believe that the privacy of one person is important.“Privacy comes at a cost”.

9/7/2014
Irving/TX
Marilynn C.
Ms.Bradley/Nimitz High School
In the case of David Leon Riley, I agree with the supreme court that a warrant should be needed to search someone’s cell phone. In today’s society a cellphone contains someone's private life and personal information. No matter the the circumstance, police should always have a warrant to search someone's personal belongings.The fourth amendment clearly backs up this case, stating the prohibition of unreasonable search and if a search is needed a warrant is required. Even if a person were to get rid of their cell phone, there are many different ways to pertain the information that the cellphone contained.

9/7/2014
Irving/TX
Colton
Bradley Nimitz High School
It is like game wardens being able to barge into a house. If police suspect criminal activity, they can track a cellphone and arrest you then search it. After an arrest they have complete authority. It does not matter if they have a warrant or not.

9/5/2014
Irving,TX
Noemi
Ms.Bradley Nimitz High School
In the 18th century, the King of England allowed officials to search homes and seize everything without limitations, so long as the officials had a “general warrant.” After the colonies gained independence, they introduced the 4th amendment because of the history of warrant abuse. The 4th amendment clearly states that the government had to say specifically where the warrant was going to search, what it was going to seize, and then explain why there was probable cause to believe that thing to be seized was in the place to be searched. In the cases where evidence was collected illegally, the Supreme Court was morally wrong on letting a criminal walk free. However, the Supreme Court was following the laws that protect our liberties. If there is probable cause to search a cell phone, then of course it should be searched, with or without a warrant. If there is no reason, then there should be no searches. Now I will pose this question, is the right to privacy more important than the right to other’s safety? If the suspects walk because the police violated one amendment, we should be concerned of the consequences that could follow. It is understandable why we want our rights protected, our history is a reflection of that. However, this ruling made it difficult to arrest criminals thus endangering others. Isn't this endangerment a violation of our right to life?

9/5/2014
Irving/Texas
Kierria S.
Bradley/Nimitz
Warrants are primarily used to acknowledge that there is a search or arrest to be made because of evidence or witnesses are pointed toward a certain suspect. Police should always have legal warrants that represents the reason why they are searching, confiscating, and arresting if needed. Without warrants police can become very engaged in making a move without going over certain aspects about a case. I of course don’t think that it is an invasion of privacy to look through people’s phones. To me it holds the same equivalence as going through a metal detector. If your willing to put your life on a phone and you’re okay seeing everyday, then what difference does it really make for someone else to see it. The difference is that you may feel guilty or judge, and we need to learn to put aside those feelings in order to keep ourselves and others safe.

9/5/2014
Irving,TX
Miguel
Ms.Bradley/Nimitz High School
No, it is a complete violation of privacy. A similar case has reached the Supreme Court before, coming to conclude that they should not be able to do so. The fourth amendment prevents the government from performing unreasonable search and seizure, which now should include cellphones.

9/5/2014
Irving TX
Alex R
Ms.Bradley Nimitz High School
I agree with the supreme court that a warrant should be used to search someones cellphone. Unless there is probable cause. If you end up searching someones car and they have drugs or illegal firearms in their car then they can search his phone. Or if there is a car accident the police can search your phone to see if you were texting and driving. But if you pull someone over for speeding and they you don't search their car you shouldn't search their phone for it. And no it doesn't make it harder for law enforcement to arrest criminals privacy rights are important. Maybe law enforcement is trying to make their job easier instead of getting better at their job.

9/5/2014
Irving/Texas
Rachel
Bradley/Nimitz
While it is very clear that any evidence on a cellular device is fragile and very easy to delete and make difficult for an investigator to recover, this is no reason for violating a constitutional right. Despite the fact that the founding fathers had no earthly idea what a cell phone is, they recognized that the right of the people to not have their privacy rampantly violated by the various policing forces of the nation is an important one. Technological advancements don’t justify violating the right to privacy. Especially when, even if the evidence on the phone is deleted, a well trained technology specializing criminal investigation team can recover it. Nothing is ever really deleted.

9/5/2014
Irving/TX
Lee
Ms. Bradley/Nimitz High School
The right to privacy is a valuable right that should be protected closely and should not be a right limited to a select group of people. Police do not have the right to search an item that is not directly linked to the arrest. Therefore, a warrant is needed and steps should be taken to punish officers who do not comply. In fact, a better system should be employed to monitor police and make sure they are going through the proper procedures. Arrests do need to be made and criminals do need to be incarcerated, but we shouldn't have to sacrifice a just system whenever it is convenient for us.

9/5/2014
Irving/Tx
Hannah
Bradley/Nimitz
I agree with the Supreme Court’s ruling that a warrant is necessary to conduct a search on a criminal’s or potential criminal’s phone. A phone contains one’s entire life and the privacy granted by the 4th Amendment should carry over to these devices. A phone is not an immediate threat to anyone and when properly stored or when dealt with by a professional won’t be wiped clean of evidence. With this in mind law enforcers should have the time needed to obtain the warrant required to properly search someone’s phone. In addition to this, the Supreme Court’s ruling does allow for an immediate search of someone’s phone in an extreme emergency and unless this is the case, then there is no need to search a phone right away especially when you have that person in custody.

9/4/2014
Irving/TX
Jessica
Ms. Bradley/ Nimitz High School
I think that police should not be allowed to search our cell phones without a warrant. There would be no point in having warrants if they don’t use them. Warrants exist because it is a way of asking permission first to search your belongings. It is always necessary to ask permission, they can’t just randomly search through our phones without us knowing what is going. Unless it is an urgent search where lives are at stake, then it’s different. However, that’s unless the owner of the phone they are searching is definitely suspicious due to perhaps previous criminal history, and not just an ordinary citizen with a clean record. It all depends on who the owner of the phone is.

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