A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Ratification
Rational Basis Test
Reapportionment
Recess
Recess Appointments
Recession
Recorder of Deeds
Recreation Commissioner
Red Herring
Redistricting
Referendum
Register of Wills
Religious Test
Renewable Energy
Reparations
Representative
Republic
Republican Form of Government
Republicanism
Resolution
Respondent
Review
Rhetoric
Rider
Right Against SelfIncrimination
Right to an Attorney
Right to Be Informed of the Charges Against You
Right to Bear Arms
Right to Jury Trial
Right to Petition the Government
Right to Privacy
Right to Public Trial
Right to Speedy Trial
Right to Travel
Rights or Individual Rights
Roll Call Vote
Rule of Law
Recess Appointments
An appointment for a federal office made by the President when the Senate is not meeting. Recess appointments can serve until the end of the next session of the Senate. The President may nominate them again, but if they are not confirmed they must give up the post.

In the 19th century, this process enabled Presidents to keep the government functioning during the many months that Congress stood adjourned. In modern times, Congressional recesses are much shorter and Presidents have used recess appointments mostly for controversial nominees whose confirmations have been stalled.



By Donald Ritchie, Our Constitution (Oxford University Press)